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9

个 is a generic identifier for all objects. 这 and 那, as you know, are just specifiers for this or that. Now, if you know the specific measure word for the object you're trying to describe, you should use it. It makes you sound more fluent/mature... you'll often hear kids in China use 个 for everything... Like, 这条鱼 (Zhè tiáo yú) sounds much better than 这个鱼 ...


8

重叠量词 (repetitive classifiers) are used to indicate: every, or; one by one, or; abundance. 除了计量名量词外,不少量词可以重叠使用。例如:名量词:个个/件件/张张。动量词:次次/趟趟/回回。 量词重叠还有一种形式是 “一XX” 如 “一个个” “一件件” “一趟趟”,这种形式表示的语法意义有和上面的重叠形式相同的,也有不同的。意义有三种: 表示“每一”。基本同 “XX” 重叠式。小伙子们一个个身强力壮。 表示“逐一”。表示此种意义的重叠形式作状语。我们要一件件仔细检查,不要漏掉。 表示“多”。他一次次给我打电话。 Source ...


8

General answer to disrespectful measure words I can't recall any special disrespectful measure words in Chinese. Such disrespectful phrases are just expressed with simple measure words according to the noun. Like 他是 一个笨蛋 [offensive level: 1] 一个饭桶 [offensive level: 2] 一个贱人 [offensive level: 4] 一个傻逼 [offensive level: 5, with profanity word ...


7

Here has been my (I think successful) strategy: Use measure words for mass nouns accurately. This is exactly like English: 一杯水 = a cup of water 一瓶可乐 = a bottle of cola 一斤青菜 = a half-kilo of cabbage You really have to use these in all languages, because you can refer to really different quantities depending on the measure word (a tank of ...


7

There is no strict rule, it's more like a convention. English uses similar measure words too. For example, you say "A bow of rice" = 一 碗 米, or "A pair of glasses" = 一 副 眼镜. Here is a very useful Wikipedia article that outlines the measure words in Chinese. You can use 个 in most case, but it would be a bit weird in some cases. For example, you would say 一 杯 ...


5

First, your are correct that 汉子 is more commonly being refer to as a man / manhood. And 条 is quantifier for refering things that are long, straight. So go figure =P. However, 条 is not derogatory. We also use 条 for a life e.g. 一条人命, or a river 一条河, or loyalty 一条心. So it very much depends on the context.


5

一扇窗户 refers to a window on the wall, while 一个窗户 refers to the object (frame and glass) of the window. In most cases, 一扇窗户 is the only correct choice, 一个窗户 should not be used even in everyday speaking. However, 一个窗户 is more appropriate when: the window is not installed on the wall yet. the window refers to something in computer interface (窗口). the window ...


4

Technically, you would use 间 for all rooms: 一间卧室 (a bedroom), 一间书房 (a study). 间 can refer to larger spaces as well in Mandarin spoken in Taiwan and Cantonese: 一间学校 (a school), 一间饭店 (a restaurant), 一间房子 (a house/apartment). Note that mainland China accepts this usage now and you can hear 一间饭店/学校 in the news. There is also the trend to simplify all ...


4

Must the numerals be monosyllables? In my opinion, you can use multi-sllable numbers, like: 十五六公里 (fifteen or sixteen kilometers) 百八十个 (one hundred or eighty) 三十七八岁 (thirty-seven or thirty-eight years old) Restrictions on the measure words? No, I have no idea. Can there be at most two numerals? Yes, I have never seen more than 2 numbers ...


4

There are only a few phrases made up from 回事: 怎么(一)回事: what the matter with ..., why ..., what is the reason for ..., what happened 这回事: The matter you just mentioned (E.g 没这回事。 There was no such thing) 一回事: The same. (E.g. A和B是一回事。 A and B are the same (matter).) In the above situations, "件" cannot be used.


3

Check out the list of classifiers on Wikipedia -- it notes that particular classifiers are Cantonese only, like zam6 for smells, bung6 for walls, gaan1 for stores, zoeng1 for chairs and so on.


3

When you don't know the measure word, the safest choice is 个. It is the most common measure word, is used for things that do not have specific measure words, and can sometimes be used even if another measure word is used: ...


3

Noun phrases in many cases require classifiers (= measure words). 个 is the generic classifier, but you should use whichever classifier is appropriate. Note that 一 is usually elided from "下一个": Next month = 下(一)个月 Next week = 下(一)个星期 The next book (e.g., imagine it's a series) = 下一本书 The next photo = 下一张照片 Some words are "their own measure word" in some ...


3

Measure words is a feature in modern chinese. I think you have to learn and use repeatedly to memorize them. Pratice makes perfect, right? Actually, there are many cases. "个“ is very common, but it doesn't cover all the cases. Below are some examples: 一幅画(a picture) 一张纸(a piece of paper) 一眼泉(a spring) 一棵树(a tree) 一条鱼(a fish) 一匹马(a horse) 一只猫(a cat) Notice ...


2

As far as I know there is no exact rule, it will depend on the object itself. From the top of my head you will say 一根筷子,一根头发, with 根, which here is used for long and thin object (like for a chopstick or hair). You can find other similarities like this, but I am afraid not ring to "rule them all", you will have to learn them little by little. About the ...


2

It depends on your definition of 'authoritative'. If you are looking for formal dictionaries as opposed to crowd-sourcing efforts, dedicated to measure words, there are 《量词词典》, 《现代汉语量词用法词典》, 《现代汉语量词规范词典》, etc. You can find them by searching '量词+词典' on Amazon, Douban or other book sources. If you are looking for 'the source' that's used by all the schools ...


2

"條" is the correct one. I speak Cantonese and never heard of "個" in this case.


1

So what do I need to know about using "下一个" or just "下一"? “下” means "next" in English. but the latter "一" or "个" is not a fixed phrase with "下". “一” is a numeric word plus "个” (a unit word). So from linguistics speaking, the structure of the phrase is: 方位词(localizer)+数词(numeric word)+量词(Unit word)/或者名词(noun) So you can substitute any of them, such as: ...


1

Since you're in Taiwan, I'll use traditional characters. No, it's not part of of the phrase "next". It's separate. 下 indicates "the next" and 一個 as you said is a counter. 下一個 literally is "the next one", 下兩個 "the next two", 下三個 "the next three", etc. You'll have heard these: 下一位 (xià yī wèi) "next person" (when in a queue/waiting in line) 下一站 (xià yí ...


1

Usually if you can’t say the item’s name, you can just say: “我(wǒ)要(yào)这(zhè)个(ɡe)” (I would like this one) or “我(wǒ)要(yào)那(nà)个(ɡe)” (I would like that one) For the counter word, if you really don’t know exactly the counter word for the item, you can use the most common counter word “个(ɡè)”.


1

If you look into things like 常用量詞手冊 (use Big5 encoding), all you can get is some absolutely out of date information. The process of becoming authority is opposite to daily usage of a living language. 【張】ㄓㄤ 計算某些可張開物體的單位。如:「一張弓」、「兩張嘴」。 ...


1

Hong Kong Cantonese uses the expression (一 ) 條 友/友仔 (jat1) tiu4 jau5/jau5zai2 one long:MW friend as a contemptuous way of referring to a person. While 個 can be used instead, the measure word 條 suggests something long, slippery and unpleasant.


1

I think English usage can serve as a good reference here. In English, saying "7 or 8" sounds normal as a way of expressing an estimate, but saying "7 or 9" does not sound normal as a way of expressing an estimate (instead you would express it as a range of 7 to 9). Likewise, saying "7, 8, or 9" in English does not sound like an estimate but rather like a ...


1

Learning measure/count words in Chinese is like learning prepositions in English. There are only some basic rules then you're on your "language sense".



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