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How would I congratulate someone on getting a new job?

In English I would say something like:

Congratulations on your new job!

I've done a bit of research and came up with these:

祝你找到一个好工作

恭喜获得这个工作

你的新工作表示祝贺

But I'm not sure about how 'natural' these sound, or if there is a better alternative?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

「祝你找到一个好工作」 means "Wish you find a good job".
It's usually used when somebody is hunting for a (new) job,

「恭喜获得这个工作」and「你的新工作表示祝贺」 are quite natural expression.
But from my point of view:
「恭喜获得这个工作」 --> 「恭喜您获得这个工作」
「你的新工作表示祝贺」 --> 「对你的新工作表示祝贺」
are a little better.

You can also say 「祝您今后在工作岗位上大展鸿图!」 to wish other people a bright future on their new job.

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Both 恭喜您获得这个工作 and 对你的新工作表示祝贺 sound very formal. Is there a better alternative when speaking to a close friend? –  Inglis Baderson Dec 10 '13 at 1:13
1  
@AgreeOrNot to a close firend you can simply say「恭喜!」「好好干!」or「新工作加油!」 –  fabregaszy Dec 10 '13 at 1:27
    
@fabregaszy in 好好干, what does mean? –  Cocowalla Dec 10 '13 at 8:09
    
@fabregaszy What is the meaning of 加油? –  Cocowalla Dec 10 '13 at 8:10
    
@Cocowalla 「干」is a word like "do". It can represent a lot of actions. Here it means "do the job". And 「加油」means "come on" or "try one's best to do sth.". –  fabregaszy Dec 10 '13 at 11:07
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The simple and direct translation of

Congratulations on your new job!

is

恭喜你找到新工作!

This is mostly used when you know that person but not very close to him.

If you know him well, then you should say more, such as suggested by fabregaszy 祝您今后在工作岗位上大展鸿图 !

Everybody likes to hear good words!

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