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12

This is more of a history question. 勇 is short for 乡勇, which roughly means "militia". They are temporary soldiers recruited from the local population in times of need, and are usually disbanded soon after. Soldiers wearing 勇 on their uniforms was a Qing dynasty thing though; they stood in contrast to the elite Banner Armies and the professional Green ...


11

Brief Answer Q1. The Wiktionary list of characters with the 冫 radical contains the following two characters: 冬, 冭. Where in these characters is the 冫? Are the two lines at the bottom supposed to be the ice radical? Answer: You're right. That's true. Q2. When I look at the entry for 永 in the Chinese dictionary app on my phone (Pleco), then it says ...


7

末 is logographically comparable to 本. The top stroke indicates the top branches of a tree, the end of the tree. Hence the meaning "end". However, 未 is unrelated to both characters above, it is just a representation of a tree. It is one of the twelve earthly branches, and as such a character that once had some original meaning that is now lost to us; it has ...


7

It is probably not the languages/dialects that don't have a corresponding Chinese character, but rather regional slang. The A菜 you see is actually 萵仔菜, or ue-á-tshài in Hokkien. That became became e-á-tshài which led it to be transcribed back into Chinese as A仔菜 and eventually A菜. There is actually a word for Q, but I am not aware of how to type that out on ...


7

How was it pronounced in older times (i.e. Middle Chinese)? I haven't found a record of 瞓 in classical Chinese, but since 瞓 and 训 are both read as fan in Cantonese, I'll take 训 instead. It is read qhuns in reconstructed Old Chinese that is before the 1st century B.C. In Middle Chinese it is pronounced as hyonh. How did the pronunciations ...


7

It's not likely you'll find this in any dictionary because it's a conglomeration of four characters: 招財進寶 "attracting money and treasure". See if you can find them. Hint: there is one part that is shared by two of the characters.


6

Yes, it is 踰 (yú): exceed, transgress, cross over. It is a variant of 逾. Characters are sometimes rendered differently. In this case, the phonetic is 俞 (yú), meaning "boat", and the bottom part is written similar to seal script style. Originally, the 月 and 刂 in 俞 were 舟 (zhōu, boat) and 巛 (chuān, water), and the seal character is a transition in progress. ...


6

Well, this is what Japanese speakers do when they look at a Chinese text – they have some understanding of it since they recognize the characters. One fundamental problem, though, is that in modern Chinese, the majority of words are made up of two characters. There are two types of dictionary for Chinese, one that gives character meanings (字典) and one that ...


6

So here's a wrap up of the comments above. 着 is a Simplified Chinese only† character, so you won't find it in Traditional Chinese dictionaries, unless they explicitly list them. See e.g. 教育部重编国语辞典. (找不到, because there is not such character in Traditional Chinese) I assume that OP uses Traditional Chinese because of the 這 used in the example sentences. † ...


5

The discussion on zdict basically explains that the Oracle bone script morphed (讹变) into its current form, but this transformation did not follow standard rules. The original Oracle bone script shows a man riding a horse, which means "to ride" (i.e. what 骑 means today), but when small seal script was developed, the horse morphed into 可, which violates the ...


5

Yes, they both mean river. But 江 only refers to extremely large rivers while 河 can be any kind. There are more than 2000 main rivers in China, only a handful of them are called with 江. For example, 长江, 黑龙江. 黄河 is the second longest river in China, followed by 长江. Note the 河 here is referring to an extremely large river. You can also use 河 in sentence ...


5

江 is mostly used in the South; 河 is mostly used in the North. There are exceptions, such as 黑龙江, 浏阳河. Scale. 江 is exclusively for mighty rivers; 河 can be used for both large and small rivers. All foreign rives are named with 河. There is no fundamental differences between 河 and 江. 江 is used for rivers whose banks are steep cliffs; 河 is used for rivers with ...


4

Yes they are the same, just font issue.


4

自个儿 zìgěr pronoun colloquial oneself, by oneself 不要只顾自个儿。Don’t just think about yourself. 自个儿 is the a colloquial way to say 自己. On top of my head, I couldn't see any example where they are not interchangeable. The only difference between them perhaps is just that 自己 can be used in formal context while 自个儿 is rather colloquial. ...


4

Before getting into you assumptions I think it's best if we take a look at a post on Language Log from Victor Mair, a name students of Chinese are probably quite familiar with: Cantonese Novels by Victor Mair In my estimation, there is far too little genuine topolectal literature in China. Throughout history, nearly everything has been written ...


4

Edit: I overlooked the simplified Chinese tag. Now adding simplified chinese version back I assume your sentence have a [hidden context]: I thought it would look good [but it turns out to be awful] In this case I would translate it as: 我以為那會好看(Trad.)/我以为那会好看(Simp.) To divide it word by word then reverse translate: (我)(以為)(那)(會)(好)(看) ...


4

Basically they can use as a unit of scale. From biggest to smallest 洋>海>江>河>湖>湾>溪 洋(ocean):比海大的水域 海(sea):靠近大陆比洋小的水域 江(Jiang? basically bigger river):大河的通称 河(River):水道的通称 湾(Lake):水流弯曲的地方 湖(Bay):陆地上聚积的大水 溪(creek):山里的小河沟


4

That is a standard character, simplified 携, meaning carry, take along, hold in hand. A common word is 携带 (carry).


4

The only online dictionary database I can find is 《新华字典》. It is a Microsoft Access database containing 20823 characters. You can run a query on the database and search for "方言" in the "xiangjie"(详解) column. There are shortcomings however, 20823 characters may not be comprehensive enough, and it usually doesn't tell you which dialect the character is used in. ...


4

I suggest just explaining the origin: 曾子曰:「吾日三省吾身:為人謀而不忠乎?與朋友交而不信乎?傳不習乎?」——《論語·學而》 The philosopher Zeng said, "I daily examine myself on three points: whether, in transacting business for others, I may have been not faithful; whether, in intercourse with friends, I may have been not sincere; whether I may have not mastered and practiced the ...


4

without implying that the classical explanation is necessarily correct, worth noting that 康熙字典 thinks 或 was the original single character for 惑, before the latter character was introduced. Not hard to see how the grammatical usages of 或 could have evolved while it still also meant 惑. Or the other way around, the grammatical function could have been original, ...


3

Chinese characters can be broken up into a number of categories, only one of which are pictograms like you described. 象形字, or pictograms, are simple characters like 日, 山, 口 that are visual representations of the words that they mean. 指事字, or simple ideograms, are simple characters like 上 and 下 which are visual representations of more abstract concepts, ...


3

This guy gdfsljz made a post in the zdic forums I think it quite enlightening 丼 [汉字资料]: 粤方言中,此字则解释为粤语中dump的正字。贵州苗族中,有格丼(bong)一地,是苗语中圣地的意思。由于丼字是冷僻字,为了便于宣传,当地政府已将其改为格凸。字典解释[编辑本段]辞海:其一念 jǐng/ㄐㄧㄥˇ,即井字的古字;其二念 dǎn/ㄉㄢˇ,即东西投到井里的声音。语源由来辞典(日本):丼とは、食物を盛る茶碗より厚手で深い陶制の钵。どんぶり钵。また、どんぶり钵に入れた料理。(大意为:盖饭、比盛食物的碗更深的陶制钵。 ...


3

Zhongwen.com illustrates the different phrases one can put together with the character 自 (zì). Note that "oneself" and "since then" are valid possible meanings. Jukuu.com provides many sample sentences for both of these phrases, here are two: She was humming a tune to herself. 她自个儿哼着小调。 (note that 從 cóng is simplified here as 从) He ...


3

Literally, 更容易 could mean easier or more easily, 才能 could mean then be able to (as a verb) or talent and ability (as a noun), So I would say they are equivalent (i.e. more easily to do something or then we are able to do something) in a way, but not exactly interchangeable.


3

Could someone tell me if these two words in the image below are equivalent? Yup. Is this a significant difference, or perhaps just a font-issue? Fonts. The font Song might give you the desired result.


3

For translating foreign name based on pronunciation, there is a rule, which may be different for mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. You can find some celebrity with the same name, looking it in wikipedia and change it to Chinese version. It will be much difficult if you want to choose a Chinese name, not a translation. Choosing name is an art. It is a ...


3

I'm not sure how well it's implemented but you can check this out: 台湾闽南语推荐用字 台湾闽南语推荐用字 台湾闽南语推荐用字为台湾闽南语书写系统的汉字建议用字表,实施单位为中华民国教育部。 简介 台湾闽南语推荐用字于2009年9月中发布完700个字,并发布于教育部国语推行委员会(国语会)1的网站,免费供一般社会人士与学生等下载运用。 台湾官方以4年时间整理的用字,第一批闽南语推荐用字于2007年5月30日颁布,共有300字2, 2008年5月1日公布第2批100字3, ...


3

If you want to study character's origin, you have to look up references like 說文解字 instead of Wiktionary, which may be incomplete or incorrect. The original character of 冰 is 仌. You may look up the original text of 說文解字 here. When it is in 冬, it becomes two lines at the bottom as you describe. 冫is not simplified from 氷, but 氷 is simplified from 冰, which is ...



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