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12

東: 主人。由於古時主位在東,客位在西,所以稱主人為「   東」。如:「房東」、「店東」。 Translation: In ancient times, the host was seated to the east and the guest to the west, so the host was called "East". reference: http://dict.variants.moe.edu.tw/yitia/fra/fra01875.htm Personally I have also heard it is because the Sun rises from the east, thus east is seen as the 'emic', or the 'theme'


11

Yes, it is indeed a variant of 两. You can see it listed here in the Dictionary of Chinese Character Variants 《異體字字典》: http://dict2.variants.moe.edu.tw/variants/rbt/word_attribute.rbt?educode=A00284 As for why they've chosen to write it this way, I'm not sure.


10

The earliest texts with 乒乓 I can find is vernacular novels of Ming dynasty. 《西遊記》 Journey to the West as an example: 如此二三日,又聽得後宰門乒乓乒乓,磚瓦亂響。——Chapter 10 他掄槍舞劍,一擁前來,照行者劈頭亂砍,乒乒乓乓,砍有七八十下。——Chapter 14 乒乒乓乓,好便似殘年爆竹;潑潑喇喇,卻就如軍中炮聲。——Chapter 16 “乒” and “乓” are used together as onomatopoetic in history. :)


8

It's not likely you'll find this in any dictionary because it's a conglomeration of four characters: 招財進寶 "attracting money and treasure". See if you can find them. Hint: there is one part that is shared by two of the characters.


8

This is a 隸書 form of 景. According to the references cited in the 教育部異體字字典, it occurs on steles from the Tang dynasty. Sometimes these variations are done for ease of cutting, or because certain forms tend to break or wear away very easily; I don't know if this is the case here. Another form that also seems to appear a lot is with two 日, a 日 on top and a ...


7

Generally putting XX is fine unless formal. People use that a lot orally. X is usually pronounced as 叉, but can vary based on region. Formally and also very commonly for missing name is using 某. 王某 (someone with surname 王 and one-character given name) 王某某 (someone with surname 王 and two-character given name) 某某/某某某 (very general, someone with unknown ...


7

Originally, 晚 could be written as 莫 (in ancient form): 艹(草, grass)+ 日 (sun), referring to when the sun is below the grass -- sunset. In modern Chinese, we can understand or memorize it in this way: 日 (sun) + 免 (cancel), without the sun, sunset. Then its meaning extends to night and evening. So 晚 does mean night and evening, and they are its original ...


6

They are Bopomofos (注音符号): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bopomofo According to Wikipedia, Zhuyin fuhao, Zhuyin or Bopomofo is a system of phonetic notation for the transcription of spoken Chinese, particularly the Mandarin dialect.


5

So, I think I just wrap this up in a proper answer instead of some comments with links. Basically, there are two major changes: 9 new characters were added to the CJK Unified Ideographs block. A new block called 'CJK Unified Ideographs Extension E' with 5762 ideographs was added to Unicode. You can find these here (.pdf file). Characters from the ...


5

I suppose you are looking for a list of such characters in Simplified Chinese. There is probably more, but here you go. Notes I added extra lists just for completeness. Feel free to add to it! By "non-radical" I mean the identical parts are not a radical themselves. Top-bottom Radical Pair 炎、多、昌、二、亖、畕、仌、歨(not 走) Left-right Radical Pair ...


5

A quick perusal of my database gives me u-cjk/6299 抙 ⿰扌手 u-cjk/726a 牪 ⿰牜牛 u-cjk/72be 犾 ⿰犭犬 u-cjk/73cf 珏 ⿰王玉 u-cjk/8aa9 誩 ⿰言言 u-cjk/8e00 踀 ⿰𧾷足 u-cjk-xa/3908 㤈 ⿰忄心 u-cjk-xb/201a7 𠆧 ⿰亻人 u-cjk-xb/23c99 𣲙 ⿰氵水 u-cjk/9342 鍂 ⿰金金 (considering only Unicode code points). I tested against the RegEx ...


5

I strongly recommend an online dictionary 汉典. It may be the most professional online Chinese dictionary even for native speakers. For every entry, you can refer to the section "字形分析" to know the classification of the character. For example, the character 强 is classified as compound ideographs (会意), which is shown in the picture: The dictionary also ...


5

么 has lost most of its lexical meaning in modern usage, but it appears to have originally been derived from the word 物, meaning 'thing'. Chinese by Jerry Norman, pp. 119-20 makes mention of the etymology of various modern words featuring 么: In an insightful article, Zhāng Hùiyīng (1982) has shown that shénme 什么, the standard modern word for 'what', comes ...


5

□ (white square) is used to indicate that some characters are missing or unrecognizable. Each white square correspond to one such character. See 虚缺号的用法.


5

If you're having trouble displaying the following characters install the Hanazono font. zisea 𬚆 𬚆 unicode码:2C686 zisea 𩫁 𩫁 unicode码:29AC1 拼音mao4 石 毛 doesn't seem to have much of a record as far as I can tell. No results found for “⿱石毛”. where ⿱ means top/bottom components in order of: 石(top) 毛(bottom) 𥎿 日 also ...


5

Of course it is. Interjections are far more common in any spoken language compared to its written counterpart. Chinese also consists of many words and phrases that are very formal and rarely spoken. https://naccl.osu.edu/sites/naccl.osu.edu/files/NACCL-21_Vol._1--Hongyin_Tao--pp._13-27.pdf could be taken as a starting point. While the ten most common ...


5

晚 itself means late, and it doesn't mean night, like 晚霞. While 夜晚, 晚上,晚间 mean night. So "beautiful night" is 美丽的夜 or 美丽的夜晚,not 美丽的晚。 However in some words the character 晚 does mean night, that is because it is kind of abbreviation, like 晚安, 晚饭, 晚会。 In regard to when to use 晚 and when to use 夜, there is no hard rule for that. There is no scientific ...


4

匈 is the ancient character of 胸, means chest/breast. And I can't find any other original meaning of it besides this. “胸”的古字 [bosom;chest] 匈,膺也。——《说文》。字亦作胷、作胸 According to the explanation of 胸, it's a later character for 匈. 从肉,匈声。本作“匈”,胸是后起字。 匈奴 is just the transliteration from the name of an ancient nationality in North China, has nothing to do ...


4

I'm not sure how well it's implemented but you can check this out: 台湾闽南语推荐用字 台湾闽南语推荐用字 台湾闽南语推荐用字为台湾闽南语书写系统的汉字建议用字表,实施单位为中华民国教育部。 简介 台湾闽南语推荐用字于2009年9月中发布完700个字,并发布于教育部国语推行委员会(国语会)1的网站,免费供一般社会人士与学生等下载运用。 台湾官方以4年时间整理的用字,第一批闽南语推荐用字于2007年5月30日颁布,共有300字2, 2008年5月1日公布第2批100字3, ...


4

亚 means inferior, hence Asia is an inferior continent? No, it has to do with approximating sounds with characters, and of the six available for ”meng”, 蒙 was perhaps considered most appropriate, for the reason you hint (home of grassland). Note that it was the invading Mongol Yuan dynasty who created the Mongol empire from nomadic tribes such as Xianbei and ...


4

In 春秋左傳 (722/468 BCE). http://ctext.org/chun-qiu-zuo-zhuan has the statement 楚失華夏. Huaxia used to denote tribes that later became the Han people, and later the term shifted to symbolize China. Hua is the beautiful clothes worn by the Chinese, xia is for the grandness of the culture. 「中國有禮儀之大,故稱夏;有服章之美,謂之華。」《春秋左傳正義》 References: Wikipedia: Huaxia ...


4

As Stan hinted at, 宝 is a Japanese Shinjitai character. It is also a simplified Chinese character, but that's coincidental. Perhaps this fact isn't so well known, but PRC aren't the only ones that performed simplification to Chinese characters - it is merely the most well known and widespread. Japan attempted their own simplification process, but theirs was ...


4

That's a web development technique, the icon font What you see is meaningless text. This is actually a web development technique. They are attempting the use a custom designed "font" to display icons instead of the weird characters. However, when the icon font failed to load, your browser then attempts to display the "text" with a fallback font, generally: ...


4

I think you are talking about 令牌 and 诏书. 令牌 is something like badge. It doesn't have any order on it, but just used to identify the person who carry it. 诏书 is orders written on paper, bamboo or something else.


4

Short of a lexicographic analysis, you can't. There is a little punctuation in Chinese, so you can split sentences into subgroups. But after that, there's no easy way to say where a word stops. Even very common words like 的 (genitive marker, appears right after the possessor, eg 我的朋友: me, I; genitive; friend: my friend) cannot be relied on 100% to be always ...


3

the usage is classical and shows up at least as far back as mencius: 吾豈好辨哉?吾不得已也。Here the meaning is quite literally "I cannot (不) achieve/obtain (得) an end (已)" to my argumentativeness. In other words, i have no choice but to argue. You might compare it with the much more colloquial 不得不. By the way be careful about the whole multi-character words thing. ...


3

The Nom Foundation has a lookup tool that might give a clue: Although I don't understand which entry belongs to which character, or what the relationship among the characters is (Han Nom was less standardized than Chinese Hanzi, so some of the 4 shown here might even be distinct variants), my best guess based on the expressions is 'mold/mould' as in ...


3

男子汉 means a manly guy, a strong man, or a courageous fighter. The grammar doesn't seem natural in Chinese. It actually originated in a foreign language and borrowed to Chinese. Here is some text about its origin: ...


3

biáng 56 strokes as in biangbiang面, specialty noodles that can be easily found on the streets of Xi'an. Some would say it isn't a real word (even though it refers to a real food). Some would say there are characters with more strokes (and they would be right). Some would say that this character doesn't count because the question asks for the ...


3

This guy gdfsljz made a post in the zdic forums I think it quite enlightening 丼 [汉字资料]: 粤方言中,此字则解释为粤语中dump的正字。贵州苗族中,有格丼(bong)一地,是苗语中圣地的意思。由于丼字是冷僻字,为了便于宣传,当地政府已将其改为格凸。字典解释[编辑本段]辞海:其一念 jǐng/ㄐㄧㄥˇ,即井字的古字;其二念 dǎn/ㄉㄢˇ,即东西投到井里的声音。语源由来辞典(日本):丼とは、食物を盛る茶碗より厚手で深い陶制の钵。どんぶり钵。また、どんぶり钵に入れた料理。(大意为:盖饭、比盛食物的碗更深的陶制钵。 ...



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