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For academic purposes, I need to print out some pages of characters with stroke orders shown. Which computer fonts (e.g. TrueType or OpenType) are available which show the stroke order of each character (e.g. by showing numbers near the beginning of each stroke)?

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whose stroke order? chinese, taiwanese? –  magnetar Dec 25 '11 at 11:33
    
@magnetar There is a tag "simplified", so we know it refers to Mandarin. –  Alenanno Dec 28 '11 at 11:02
    
Stroke orders do differ even when characters are the same between regions: See 必http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stroke_order#Stroke_order_per_polity –  juckele Feb 23 '13 at 13:06
    
@Alenanno, Mandarin is a spoken dialect which is writeable both with traditional and simplified characters, just like other dialects such as Minnan (Taiwanese) –  Nannuo Lei Feb 23 '13 at 18:46
    
@NannuoLei This site is about Chinese mainly, though, not Taiwanese. If Taiwanese was the language being treated, we'd have that tag. –  Alenanno Feb 23 '13 at 19:10
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6 Answers

No fonts do, just sites with pictures or animations.

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The wikipedia page you linked seems to be only referenced from the Japanese version of Wikitionary. However, the Japanese stroke order may be different from Chinese. –  fefe Dec 28 '11 at 1:54
    
@fefe Where did you read that? There's only links to Chinese stuff in the details below. There's also a quick reference to Japanese too, but as a whole project, not for the character itself. –  Alenanno Dec 28 '11 at 10:12
    
I didn't read that ... I just happen to see some wikitionary pages like 走(ja, zh). I checked a few others and only the Japanese version contain the stroke order picture. Oh, I see it is also referenced in several other wikitionaries now. However, though in the origin section it listed reference for several regions, I want to know what will happen when these references don't agree with each other. –  fefe Dec 28 '11 at 10:49
    
Ok, but that character, when you click in "ja", it specifies it's Japanese and not Chinese, "ja.wiktionary.org/...". That link I provided in the example, belongs to this: "Printable black and white images showing common or specific to China stroke order...". –  Alenanno Dec 28 '11 at 10:58
    
Oh, finally found this, the Japanese version of stroke order seems to use jbw when the two are different. The the link you give should be the Chinese version. –  fefe Dec 28 '11 at 14:47
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MDBG has stroke animations for all the characters, and highlights the radical, but I don't think you can print it out. That said, it's available online, for free, so it gets points for accessibility.

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How do I access this feature? –  juckele Feb 23 '13 at 13:08
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@juckele Yeah, i was confused too. You have to look things up in the character dictionary (not the word dictionary). Then, click on the button with the arrows to the right of the resulting character, and then click the button with the brush. Then, i think it comes up with a java applet showing stroke order. –  Stumpy Joe Pete Feb 23 '13 at 20:03
    
You can also get to this by expanding the characters in the word dictionary it seems. –  juckele Feb 24 '13 at 18:21
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I just started a project to make such a font. You can find it here: http://rtega.be/chmn/index.php?subpage=68

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way to go @rtega! 加油!Keep it up! –  Nannuo Lei Feb 23 '13 at 18:48
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I will. The focus is now on HSK-characters. I basically started the project because I need them for my HSK practice sheets. –  rtega Feb 24 '13 at 20:02
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There is a website called 汉典. It is a dedicated Chinese character dictionary, and now has animated stroke order.

It is (almost) all Chinese though.

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As far as I know, there isn't any Chinese font with stroke order. But Japanese has: http://www.nihilist.org.uk, https://sites.google.com/site/nihilistorguk/. And I have to remind you, even one character is the same in Chinese and Japanese, its stroke order may be different.

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I don't know any fonts with stroke order, but there are some online resources:

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