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2

I am working on some tiny SMT project at the moment and I was looking for this too, the only one I could find is this word list from this corpus of mid-20th century Hong Kong Cantonese, It might not be great if you are using them for learning Chinese, as it's mid-20 century's. And you need to registry for the site, but still it's much better than ...


0

I suppose that you mean "Were you holding your phone to your ear?" Then you can say "你 lik 住部手机来打啊?" I don't know the character for "lik", which means "to hold".


0

Here is one ::::::::::::::广东话常用语对照表 http://www.360doc.com/content/11/0228/19/4410155_96958044.shtml


3

Check out the list of classifiers on Wikipedia -- it notes that particular classifiers are Cantonese only, like zam6 for smells, bung6 for walls, gaan1 for stores, zoeng1 for chairs and so on.


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In some cases, people who are bilingual in Mandarin and Cantonese might use 個 and 條 as classifier interchangeably for road (路). In Chinese, 個 is a universal classifier or measure word for objects, you might hear it in many occasions to count a "stuff" even for a native speaker.


3

"條" is the correct one. I speak Cantonese and never heard of "個" in this case.


1

@Newman's answer about its origin should be right. "Mao Li" has the meanings of "fool" and/or "stupid person". And it also means "jerk", "bitch" and/or "son of bitch". In my opinion these meanings are used more often. When two people (Cantonese speakers) are quarreling with each other, one may say "你条茂李!", meaning "you son of bitch!" "Mao Li" is used in ...


4

It is one of the obscene language in Hong Kong. It can be write as 茂利/茂李 (mau6 lei2 in cantonese, Màolì in mandarin), sounds like an English word "mullion" In Cantonese, we use the word to describe a man standing still like a pillar, later use to describe stupid person. Reference from https://hk.knowledge.yahoo.com/question/question?qid=7008062100602, I did ...


2

You're probably referring to 無厘頭 (mou4 lei4 tau4), which in Cantonese refers to something illogical or nonsensical and gave its name to a genre of surrealistic comedy.


0

I think you maybe have understanding issues. 最多 does not mean "at least". It means at the most. I honestly have no idea why someone who provided you the best answer from user3992 is having negative points but his answer is correct.


1

Surprised no one mentioned Pimsleur ... http://www.amazon.com/Pimsleur-Chinese-Cantonese/dp/0743500172 I took 1 year of Cantonese at my Jr. College back in 2001. These audio CD's could help a BIT with pronunciation, but there really is no replacement for native speakers and conversation (over dim sum?)



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