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1

It's not standard Jyutping, but CantoDict uses the asterisk to indicate a changed tone. In your example, waa6*2, the standard citation tone for 话 is 6, but when pronounced in the word, 广东话, its tone changes to a rising tone, so it is denoted with a *2. A note at the footer of the definition page indicates this convention: Also, CantoDict uses a unique ...


1

Adding to @Claw's answer, Standard Cantonese used to have (and I heard in some dialects still has) TWO falling tones (and thus a total of 7 tones). This is still acknowledged in modern-ish dictionaries like the one published by CIHK. The former tone #2 was a high-mid falling tone, akeen to Hakka's fourth tone.


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To OP user5892, Hong Kong Cantonese is very different from mainland Cantonese as the two regions have been separate for at least 160+ years. Little exchanged happened, especially when Communists party gained control of mainland China and sealed itself off from the rest of the world since the 1940's. Hong Kong served as the most significant port for trade ...


4

Standard Cantonese's 陽平 tone is definitely pronounced with a falling contour (21). Modern Cantonese Phonology by Robert S. Bauer, p. 144 appears to acknowledge, but did not find, a low-level contour for this tone though: For the Mid-Low Falling tone both Yuan (1983:181) and Zhan (1985:168) also recognized a variant low level contour of ˩11 in addition to ...


1

Standard Written Chinese is the written form of Mandarin, and is the only form of written Chinese in widespread use. People speaking all forms of spoken Chinese, including Cantonese speakers, Hokkien speakers, etc., all learn to write in Standard Written Chinese, i.e. they all learn to write the way Mandarin speakers speak (for better or worse). There ...


1

It depends. To the best of my knowledge, the formal written form of Cantonese is pretty much identical to that used by Mandarin, excepting: Differences in usage (e.g. 玉米 v.s. 粟米 for "corn") Usage of traditional v.s. simplified characters, although this is only an issue in that Hong Kong / Macau, which are Cantonese-speaking use traditional characters, ...


3

Common romanization systems for Cantonese are Jyutping, Cantonese Pinyin, and Yale. In both Jyutping and Cantonese Pinyin, tones are represented with numbers. In Yale, tones are either indicated with tone marks coupled with -h, or with numbers: 1 high-flat 55 sī sīn sīk 1 high-fall. 53 sì sìn 2 mid-rising 35 sí sín 3 mid-flat 33 ...


2

Woo6-yi5 户珥 From this pdf pg. 14 户珥 is pronounced Woo6-yi5 (Jyutping should be something like: Wu6-ji5).


0

There is an on-line audio version of the Cantonese bible. This chapter is at https://wordproject.org/bibles/big5/02/17.htm I think I heard ji6, but I was pretty lost at the end.


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As for Cantonese, I had my junior high in Hong Kong during the 80's. I could remember as early as '83 and '84 did we start to say it in school. Etymologically it is 100% mathematical. :) A perfect example of mixing English into the daily Cantonese usage. The stress is on N when you say it, to emphasis the "countless many" 我打了N次電話都無人接聽! ...


3

As you suspected, it is thought to come from the mathematical usage: 为什么“N”可以代表“很多”的意思?例如N多次,N多个 Why can "N" have the meaning "a lot"? For instance, N-times, N-of-them 因为数学上的数列一般都用第N项代表任一项,可知无穷大的一项. Because in math, sequences usually use "the nth term" to represent any term, including unboundedly large ones. Another (perhaps more ...


1

Hm, in Mandarin people will say things like "聽了N次", meaning an unspecified but large number of times. I've heard this since at least the 1980s in Taiwan. I wonder if your example is an extension of the same idiom?



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