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12

東: 主人。由於古時主位在東,客位在西,所以稱主人為「   東」。如:「房東」、「店東」。 Translation: In ancient times, the host was seated to the east and the guest to the west, so the host was called "East". reference: http://dict.variants.moe.edu.tw/yitia/fra/fra01875.htm Personally I have also heard it is because the Sun rises from the east, thus east is seen as the 'emic', or the 'theme'


12

This is more of a history question. 勇 is short for 乡勇, which roughly means "militia". They are temporary soldiers recruited from the local population in times of need, and are usually disbanded soon after. Soldiers wearing 勇 on their uniforms was a Qing dynasty thing though; they stood in contrast to the elite Banner Armies and the professional Green ...


11

Brief Answer Q1. The Wiktionary list of characters with the 冫 radical contains the following two characters: 冬, 冭. Where in these characters is the 冫? Are the two lines at the bottom supposed to be the ice radical? Answer: You're right. That's true. Q2. When I look at the entry for 永 in the Chinese dictionary app on my phone (Pleco), then it says ...


10

The earliest texts with 乒乓 I can find is vernacular novels of Ming dynasty. 《西遊記》 Journey to the West as an example: 如此二三日,又聽得後宰門乒乓乒乓,磚瓦亂響。——Chapter 10 他掄槍舞劍,一擁前來,照行者劈頭亂砍,乒乒乓乓,砍有七八十下。——Chapter 14 乒乒乓乓,好便似殘年爆竹;潑潑喇喇,卻就如軍中炮聲。——Chapter 16 “乒” and “乓” are used together as onomatopoetic in history. :)


7

How was it pronounced in older times (i.e. Middle Chinese)? I haven't found a record of 瞓 in classical Chinese, but since 瞓 and 训 are both read as fan in Cantonese, I'll take 训 instead. It is read qhuns in reconstructed Old Chinese that is before the 1st century B.C. In Middle Chinese it is pronounced as hyonh. How did the pronunciations ...


7

It's not likely you'll find this in any dictionary because it's a conglomeration of four characters: 招財進寶 "attracting money and treasure". See if you can find them. Hint: there is one part that is shared by two of the characters.


7

Generally putting XX is fine unless formal. People use that a lot orally. X is usually pronounced as 叉, but can vary based on region. Formally and also very commonly for missing name is using 某. 王某 (someone with surname 王 and one-character given name) 王某某 (someone with surname 王 and two-character given name) 某某/某某某 (very general, someone with unknown ...


6

Well, this is what Japanese speakers do when they look at a Chinese text – they have some understanding of it since they recognize the characters. One fundamental problem, though, is that in modern Chinese, the majority of words are made up of two characters. There are two types of dictionary for Chinese, one that gives character meanings (字典) and one that ...


6

So here's a wrap up of the comments above. 着 is a Simplified Chinese only† character, so you won't find it in Traditional Chinese dictionaries, unless they explicitly list them. See e.g. 教育部重编国语辞典. (找不到, because there is not such character in Traditional Chinese) I assume that OP uses Traditional Chinese because of the 這 used in the example sentences. † ...


5

A quick perusal of my database gives me u-cjk/6299 抙 ⿰扌手 u-cjk/726a 牪 ⿰牜牛 u-cjk/72be 犾 ⿰犭犬 u-cjk/73cf 珏 ⿰王玉 u-cjk/8aa9 誩 ⿰言言 u-cjk/8e00 踀 ⿰𧾷足 u-cjk-xa/3908 㤈 ⿰忄心 u-cjk-xb/201a7 𠆧 ⿰亻人 u-cjk-xb/23c99 𣲙 ⿰氵水 u-cjk/9342 鍂 ⿰金金 (considering only Unicode code points). I tested against the RegEx ...


5

Yes, they both mean river. But 江 only refers to extremely large rivers while 河 can be any kind. There are more than 2000 main rivers in China, only a handful of them are called with 江. For example, 长江, 黑龙江. 黄河 is the second longest river in China, followed by 长江. Note the 河 here is referring to an extremely large river. You can also use 河 in sentence ...


5

江 is mostly used in the South; 河 is mostly used in the North. There are exceptions, such as 黑龙江, 浏阳河. Scale. 江 is exclusively for mighty rivers; 河 can be used for both large and small rivers. All foreign rives are named with 河. There is no fundamental differences between 河 and 江. 江 is used for rivers whose banks are steep cliffs; 河 is used for rivers with ...


5

I strongly recommend an online dictionary 汉典. It may be the most professional online Chinese dictionary even for native speakers. For every entry, you can refer to the section "字形分析" to know the classification of the character. For example, the character 强 is classified as compound ideographs (会意), which is shown in the picture: The dictionary also ...


5

么 has lost most of its lexical meaning in modern usage, but it appears to have originally been derived from the word 物, meaning 'thing'. Chinese by Jerry Norman, pp. 119-20 makes mention of the etymology of various modern words featuring 么: In an insightful article, Zhāng Hùiyīng (1982) has shown that shénme 什么, the standard modern word for 'what', comes ...


5

□ (white square) is used to indicate that some characters are missing or unrecognizable. Each white square correspond to one such character. See 虚缺号的用法.


4

自个儿 zìgěr pronoun colloquial oneself, by oneself 不要只顾自个儿。Don’t just think about yourself. 自个儿 is the a colloquial way to say 自己. On top of my head, I couldn't see any example where they are not interchangeable. The only difference between them perhaps is just that 自己 can be used in formal context while 自个儿 is rather colloquial. ...


4

Edit: I overlooked the simplified Chinese tag. Now adding simplified chinese version back I assume your sentence have a [hidden context]: I thought it would look good [but it turns out to be awful] In this case I would translate it as: 我以為那會好看(Trad.)/我以为那会好看(Simp.) To divide it word by word then reverse translate: (我)(以為)(那)(會)(好)(看) ...


4

匈 is the ancient character of 胸, means chest/breast. And I can't find any other original meaning of it besides this. “胸”的古字 [bosom;chest] 匈,膺也。——《说文》。字亦作胷、作胸 According to the explanation of 胸, it's a later character for 匈. 从肉,匈声。本作“匈”,胸是后起字。 匈奴 is just the transliteration from the name of an ancient nationality in North China, has nothing to do ...


4

I'm not sure how well it's implemented but you can check this out: 台湾闽南语推荐用字 台湾闽南语推荐用字 台湾闽南语推荐用字为台湾闽南语书写系统的汉字建议用字表,实施单位为中华民国教育部。 简介 台湾闽南语推荐用字于2009年9月中发布完700个字,并发布于教育部国语推行委员会(国语会)1的网站,免费供一般社会人士与学生等下载运用。 台湾官方以4年时间整理的用字,第一批闽南语推荐用字于2007年5月30日颁布,共有300字2, 2008年5月1日公布第2批100字3, ...


4

I suppose you are looking for a list of such characters in Simplified Chinese. There is probably more, but here you go. Notes I added extra lists just for completeness. Feel free to add to it! By "non-radical" I mean the identical parts are not a radical themselves. Top-bottom Radical Pair 炎、多、昌、二、亖、畕、仌、歨(not 走) Left-right Radical Pair ...


4

Basically they can use as a unit of scale. From biggest to smallest 洋>海>江>河>湖>湾>溪 洋(ocean):比海大的水域 海(sea):靠近大陆比洋小的水域 江(Jiang? basically bigger river):大河的通称 河(River):水道的通称 湾(Lake):水流弯曲的地方 湖(Bay):陆地上聚积的大水 溪(creek):山里的小河沟


4

That is a standard character, simplified 携, meaning carry, take along, hold in hand. A common word is 携带 (carry).


4

The only online dictionary database I can find is 《新华字典》. It is a Microsoft Access database containing 20823 characters. You can run a query on the database and search for "方言" in the "xiangjie"(详解) column. There are shortcomings however, 20823 characters may not be comprehensive enough, and it usually doesn't tell you which dialect the character is used in. ...


4

I suggest just explaining the origin: 曾子曰:「吾日三省吾身:為人謀而不忠乎?與朋友交而不信乎?傳不習乎?」——《論語·學而》 The philosopher Zeng said, "I daily examine myself on three points: whether, in transacting business for others, I may have been not faithful; whether, in intercourse with friends, I may have been not sincere; whether I may have not mastered and practiced the ...


4

without implying that the classical explanation is necessarily correct, worth noting that 康熙字典 thinks 或 was the original single character for 惑, before the latter character was introduced. Not hard to see how the grammatical usages of 或 could have evolved while it still also meant 惑. Or the other way around, the grammatical function could have been original, ...


4

亚 means inferior, hence Asia is an inferior continent? No, it has to do with approximating sounds with characters, and of the six available for ”meng”, 蒙 was perhaps considered most appropriate, for the reason you hint (home of grassland). Note that it was the invading Mongol Yuan dynasty who created the Mongol empire from nomadic tribes such as Xianbei and ...


4

So, I think I just wrap this up in a proper answer instead of some comments with links. Basically, there are two major changes: 9 new characters were added to the CJK Unified Ideographs block. A new block called 'CJK Unified Ideographs Extension E' with 5762 ideographs was added to Unicode. You can find these here (.pdf file). Characters from the ...


4

In 春秋左傳 (722/468 BCE). http://ctext.org/chun-qiu-zuo-zhuan has the statement 楚失華夏. Huaxia used to denote tribes that later became the Han people, and later the term shifted to symbolize China. Hua is the beautiful clothes worn by the Chinese, xia is for the grandness of the culture. 「中國有禮儀之大,故稱夏;有服章之美,謂之華。」《春秋左傳正義》 References: Wikipedia: Huaxia ...


3

the usage is classical and shows up at least as far back as mencius: 吾豈好辨哉?吾不得已也。Here the meaning is quite literally "I cannot (不) achieve/obtain (得) an end (已)" to my argumentativeness. In other words, i have no choice but to argue. You might compare it with the much more colloquial 不得不. By the way be careful about the whole multi-character words thing. ...



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