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14

TL;DR Long Answer From the oracle script to the seal script, character 龍 evolved from simple to complex. The seal script was already very similar to 龍. However later, variants (there were too many!) 𢅛 and 尨 appeared: Dictionary 集韻 (1037 AD) 古作[...]𢅛(帝+尨). The ancient forms for 龍 are [...] 𢅛(帝+尨) [...]. ...


11

Yes, it is indeed a variant of 两. You can see it listed here in the Dictionary of Chinese Character Variants 《異體字字典》: http://dict2.variants.moe.edu.tw/variants/rbt/word_attribute.rbt?educode=A00284 As for why they've chosen to write it this way, I'm not sure.


10

Popular perspective : “猫熊”变“熊猫” 抗日战争期间,在重庆举办了一次动物标本展览,正式对公众展出了“猫熊”这种动物的标本。当时人们写汉字的顺序还是从右到左,可是写“猫熊”时,却依了英文的书写顺序,从左到右了。结果,“猫熊”让观众念成了“熊猫”。这次展览,是熊猫首次在大众面前亮相,影响很大,“熊猫”之名也传播开了。 [ In 1940s, at an exhibition of panda specimen, the name of panda is written from left to right as 猫熊 in accordance with the English name. But at that time people were used to reading ...


8

This is a 隸書 form of 景. According to the references cited in the 教育部異體字字典, it occurs on steles from the Tang dynasty. Sometimes these variations are done for ease of cutting, or because certain forms tend to break or wear away very easily; I don't know if this is the case here. Another form that also seems to appear a lot is with two 日, a 日 on top and a ...


8

According to 说文解字, 从水,難省聲 So 漢 is taking as its pictophonetic part. 1. What does mean? This is the ancient inscriptions (甲骨文 and 金文) of it (from 字源谈趣). Its original meaning is to fire someone (as a penalty), who is tied up and crying to the sky. So it's used for the meaning of suffering or disaster, and then 難, 艱, 嘆 were created based on it. 2. ...


7

Originally, 晚 could be written as 莫 (in ancient form): 艹(草, grass)+ 日 (sun), referring to when the sun is below the grass -- sunset. In modern Chinese, we can understand or memorize it in this way: 日 (sun) + 免 (cancel), without the sun, sunset. Then its meaning extends to night and evening. So 晚 does mean night and evening, and they are its original ...


7

響 (xiang3) is the traditional form of 响, which means to "sound" or to "echo". It is not the same character as 想, which means to "think" or to "want". It is not uncommon for different characters to have the same pronunciation and tone. Examples off the top of my head include: zhong1: 中 (中国), 钟 (两点钟), 终 (终于) ying1: 应 (应该), 英 (英雄), 鹰 sha1: 杀 (杀死), 沙 (沙滩), 莎 ...


7

Is this discrepancy above due to a calligraphical mistake or lazyness, namely, leaving off that one tick, made a long time ago? TL;DR: I don't think so, because (1) 尸 used as the pictographic radical with the meaning house in 屋 was explicitly mentioned in 说文解字 long before, (2) the original meanings of 尸 and 户 used as radicals are not exactly the same (...


6

They are Bopomofos (注音符号): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bopomofo According to Wikipedia, Zhuyin fuhao, Zhuyin or Bopomofo is a system of phonetic notation for the transcription of spoken Chinese, particularly the Mandarin dialect.


5

If you're having trouble displaying the following characters install the Hanazono font. zisea 𬚆 𬚆 unicode码:2C686 zisea 𩫁 𩫁 unicode码:29AC1 拼音mao4 石 毛 doesn't seem to have much of a record as far as I can tell. No results found for “⿱石毛”. where ⿱ means top/bottom components in order of: 石(top) 毛(bottom) 𥎿 日 also ...


5

Of course it is. Interjections are far more common in any spoken language compared to its written counterpart. Chinese also consists of many words and phrases that are very formal and rarely spoken. https://naccl.osu.edu/sites/naccl.osu.edu/files/NACCL-21_Vol._1--Hongyin_Tao--pp._13-27.pdf could be taken as a starting point. While the ten most common ...


5

晚 itself means late, and it doesn't mean night, like 晚霞. While 夜晚, 晚上,晚间 mean night. So "beautiful night" is 美丽的夜 or 美丽的夜晚,not 美丽的晚。 However in some words the character 晚 does mean night, that is because it is kind of abbreviation, like 晚安, 晚饭, 晚会。 In regard to when to use 晚 and when to use 夜, there is no hard rule for that. There is no scientific ...


5

To answer your question, I think the answer is no. Learning radicals is indeed a good idea to improve your character recognition (and also remember them better, for writing). For example, knowing that the character 想 is composed of three radicals (tree, eye and heart) is useful if you study its etymology/origin or if you want to create your own mnemonic to ...


5

Although it is a potentially valid to use the slightly derogatory "cute" nickname, it is much more likely to be a more standard-sounding given name, for example 佳寧 or perhaps 嘉寧, both pronounced Jiāníng in Mandarin and Gā-nìhng in Cantonese. To my ear, both are female names. A quick Google returns quite a few profiles with this exact given name, ...


5

Chinese characters can have multiple meanings and multiple pronunciations. You figure out the intended pronunciation and meaning based on the context. In the context 睡觉 (Shuìjiào,"go to sleep"), the pronunciation is jiào and the meaning is "(a period of) sleep". In the context 感觉 (Gǎnjué, "feeling"), the pronunciation is jué and it contributes the meaning "...


5

黄 Simplifed variant (Unicode point U+9ec4) 黃 Traditional variant (Unicode point U+9ec3) ⿈ Kangxi radical 201 (Unicode point U+2fc8) 𡕛 Variant character (Unicode point U+2155b) 𨝴 Variant character (Unicode point U+28774)


5

I think it's 炒双冬. 双 here means two. One 冬 is 冬菇, also known as 香菇, a kind of mushroom, lentinus edodes. The other 冬 refers to 冬笋, bamboo shoots.


4

I think you are talking about 令牌 and 诏书. 令牌 is something like badge. It doesn't have any order on it, but just used to identify the person who carry it. 诏书 is orders written on paper, bamboo or something else.


4

As Stan hinted at, 宝 is a Japanese Shinjitai character. It is also a simplified Chinese character, but that's coincidental. Perhaps this fact isn't so well known, but PRC aren't the only ones that performed simplification to Chinese characters - it is merely the most well known and widespread. Japan attempted their own simplification process, but theirs was ...


4

That's a web development technique, the icon font What you see is meaningless text. This is actually a web development technique. They are attempting the use a custom designed "font" to display icons instead of the weird characters. However, when the icon font failed to load, your browser then attempts to display the "text" with a fallback font, generally: "...


4

There are official lists for this. See the following pages in the Chinese Wikipedia: 普通话异读词审音表 for mainland China 國語一字多音審訂表 for the ROC (Taiwan) Neither of the lists is complete; they are basically there to provide standard answers to test students on correct pronunciation. How many characters have variant readings is actually quite hard to answer; one ...


4

Short of a lexicographic analysis, you can't. There is a little punctuation in Chinese, so you can split sentences into subgroups. But after that, there's no easy way to say where a word stops. Even very common words like 的 (genitive marker, appears right after the possessor, eg 我的朋友: me, I; genitive; friend: my friend) cannot be relied on 100% to be always ...


4

What you posted is 常 (pinyin: chang2). It means always or often, and with New Year decorations, can appear in combination for example in well-wishing phrases about happiness, fortunes, health, etc. Recognition might be difficult because this is not the regular script typically seen in print text, but is instead written in semi-cursive script, also known as ...


4

The traditional character for 儿 is 兒. They are pronounced the same [ér].


4

explanation in modern day research: we use components (部件), to "build up" chinese characters; and there're 1316. http://chardb.iis.sinica.edu.tw/system_intro.jsp basically, we have 8 types of stroke (筆畫) to compose each component. about the "structural relations and configuration regularity" of components, have a look of this page; in english and ...


4

It is a rarely used Chinese character. It has two pronunciation: "zhǎn" and "zhàn". English meaning: to open, to stretch; to extend, to unfold; to dilate; to prolong. The radical of 㠭 is 工, such as the radical of 林 or 森 is 木. The stroke order of 㠭 is If you want to learn more common stroke orders of Chinese characters, I recommend to read learn ...


3

1235/3000 or 41%, by using grep '[.].[.*' on Wenlin's frequency list. 1 的 [de] (grammatical particle) [dì] 目的 mùdì goal [dí] 的确 [dī] cab 3 是 [shì] to be [tí] 4 不 [bù] not [bú] [fǒu] [fōu] [fū] 5 了 [le] (particle) [liǎo] 了解 comprehend [liào] (=瞭) [liāo] [liáo] 9 有 [yǒu] have; there is; 没有 haven't; 有的 some [yòu] (=又) [wěi] 10 中 [...


3

There's a few different ways to do this. Aurus Huang already suggested 心在哪裡,家就在哪裡。 above. Baidu gives us: 心之所在即為家 This Baidu Zhidao question also gives a lot of examples: 心中向往的地方就是你的家 家是心之所在 心所在的地方是家。 but my absolute favorite, and honestly the best translation of this phrase has got to go to: 心所向,家所在。


3

I assume you are talking about the origin and evolution of characters, as opposed to the origin and evolution of the words they represent. These two are complementary, but not identical. Analyzing characters and tracing their forms from the oracle bones through Zhou bronzes on into the forms used over 2000+ years of dynastic history is a huge job, and ...


3

说文解字:更易也。从辵虒聲。 Actually, 遞=辵+虒, it's a pictophonetic character which original meaning is "to alternate". The meaning radical(形旁) 辵 carries the basic meaning "to walk one moment and stop the next". The sound radical(声旁) 虒 only indicates the pronunciation of 遞(dì).



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