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As others have commented, it is just another font. I would say just ignore it and as a learner, stick to the standard one for now, which is like three short strokes on the left. It would make more sense if we look into the origin of water character in Chinese: 水 (shui3). The pictographic form for 水 (shui3) looks like a river flow, which gradually evolved ...


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I think both "減" and "咸" exists in the ancient times, but for certain reasons scholars like to use "咸" in place of "減". 損也,從水,咸聲 == It has the same meaning as '損', water as glyph component, and the same pronunciation as '咸'. In 管子·宙合, which was written before the early Han Dynasty, it says "左操五音,右執五味,懷繩與准鉤,多備規軸,減 溜大成,是唯時德之節。 .... 減,盡也。溜,發也。 ...."


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I write a simple script to compute the plot from an old phrase frequency data. If you're interested, here is the raw data. These data are for Taiwan's traditional Chinese, but the statistics should be very similar to simplified Chinese.


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You can just ignore the difference between print fonts and handwriting font. It's in the same way that we don't write the letter 'g' (by hand) like the way we print it.


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There are many glyphs for Chinese characters, for example, Some glyphs for character "洗"



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