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The English expression "fair enough" can be used to concede a point in an argument, or acknowledge the other person's position, without expressing complete agreement. To take an example from UrbanDictionary (surprisingly the best example I could fine):

Bro A: Dude, why didn't you take that job? The benefits were killer!

Bro B: Maybe, but it was so far out, I'd have spent more on gas than what they were willing to pay me.

Bro A: Fair enough.

Bro A does not necessarily agree with Bro B's decision, but he acknowledges his position and does not want to try and talk him out of it.

A similar situation is one in which one person is critical of another, but is rebuffed by a counter-criticism:

Bill: You really shouldn't drink so much. It's bad for your liver.

Jill: Don't you smoke a pack of cigarettes every day?

Bill: Fair enough.

In this case, Bill is acknowledging he's not in a position to be criticizing Jill's behavior.

In Chinese, what might be used to express the same idea as "fair enough" does in these conversations. I doubt it has to do with 公平.

Edit:

Another similar English expression is "You have a point", which expresses "You have a good argument, even though I might not agree with your conclusions".

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Essentially it's form of concession, either through a counterargument or the acquiesence of a mutually agreed upon opinion.

There are different ways to express concession in Chinese. Here are some possible translations that I can think of based on your examples. This is far from exhaustive and some of them might be preferred over others depending on the situation and context:

Bro A: 兄弟, 你为啥没要那工作? 有这么多的员工津贴! 
Bro B: 是啊,但这种工资水平还不够贴补我汽油费用的. 
Bro A: 嗯, 有道理.

Bill: 你真不该喝这么多, 太伤肝脏了. 
Jill: 你不也每天吸一包烟吗? 
Bill: (你)说得对.

Here are some others: 合乎情理, 说得通, 说得过去, (我)认了.

In the first example, Bro A has taken into account the additional information supplied by Bro B and has modified his previous conclusion. In this case, he's cooperating with Bro B so any reply that states 'your reasoning is sound' is suitable. This includes 有道理, 合乎情理, 说得通, 说得过去 and possibly 可能是吧 (which shows more doubts than the previous examples).

In the second example, Bill makes concession, due to his argument being countered by Jill. In this case, he's not cooperating with Jill, but acknowledging Jill's point/his defeat. So 说得对 is probably the best answer out of the list. 好吧 is appropriate, but it only serves as a precursor to what follows. One possible reply is 好吧, 我认输了. This particular reply is probably more appropriate after a long-winded argument with a lot of toing and froing.

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James, thanks for the prompt, quality answer. Could you add some information about the differences between the phrases you gave as possible translations? Also, I'd like to confirm that in the first one, it's possible to say 嗯,有道理 without meaning that you totally agree with his decision (merely that you understand it, or that it makes sense). –  Stumpy Joe Pete Jan 26 '13 at 22:20
    
Without being able to appraise the degree to which the different suggestions both acknowledge the opposing party's position without necessarily agreeing with it, I'm inclined to accept 葛修远's answer... –  Stumpy Joe Pete Jan 31 '13 at 17:50
    
I am hardpressed to come up with a situation or context. Sometimes it's a grey area. His suggestions are good, but are probably less suitable in your examples. In the first example, Bro A has taken into account the additional information supplied by Bro B and has modified his previous conclusion. In this case, he's cooperating with Bro B so any reply that states 'your reasoning is sound' is suitable. This includes 有道理, 合乎情理, 说得通, 说得过去 and possibly 可能是吧 (which shows more doubts than the previous examples). –  deutschZuid Jan 31 '13 at 21:29
    
In the second example, Bill makes concession, due to his argument being countered by Jill. In this case, he's not cooperating with Jill, but acknowledging Jill's point/his defeat. So 说得对 is probably the best answer out of the list. 好吧 is appropriate, but it only serves as a precursor to what follows. One possible reply, 好吧, 我认输了. This particular reply is probably more appropriate after a long-winded argument with a lot of toing and froing. –  deutschZuid Jan 31 '13 at 21:35
    
Edit this into the answer, and I will accept. –  Stumpy Joe Pete Feb 1 '13 at 0:45
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How about translating as 说的也是?

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post. –  deutschZuid Feb 2 '13 at 21:16
    
Yes it's an answer, just expressed in a rhetorical way. –  Dan Feb 4 '13 at 19:10
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"好吧" works perfectly in both these two situations and teens love it.

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Welcome to Chinese Language and Usage Beta! Usually we prefer longer and more elaborated answers on short answers. If you can improve your answer by adding detail, context, examples, and backing up with references, this would increase your answer's quality. Poor answers risk being down-voted and subsequently removed. –  Alenanno Jan 28 '13 at 15:44
    
I would almost upvote this just for the "and teens love it" part. –  Stumpy Joe Pete Jan 31 '13 at 17:51
    
I don't understand the 'teens love it' part though. –  deutschZuid Feb 2 '13 at 21:17
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How about simply "好吧" or "可能是吧"? They're both concession and seem to be suitable for giving in on a point that you're not totally convinced about or not totally interested in (which is similar to "fair enough" in English I think).

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Good suggestions –  Stumpy Joe Pete Jan 28 '13 at 6:50
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