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8

Wen Lin is an amazing piece of software that has all of the etymological features you are looking for. The central downside is that it is a bit pricey. Most universities have a copy, though, and there may be the opportunity to get some kind of student pricing discount. (Not sure if that applies to your case.)


8

A friend and I have started to collect a list of characters easy to misread by language learners: http://code.google.com/p/eclectus/source/browse/trunk/libeclectus/data/similarcharacters.csv


6

Here is a nice short overview on Mandarin tone sandhis: http://web.mit.edu/jinzhang/www/pinyin/tones/index.html If you want to read into the details I have found the following a very good source (from the father of another romanization): "Yuen Ren Chao: A Grammar of Spoken Chinese. University of California Press, Berkeley, 1968, ISBN 0-520-00219-9."


6

I have had good results with the Stanford POS tagger.


6

Complete rule of tones change is not a simple subject which can be understood just b a list. But there is a simple one I think might be suitable for you. http://www.trinity.edu/sfield/chin1501/ToneChange.html Plus, if you are a foreigner who want learn Chinese without academic purpose, I think it's enough since many Chinese cannot use tones change complete ...


6

There is a web demo system called ICTCLAS (Institute of Computing Technology, Chinese Lexical Analysis System). It was developed by the Institute of Computing Technology, Chinese Academy of Science. There is also a web demo system from THULAS (Tsinghua University - Lexical Analyzer for Chinese), which was developed by the Nature Language Processing Group, ...


5

List of 236 sets of commonly confused characters on Cantodict.


5

老不死 == 老而不死 being old, but not die; It implies some old guy should die as soon as possible, rather than stay alive, wasting food and hurting others... etc. It's used to curse some old people whom you hate and consider to be useless to others. It doesn't mean Chinese think old is bad, instead Chinese people have a tradition to support old people.. Whereas, ...


5

I found the ABC Etymological Dictionary of Old Chinese to be a great source if you're interested in the evolution of the prounciation and meaning of Chinese words. It avoids etymology of character structure though; for that, I would suggest chineseetymology.org.


4

There is NO software that can check Chinese grammar mistakes with satisfactory results. Automatic grammar analysis is hard. We cannot even get satisfactory result in word segmentation. (Well, this is the story in research field) Microsoft Word has the functionality of spelling and grammar check for Chinese (it may not be installed by default in non-Chinese ...


4

I just want to supplement Fivesheep's answer with some examples. The closest equivalent I can find for 老不死 in English is "old fart". This is a very disrespectful way of addressing a senior person whom you despise. Example: 那老不死的为什么还不搬走? Why haven't that old fart move out of the house? Although the term 老不死 is usually used in a derogatory manner, ...


4

zhongwen.com has a very limited amount of information on each character's origin.


3

I don't know of anything exactly like that, but you can find characters with similar structure at zhongwen.com, and you can see the structural decomposition of characters at Wikimedia Commons.


3

As xiecheng mentioned, tones changes are very complicated, and there is unfortunately little material on subject. Not that you care to this extent, but one can actually "map" tones using audacity (http://audacity.sourceforge.net). If you do that, you'll see that tones change a lot when they are in sentences and that how and the extent to which a tone can ...


2

I started a web site to collect and help differentiate similar-looking Chinese characters: HorizontalHanzi.com You can either search for a character to view a list of similar ones (e.g. search for 主 and get 王, 玉, 壬) or just browse the database. Lists show the characters placed side-by-side for easy comparison as well as definition breakdowns and links to ...


2

without invoking any undesired connotations is the purpose of this question, right? In other words, the student wants to avoid 暧昧, please see the Q&A How to translate "暧昧" into English? for further explanation of 暧昧. Now, the answers for your questions, Is it possible for him to address her in emails as 亲爱的[Surname]老师 Don't use 亲爱的 ...


2

I think 敬爱的X老师 is good. 亲爱的 is mostly used to family member in China. 敬爱的 means 受人尊敬和喜爱的 and it is good for teacher and professor.


2

Chinese: A Comprehensive Grammar (Comprehensive Grammars)


1

In terms of the individual 漢字 (characters), there's the classic 說文解字 (Shuowen Jiezi) written in the 1st to 2nd century AD, which is the first and the most authoritative Chinese dictionary to attempt to trace the origin and evolution of each character. An online version is available here, or ZDict as mentioned above also contains the Shuowen entry. The ...


1

This is an excellent one (and it's free too ;) ) Yellow Bridge


1

In this post I gave an overview of online resources: On http://ctext.org/dictionary.pl?if=en you can see how a character evolved, the simplified and traditional characters. Another similar website is http://www.chineseetymology.org/CharacterEtymology.aspx . Zdict is completely in Chinese: http://www.zdic.net/zd/zi/ZdicE7Zdic9BZdicAE.htm ...


1

There's a list of etymology resources (including a couple already mentioned) on this page: http://mandarinportal.com/etymology.php


1

Regarding "The point won't hold after translation", maybe the words in this poem are relevant: See you later, alligator! After while, crocodile! In an hour, sunflower! Maybe two, kangaroo! Gotta go, buffalo! Adios, hippos! Chow, chow, brown cow! See you soon, baboon! Adieu, cockatoo! Better swish, jellyfish. Chop chop, lollipop. Gotta run, ...


1

In China, if you call anyone as 老不死, you are not praising him as "old and not died". In fact, you are asking him "why don't you go die?". So we think it's so impolite to call anyone 老不死, especially call elderly. Besides, there is a saying "老而不死是为贼“, it means that if someone is so old but never go die, then there must be something weird with him. Thus, nobody ...


1

Yuen Ren Chao: A Grammar of Spoken Chinese. University of California Press, Berkeley, 1968, ISBN 0-520-00219-9.


1

In university I had to write quite a few essays in Chinese, they follow the same basic structure of introduction, point 1, point 2, point... conculusion. I have also spent time correcting thesis and academic writing and it's pretty much identical to in the West. One point about learning to write better in Chinese that my wife taught me; don't get hung up ...


1

Though it is much smaller than the corpus you linked to, JuKuu is an excellent resource for finding example sentences involving Chinese terms. Typing a Chinese word or phrase into the search bar usually yields enough sentences to get a good sense of a term's meaning and usage.


1

A Practical Chinese Grammar for Foreigners, which is a great book for non-Chinese speakers. source: www.chinazest.com


1

AllSet Learning just launched a grammar web site, and the front page has a list of reference books that they used to prepare it. The site itself also looks useful. There's not a lot of detail yet, but they say they will continue working to add more content.



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