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10

Can this be used for people hold onto broken items/trash? Yes. This is the most common usage and safe to use. Can this be used for getting over failed relationships? Yes but don't use it if there is still chance for the relationship to be fixed or if the other party is also your friend. Because 旧的 (old thing) is more or less derogatory. Can this be ...


8

As Fivesheep pointed out, “四海” means "the whole world". The word "四海一家" means "the whole world is one family". It is used to expressed that "we are family. we shall respect each other. we shall unite", something like this, to convey the politeness from the overseas Chinese people to the local people(in your case, the Australian people). I believe this word ...


7

I'll answer based on the article provided by @Stan. From what I can tell, it is a transcription from a 1999 article that appeared in 《语文建设》, the raw data of which came from 汉语成语考释词典 by 刘洁修, 1989. Period | Number | Percent ---------------------------------+--------+-------- 春秋以前 Before Spring and Autumn | 88 | 1.21 春秋 Spring ...


7

I may answer to the first part of the question. I did a script to search all 4 characters ChengYu with your requirements. Here a resume about their number and the exaustive result from my db (ccdict). 一一(26) 一二(13) 一三(5) 一四(1) 一万(2) 一九(1) 一十(5) 二一(2) 二三(1) 二五(1) 二八(1) 二六(1) 二四(2) 三一(2) 三七(1) 三九(3) 三二(1) 三五(6) 三六(5) 三四(21) 四五(2) 四八(4) ...


5

theory 1: Coffin is made up of three long and two short pieces of wood. And Coffin means death, dangerous. you also can find some clues in the wikipedia article about "使用筷子禁忌". theory 2: Taoist forecasts through burning incenses. It is the most dangerous condition that there are three long incenses and two short incenses after burning five incences in some ...


5

爱不释手 is idiom in Chinese. You cannot split and use it. In most time, we use it as adjective or adverb to describe that you love something very much. Common Usage: 爱不释手的{Object} 他对他的{Object}爱不释手 {Object}让我爱不释手 Sorry ,I miss the etymology: 南朝·梁·萧统《陶渊明集序》:“余爱嗜其文,不能释手。”


4

I've come across a PhD dissertation which covers this exact topic plus many others: Analysis of Chinese Four-Character Idioms Containing Numbers: Structural Patterns and Cultural Significance Nall, Timothy M. 2009 It turns out this subject is much larger than I anticipated, so I'll only strictly answer the question I've asked (chengyu with ...


4

It should be 君令有所不受. The whole sentence 将在外,君令有所不受 means: (if) the general is far away (at the battlefield), he does not have to obey all emperor's orders. The deeper meaning is that the general should judge and act according to the real situations at the battlefield and thus doesn't need to obey all the orders. 将在军 means the same as 将在外. 军 there means at ...


4

四海如家 doesn't sound like an idiom. I think 四海为家 is what you are talking about. In ancient china, people didn't have the idea of oceans named Pacific, Indian... They tended to believe china was surrounded by 4 seas, 东海, 南海, 西海, 北海(if you know the chinese myths you might have heard of 四海龙王). In the idiom, 四海 means anywhere, or the whole world (Ancient chinese ...


4

在改革开放以前,大陆这边搞政治运动和大跃进嘛。为了“赶英超美”,提出“大炼钢铁”,所以就喜欢把人称为“铁人”、”铁姑娘“来表示这个人能吃苦、会劳动,是对人的一种褒美。 而对于饭,俗文化中认为“吃软饭”代表一个男人靠他的女人过活,所以“饭硬得像钢“也是对饭和人的褒美。 尽管如此,根据某些意见,当时要是说出这样的话属于觉悟低,甚至要被扣上“阴谋颠覆生产”的罪状。所以可能和政治没有关系。 引用汉典论坛的讨论,“人是铁,饭是钢”有两个含义:1. 人是铁,但饭比铁厉害,铁是斗不过钢的。不吃饭是不行的。2. 人是铁,经过吃饭,锻炼成钢。以上的观点源自商务印书馆出版、由日本语言学者集体编写的《现代汉日辞海》中谚语“人是铁,饭是钢”一词的解释。 Before the Reformation and Open ...


3

Here are some pairs which frequently appear: 三 and 二/两: 三三两两, 三心二意, 三天两头, 三长两短. 三 and 五:三令五申, 三五成群, 三番五次, 三纲五常. 四 and 八:四平八稳, 四通八达. 三 and 六/九:三头六臂, 三六九等, 三教九流, 三公九卿, 三跪九叩. 五 and 十:五光十色, 一五一十. 千 and 百/万:千奇百怪、千方百计、千辛万苦、千恩万谢. You may notice that: (1) 三 is often used. In classical Chinese (文言文), 三 not only means the exact number of "three", but also ...


3

To understand such an unsophisticated phrase, one should look for the most straight-forward and culturally obvious explanation. That is, I don't think analysing the chemical properties of iron and steel will be the right way to go. Instead, there is one very obvious relationship between iron and steel: steel is tougher than iron. This fact is historically ...


2

It seems that that at some time dweg (or died while eating gumbo) has been used in English by some people. Although I can't find many references to it. The definition for dweg can be found on this website: http://www.abbrt.com/dweg For some reason this ended up in the Comprehensive English-Chinese Dictionary which is one of the sources of Nciku. Nciku also ...


2

This is a Chinese slang which doesn't have very solid logic in it. It's very hard to track the original source of this expression but most people guess it's getting more and more popular in 1980s. When I was a child, my grandma often said this when I wasn't likely to have food on time. I personally think this is because Chinese people were so hungry in ...


2

“爱不释手”usually used to describe that someone like something so much,and can't bear to put it down. it is an adjective to describe small things that you like .for example, when you get a watch for Christmas ,you can say " 我对这个手表爱不释手"means "you like the watch so much,that you keep touching or looking at it" and the "something"should be of small size and not a ...


2

There's usually stories where the numbers come from. Can't remember a lot from when I learned them in grade school but here's one example. 九五至尊 至尊 means Supreme. It's usually associated with the emperor. The nine and five, 九 and 五 respectively comes from the fact that nine is the largest single digit number and five is the middle number of the single ...


2

I come from a family that speaks Cantonese, and we say 三更半夜 (although my mother says 半夜三更 I don't know why). 三更半夜 refers to "midnight" (doesn't have to be exactly 12:00 am, but some time around 11:00 pm and 2:00 am mainly). One time I was still up at 1:30 am and my father comes in and says 「現在三更半夜,你還沒有睡覺嗎?」. Basically what he was saying was, "It is very ...


2

晦's original meaning is dark moonless night, here it figuratively means the lack of accomplishment or culture. And other words' meanings are: 韬 : restrain, hide 光 : shine, ray of light, here it figuratively means talent 养 : cultivate, train So 韬光养晦 means to hide talent and keep improving, to achieve balanced development.


2

Maybe the answer is this 学者以为三长两短指的是未盖上盖儿的棺材,因为棺材正好由三块长木板、两块短木板构成一个匣子。棺材是用来装死尸的,“三长两短”在口语中常指意外的灾祸、有生命危险的事故,或许与此有关。 The coffin has three long wood pieces and two short wood pieces, so 三长两短 is a sign for bad things or in Chinese 三 does not mean really numbers, it refers to huge number of things(just like 三人行必有我师), so perhaps 三长两短 has something ...


1

The same way how Americans pronunciate "our" like "R" when it should be pronunciate as "hour", your friend perhaps was using regional dialect to pronunciate "更" as 经. However, I disagree with all explainations above. Both 深更半夜 and 三更半夜 are idioms although they have the exact same meaning, they are not dialect.


1

三长两短 refers to a coffin. The lower part of the coffin is made of 3 long wooden board and 2 short wooden piece of board. It is also referring to death or something very bad that related to life danger. Other usage on non-living things, it refers to severe damage, unrecoverable malfunction or lost. Example: 我可以把手机借给你,但是万一它有什么三长两短,你可要赔一部新的给我。 Translate: I ...


1

Yes, there is something missing but for reason, you know in Chinese, four has special meaning, people learned that there are four directions, North, East, South, West, so four means something just fine. in other hands, the pronunciation of four is similar with the pronunciation of death in Chinese, so four is good, but the pronunciation of four is bad, you ...


1

爱不释手: Can be explained as: 释:放下。喜爱得舍不得放手。 Its origins are noted as: 南朝·梁·萧统《陶渊明集序》:“余爱嗜其文,不能释手。” And has the following usage notes: 补充式;作谓语、状语、宾语;含褒义,表达喜欢物件 Source: http://dict.baidu.com/s?wd=%E7%88%B1%E4%B8%8D%E9%87%8A%E6%89%8B


1

I think "将在外,君命有所不受" is correct. it is a ancient idiom in china. It means if one army general is having a war with enemy, he can do something against the idea of the emperor, in China the method to win a war is changing by many conditions. for example weather, location or the superiority of the soldier. so the decision of general is very flexible. if you are ...


1

It has lots of variants however all of them should be "君" (emperor), other than "军". Just to mention another implied meaning of this sentence. Although it means "A general at battle field far away does not have to strictly obey all the orders from the emperor", it implies something else in many cases in the history, as wars are so frequent and certain ...


1

Usually we use the first one:将在外,军令有所不受, which means the general doesn’t have to wait for the king’s order in a war, because things change very fast in a war, so a good general should have the ability to decide what to do without waiting for his king’s order. 军令 means “military orders”, 君令and 君命 both mean "king’s orders". 不受 and 不授 both mean "don’t ...



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