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The English Wiktionary has IPA for Cantonese along with other commonly-used romanization schemes (Jyutping, Yale and Cantonese Pinyin). For example, for the entry on 朋友, under "Pronunciation" in the Chinese section, you can click [Expand] to see the IPA /pʰɐŋ²¹ jɐu̯¹³/. There's also IPA for other topolects, like Mandarin (/pʰɤŋ³⁵ i̯oʊ̯³/ → /pʰɤŋ³⁵ i̯oʊ̯³/). ...


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You might try the 漢語多功能字庫, with traditional Chinese, English interface. On the top right corner, you can choose the scheme: IPA (number) & IPA(letter). Have fun. :)


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I'm a born Cantonese and I live in Hong Kong. The simple answer for not writing in Cantonese is because: it is not as useful as writing in Written Vernacular Chinese. The Brief History It has been a custom to write in Literary Chinese in the ancient times as you know, and people used to speaking in their own dialects. Because written records were so well ...


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(As a born Cantonese and not a professional linguist) Cantonese is mostly spoken while the formal written form of Chinese is always 白話文/語體文 ("Written vernacular Chinese", what I managed to find on Wikipedia). The written form of Cantonese is informal, and mostly used on Internet forum, text messages, modern subtitle, etc. In Hong Kong, the newspaper "Apple ...


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Why not write in written Cantonese? Cantonese people are not unwilling to write their own language. Nowadays, written Cantonese is often used in instant messaging, social network, advertisements and billboards. It is also gaining public attention as the Government of China wants to ban it. There is a Yue Wikipedia site containing 40,000+ articles. ...


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The modern written Chinese (白話文) is based on Mandarin, by the way of 我手寫我口 (I write what I say, 講乜寫乜). Imagine a dialog: we'll go for shopping, then have buffet, will you join? no, my iPhone is dead, but i don't have money for repair, what can i do? What do we say actually in Cantonese (講乜), if I write it down (寫乜): 我哋一陣去 shopping, 然後食 ...


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Awtho tradeetional Cantonaese haes been spaken fer a long tym, its spellin isna sae strict as in Mandarin, n aften hasna been teached at the schuil. Tradeeition haes it that the auld 文言文 was uised maist pairt in wrutten leid. Wrutten Cantonaese haes only been uised since the 20th yeirhunder, n resoorces aboot hou tae applee the leid in a conseestant mainer ...


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It's not really that Cantonese people are unwilling to write the language; It's simply because the language is very oral-oriented where many slangs are involves mainly for effectiveness purpose. It's similar to English when people use phase like "What ya'll doing?", which you won't see on most learning material for English or CNN news. In fact, written ...


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In most Cantonese speakers I know, 廿 is still a colloquial item of vocabulary, replaced with 二十 in usual formal writing; but 廿 remains a very common alternative, for counting as well as enumerating. According to CantoDict, the pronunciation "a" is the most common. This is verified in my experience; the variant with "e" I've not heard this before myself, but ...


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Their pronunciations (both Cantonese and Madarin) can be found on Wikipedia: 廿 niàn 卅 sà 卌 xì These three words can be found in poems, but are rarely used in mandar today, usually we use "二十/三十/四十" to represent twenty/thirty/forty. To be specific: 廿 is wildly used in some dialects (as far as I know in Zhejiang Province): we use "廿二" for 22. 卅: is used ...


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Learning to speak will not give you any bad habits that would later interfere with learning to read. But if you first learn to read, then you will use your own ways to hear the words in your mind, and it will be wrong (it will sound like your English). You will then have a lot of work to do overcoming those habits before anyone can understand you. In ...


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It depends on what you're trying to achieve. But Cantonese is used more often in speech than in writing: Most written materials in Cantonese-speaking areas still use Putonghua / Mandarin. Since you commented that you want to learn it mostly to understand speeches in a church, I'd recommend learning to speak first. Learning the characters can be difficult, ...


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勿 (U+52FF) is a chinese character since oracle bone script; it's a common character in literary chinese. http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-mf/search.php?word=勿 cantonese preserve more pronunciations of ancient chinese language; and some characters are still used in cantonese nowadays, while other pronunciation system evolves to used other ...


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Jave a look of these free materials: https://fsi-languages.yojik.eu/languages/cantonese.html Just curious, may I ask the purpose of learning? Lastly, beware of the tones, there are nine :)



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