Tag Info

New answers tagged

3

That's a web development technique, the icon font What you see is meaningless text. This is actually a web development technique. They are attempting the use a custom designed "font" to display icons instead of the weird characters. However, when the icon font failed to load, your browser then attempts to display the "text" with a fallback font, generally: ...


0

well, I think you might misunderstand the true meaning of Sapporo beer. To be frank, if you put this question on "Japanese Language" category, you may get better answers. Sapporo is a city of Hokkaido (State? maybe) of Japan, Chinese character is "札幌"。 Sapporo (Full name is Sapporo Breweries) is a beer maker as well, see wiki. And "七宝" is one of the beer ...


4

As Stan hinted at, 宝 is a Japanese Shinjitai character. It is also a simplified Chinese character, but that's coincidental. Perhaps this fact isn't so well known, but PRC aren't the only ones that performed simplification to Chinese characters - it is merely the most well known and widespread. Japan attempted their own simplification process, but theirs was ...


3

Those crazy characters is actually meaningless for native Chinese. I find baidu use a web technique that use character encoding to simplify their development. Through the web tools,I find the icon is used '\e601' for the Bai,and '\e602' for du ,'\e603' for 百科. So it is not the problem of baidu, maybe caused by some other extensions or softwares. Or ...


0

When teaching people who already speak any Chinese language or dialect, pinyin first. (These days literacy in China is so close to 100% this is likely only with children or elderly rural people.) When teaching people who do not speak any Chinese language or dialect teach pronunciation first. Introducing pinyin too early leads to pronunciation based on ...


0

I don't know if you still want answers, since this is so old. I start with PY only in their textbook (I wrote my own for first year). But you can put posters of things with characters around the room too. When I begin teaching characters, I first teach the strokes (find them in characters, write them), then radicals (about 60-70 starting with the pictograms, ...


11

Yes, it is indeed a variant of 两. You can see it listed here in the Dictionary of Chinese Character Variants 《異體字字典》: http://dict2.variants.moe.edu.tw/variants/rbt/word_attribute.rbt?educode=A00284 As for why they've chosen to write it this way, I'm not sure.


0

I think the explanation is that Chinese is not only written but spoken, and a lot of characters, while used in idiomatic daily speech, don't really have a formal written counterpart. If you ask locals to actually write this character out, most likely they'll write a commonly used character with the same pronunciation. However, language experts who wrote the ...


3

I assume you are talking about the origin and evolution of characters, as opposed to the origin and evolution of the words they represent. These two are complementary, but not identical. Analyzing characters and tracing their forms from the oracle bones through Zhou bronzes on into the forms used over 2000+ years of dynastic history is a huge job, and ...


0

Just like English, Mandarin uses only few thousand words for day to day communication.(including news paper and such) This word is not being used currently and it would be hard to start using it since its not included in regular Chinese character set on computers.



Top 50 recent answers are included