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In this sentence

你叫我马丁好了。

what's the role of 好了?

I understand this sentence as "You can call me 马丁".

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4 Answers

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By using this word, you are reminding the listener that "he doesn't have to worry about something; just ignore it; don't be so polite; don't speak so formally".

In you case, the speaker wants to express that "That's OK to call me 马丁. Just call me 马丁. You don't have to call me in a polite way such as 马先生 (Mr. 马). Take it easy".

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In Chinese the particle 好了 is used to mean "OK".

So in the sentence:

你叫我马丁好了。

This would be translated as: "You can call me 马丁 (Martin), OK.".

好了 is also used to suggest something where you are not expecting a response:

现在我带你去看他好了。 = I'll take you to see them now.

In this case, the person could still refuse or suggest now is not the right time. But by using the 好了 the speaker is suggesting that the other party is likely to go ahead with the suggestion.

Contrast this with a sentence where 好吧 is used, which is more offering a suggestion:

我们现在去看他好吧? = Let's go and see them now, OK? or How about we go an see them now?

Also note that 好了 can be used in another context to indicate completion e.g.:

你吃好了没有? = Have you finished eating?

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It has no special meaning but just a tone as 就...吧. “你叫我马丁好了” equals “你就叫我马丁吧”.

If you really want to find a homologous word in English, it's "can just", in my opinion.

“你叫我马丁好了” means "You can just call me Martin". “我带你进去好了” means "I can just bring you in".

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There is no special meaning, just like a modal particle.

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