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Many times I will know all the characters in a name but one & I'll ask what that one character means. 9 times out of 10 the response is, "That character has no meaning".

While it might be true that the character isn't used on its own, of course it must have meaning otherwise it wouldn't exist.

If someone asked me about a character, I might say, "Oh, in this phrase XX it means something like 'luck' but it isn't ever used alone".

Why does it seem that native speakers aren't willing to answer in that way? Why would a native speaker choose to say that a character has no meaning?

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While I can appreciate your frustration, it's not clear what your question is. SE is not a great venue for rants. Try editing to make it less emotional and more focused (what new information do you want from the SE community?). –  Stumpy Joe Pete Apr 30 '13 at 0:29
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The question is too broad and too vague. There are many possible reasons and depends a lot on who you asked and which character it was. My personal explanation is, we're taught this way in mainland China. Because the education system favors formulaic answers, the teachers want to make sure the students don't invent phrases or create usages out of the textbook, so they taught us things like 'the character alone has no meaning', 'the character usually means A but it means B in word X, although A and B are similar, B is not a natural extension of A but a special case tied to word X', etc. –  NS.X. Apr 30 '13 at 0:55
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Some characters used in names are just too unique and so rarely used that most people won't know the meaning. According to《異體字字典》, there are a total of 106,230 Chinese characters. Take for example this name 徐姳暄. How many people actually know the meaning of without referencing a dictionary? And how many can form a sentence with that? Sorry, I can't. –  Question Overflow Apr 30 '13 at 10:03
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Maybe they have no idea how to explain it? Not everyone is into linguistics. –  deutschZuid Apr 30 '13 at 21:21
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I'm commenting because you're question refers to Chinese names, but if I got what you mean: not all characters must have "meanings" or refer to some concept exactly like some words do in other languages. Think about grammatical words: and, if, so... They don't mean anything, they acquire meaning by being used, they're also called function words, if I can recall correctly. Same thing with some characters, like 了... Ok you know it's used as a particle, but by itself it doesn't have a real meaning like 猫, for example. –  Alenanno May 1 '13 at 9:44
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7 Answers

I personally believe that every character has its function in the sentence, but not all characters have a "translatable" meaning. Many characters, when they are added to the sentence, don't change the literal meaning of the sentence, but may create an emphasis or introduce a certain emotion, and there is no English equivalent to this phenomenon. Maybe that's why they told you those characters have no meanings.

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Agree. Language is not science! So you won't get any reasonable explanation of some certain stuff, like me during learning English. –  Jinzhao Huo Feb 26 at 8:20
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I found the same situation, living in China for quite some time, and unlike some other people who have answered, I understand exactly what you're asking. It was quite annoying to try to learn new words when the native speaker just tells you the meaning of 3 characters together and doesn't know or can't explain each character's meaning. I think the answer is related to how derivations work in English. Keep in mind that to us, the word duibuqi seems to be 3 words together because technically it is, but to Chinese people who aren't language experts, they will just think of it as one word, essentially.

There are some parallels in English. Think about it in the reverse. Imagine you are Chinese and you are asking an English speaker this question:

You say 'sorry' to mean duibuqi. What is 'sor' and what is 'ry'?

Can you answer that off the top of your head? Most English speakers incorrectly assume that prefixes and suffixes and word derivations aren't "words." They are words. Or at least they used to be words.

From an online derivation dictionary, this is how we have the word sorry:

Old English sarig "distressed, grieved, full of sorrow" (not found in the physical sense of "sore"), from Proto-Germanic *sairiga- "painful" (cf. Old Saxon serag, Middle Dutch seerigh "sore; sad, sorry," Dutch zeerig "sore, full of sores," Old High German serag, Swedish sårig "sore, full of sores"), from *sairaz "pain" (physical and mental); related to *saira- "suffering, sick, ill" (see sore (adj.)). Meaning "wretched, worthless, poor" first recorded mid-13c. Spelling shift from -a- to -o- by influence of sorrow. Apologetic sense (short for I'm sorry) is attested from 1834; phrase sorry about that popularized 1960s by U.S. TV show "Get Smart." Related: Sorrily; sorriness.

So it appears the answer to what is 'sor' and what is 'ry' would be: "Sor" means grieved or distressed "ry" (from online dictionary) means "indicating a state or condition."

Therefore while you may be asked by a Chinese speaker "What is sor and what is ry?" and you will feel like saying "Nothing, it's just one word," in this kind of context you would be wrong. They are two words indeed, we just don't usually use them separately. Sound familiar?

Disclaimer: I'm not a native Chinese speaker but the above answer does seem to be the most rational, to me.

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Actually it's true that every character have their own meaning. But many of foreigner can't understand every character without merge into sentence. So, probably they would just answer it NO MEANING. But as a person who are very linguistic, they can answer what it mean and completely answer what it's mean. For foreigner, even they know it can mean what, but they can't answer directly, cause afraid to answer wrong or not so sure. Also, in Chinese. A character can be noun, verb or etc more else. If a character be a thing or noun. We can easily said what it's mean. But for a name Character, it's hard to said what it's mean. Cause no one wanted to use their name character by thing or any no good meaning. You can't blame the person said like that, even no native will be same answer if they don't really know what it's mean. By which i know, chinese character are more than 3k and still increase also it can change time by time. So, hard to said for what it meanssss

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+1 for a brave attempt to explain this in English when this is not your first language! –  Bobble May 3 '13 at 9:45
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There are times when a character is inserted for emphasis. At such times, it can be said that the character in question has no ADDITIONAL emphasis.

An example is given in the following:

太: Meaning in 灰太狼

太 is the character with "no meaning" even though it has a "standalone" meaning of "too.'

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I'm not sure what your question is. As a native speaker, I think the words you refer to are function words (虚词), which have no direct meaning but has the function of organizing the sentence. The words have direct meaning are notional words (实词).

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Other terms you see a lot used by non-linguists are "function words" for the first, special kind and "content words" for the second, normal kind. (Linguists have a whole bunch of more specialized words.) –  hippietrail Feb 24 at 13:21
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You might come across the phrase 虛詞 which literally means "empty phrase" but refers to function words. I've heard people describe them as "meaningless" especially function words in classical texts but of course they have important grammatical functions.

As for lexical terms, each character had a well defined meaning in Old Chinese but nowadays many of them simply don't mean anything by themselves. There are a variety of reasons why a native might brush it off as "meaningless" but if you want to really get them to answer (and possibly offend them by asking a question they don't know how to answer) ask what the character meant originally in 文言/古文.

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It just depends. Though we say that a Chinese character has its meaning in a common way (such as "我" means "me/I"……). But we must say that some Chinese characters (especially some auxility words such as "之"……), in some sentences they really don't have a real meaning for the word itself but just plays a role to make up a whole sentence

[e.g] 大道**行,天下为公。 (most this senario is seen in WenYan).

Another thing we'd attention is that special characters making a whole special fixed usage such as your name, address Rd……. It's just for a caller so you cannot split them from each other.

[e.g]

王伟(A Chinese name, you cannot ask what is "王" and what's "伟", even if you know the two characters' meanings, the combined meaning doesn't fit)

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