Take the 2-minute tour ×
Chinese Language Stack Exchange is a question and answer site for students, teachers, and linguists wanting to discuss the finer points of the Chinese language. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I find this sort of uncommon, unorthodox, whatever you wanna call it, pinyin very fascinating. These are the ones that I know of already - that, apparently, are still considered to be Mandarin. What I'm wondering is, are there others? What other wild, bizarre pinyin(s) exist in Mandarin and what characters go along with them?

𤭢

·cěi

·cèi

·fiào

·nún

biang

·biāng

share|improve this question
1  
fiao is absolutely dialectal (Wu dialect). –  user58955 May 16 at 16:26
    
Sure but 中华字海 p.1184 has it listed as fiào - mandarin enough for me! –  user3306356 May 16 at 16:41
2  
@user3306536 No, it includes many dialectal characters, as well as rare, strange, obsolete, even non-Chinese characters... –  user58955 May 16 at 16:46
    
These are very rare words,we don't use them in daily life.We always replace them with synonyms.They are all dialect words.We will use the dialect in the daily life and others. –  Zecy May 16 at 18:00
    
In fact there are too many. For some words, we just say them but never write them, especially in some dialects. And maybe no one knows how to write them correctly. Those characters, if written, usually have uncommon pronunciation. If you try to learn a dialect, you'll find a lot! –  Wu Zhenwei May 20 at 7:22

3 Answers 3

I think I know one.


dèn

This means "pull with a little brutal force".

share|improve this answer
    
Cool! Thank you. –  user3306356 May 17 at 14:21

Skimmed through the Pinyin index page of 汉典, and found that, as user58955 commented, most of the uncommon pinyin included there were either dialectal or obsolete, as a native speaker, I have never come across them in my life in either spoken or written mandarin.

I did find one that can still be heard in nowadays spoken mandarin but I guess most Chinese do not know how to write. That is an onomatopoeia: 欻(chuā) as in "欻的一声"

You may also like to know 嗲(diǎ), which means coquettish, although it may not sound that uncommon to native speakers.

share|improve this answer

so far,

nóu 羺

yō 哟

nòu 耨 搙 槈 檽 獳 鎒 鐞

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.