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Literal translation:

你 - You
什么 - what / who / something / anything
都 - entire / all
不是 - blame

My guess - It's all your fault?

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Similar expression: 你算哪根葱. –  Stan Dec 7 '13 at 4:16
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Your main misconception here is that 不是 means ‘blame’. It does not. 不 means ‘not’ and 是 means ‘to be’. In other words, [you] [anything] [entirely/at all] [not] [are] is a verbatim translation that should make it clear how this means ‘You are nothing at all’. –  Janus Bahs Jacquet Dec 8 '13 at 14:49
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7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Literally: you are nothing at all, usually used in a disparaging way from what I can gather. It follows the common pattern of Sub+什么都不+Verb, meaning that the subject verbs nothing at all. Ex: 我什么都不知道 = I don't know anything.

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你什么都不是。 You are not anything at all.

你 you

什么 what (using the extending meaning "anything" here)

都 at all

不是 not, an auxiliary word means negative

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means: you suck!you are nothing!

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We're looking for long answers that provide some explanation and context. Don't just give a one-line answer; explain why your answer is right, ideally with citations. Answers that don't include explanations may be removed.

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你什么都不是actually means"you are nothing,what right do you have to do this?",it's usually used when you quarrel with someone you despise because he/she is snooty or stupid,it's sort of rude,a more common expression is 你算什么东西 or 你他妈算什么东西,i suggest that you'd better not say 你什么都不是,你算什么东西 or 你他妈算什么东西 unless you wanna give someone a lesson,because they are expressions in a rude way,but if you hear someone says that to you,it implies he/she is not friendly to you.Sometimes you may hear someone say "你什么都不是" to himself,it probably means he blames himself because he does something stupid.

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Simple translate: You are nothing.

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Actually, I learn this word from World of Warcraft. While the 4th boss (Deathbringer Saurfang) of Icecrown Citadel (ICC), he will say "You are nothing" to a player who been killed. And if you are played a Chinese version, you will see a text "你什么都不是" while hearing such a sad voice. hah –  Allen St.Clair Feb 21 at 6:23
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you are a nobody .我是中国人 我知道答案。告诉你们了

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Can you expand on that and give a more semantic explanation? –  deutschZuid Dec 9 '13 at 1:01
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@deutschZuid Allow me to explain. IMHO, You are a nobody. is a better translation than You are nothing. Person is implied in 什么. I agree that the OP of this answer is somewhat impolite. He probably deserves the downvote. But, his answer is the most correct one here.(I am also a Chinese.) –  scaaahu Dec 9 '13 at 11:53
    
"You are nobody" would be more idiomatic in English. 'A nobody' sounds very strange to my ears. Anyway, I was trying to encourage the guy to expand on his answer. I am fully aware what he meant. –  deutschZuid Dec 9 '13 at 20:16
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it's mean “You are a waste” but it is more tactfully。Don't be serious occasion to say this sentence, it is considered an insult or hurt. For example: meeting, break up ------------------------------You would think that this would be that, but it's true. In addition, I talk with Baidu Chinese translation (search engine a Chinese common) translated into English in released, may be because of social philosophy and misunderstanding, please forgive me

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Online translation engines do not translate text very well. This answer is almost completely unintelligible. And “You are a waste” is a different sentiment from 你什么都不是. –  Janus Bahs Jacquet Dec 8 '13 at 14:48
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