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I strongly recommend an online dictionary 汉典. It may be the most professional online Chinese dictionary even for native speakers. For every entry, you can refer to the section "字形分析" to know the classification of the character. For example, the character 强 is classified as compound ideographs (会意), which is shown in the picture: The dictionary also ...


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Not a list (and only kind-of machine parseable): http://chineseetymology.org/CharacterEtymology.aspx?submitButton1=Etymology&characterInput=%E5%95%A5


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An exhaustive list may not exist, but you can take the Wikipedia article as a starting point, and then googool further. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_character_classification


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If this blog and that are correct, these four characters are indeed 寶丁山房, penned by the famous Korean calligrapher Kim Jeong-hui 金正喜 in memory of 丁若鏞. The characters on this wooden board look like 隸書 calligraphy to me. Please compare with the 隸書 section in the calligraphy samples of 寶, 丁, 山, and 房 respectively. It seems like Kim is being creative with the 丁 ...


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It looks like it is indeed 丁. The Flickr link mentioned the photo was taken at 茶山草堂. With that information, I was able to find another site with a photo of the same doorway indicating that it says 寶丁山房. I don't know the specific reason why the character is stylized in this way, though 茶山 refers to the pen name of Joeng Yak-yong (丁若鏞), so it could be in ...


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According to a post on the zDic Forum for that character from 2010, it is a topolect character (despite its rather mysterious pedigree in the Kangxi Dictionary). However, I couldn't find it in the 《成都方言詞典》 Chengdu Dialect Dictionary, nor a lexeme corresponding to it. On consulting the 《四川方言詞典》 Sichuan Dialect Dictionary from 1986, I only find it ...


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I looked around, and it doesn't seem to be a complete, freely available resource for stroke orders. There is a Wikimedia commons project for creating stroke order for CJK characters, but it is far from finished (please contribute!). I also found this resource from Dragon Character Training, an old PalmOS application, which seems to contain some character ...


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So, I think I just wrap this up in a proper answer instead of some comments with links. Basically, there are two major changes: 9 new characters were added to the CJK Unified Ideographs block. A new block called 'CJK Unified Ideographs Extension E' wit 5762 ideographs was added to Unicode. You can find these here (.pdf file). Characters from the first ...


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Chinese characters are divided into traditional Chinese and simple Chinese. Simple Chinese is used in the mainland China and traditional Chinese is used in Hong Kong and Taiwan. Before the People's Republic of China, traditional Chinese are also used in mainland China. But after the foundation of People's Republic of China, simple Chinese are set for ...


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Traditional to Simplified is many-to-one, right?? It is almost the case that each Traditional character maps to exactly one Simplified character (possibly itself). This is certainly the mental model that most people have about simplification, and it's not far from the truth. Alas, there are exceptions. One of my favorite references on this topic lists out ...


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Time and space. Characters often morph into new meanings, and also take on a new shape, when there is a certain amount of linguistic autonomy between regions. This is no different from the Latin alphabet having countless of different variants, like Runic or Etruscan, but the Chinese situation is further complicated by the sheer number of characters and the ...



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