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16

Even for educated Chinese people who know English fairly well, they do not use the same method that native English speakers use (the one mentioned in your question). The common methods Chinese use include: 1 - Read a small sequence of letters from the alphabet that contains the letter in question. “Theodore怎么拼?” “T-H-...” “等一下,是T还是P” ...


16

If you compare Chinese with English, you will find a lot differences and similarities. Similarities may help you learn Chinese a little bit easily, while differences are the things you need to keep in mind and to get used to. Here are the ways how English/Chinese sentences are constructed. English: Letters ----------------- Words ---- Sentences Chinese: ...


13

Just as @Flake said: In general, "小X" should be used to a person who is younger than you while "老X" to an older person. And here is some additional usages: Generally speaking, 老X is often used to address a male, and 小X can be used for both male & female. 老X can be used to a person who is an acquaintance to you(usually both of you have almost the ...


12

This is a very interesting question. I am sure you can understand that even in English there are tons of ways to greet one single friend. It also differs from regions. Below I am listing some of the typical/common ways we greet people. People you've just met: 你好!= hello. 很高兴认识你! = very glad to meet you. For acquaintances: 你好吗?= how are you doing? ...


12

This does happen every now and then. It is just a way of expressing enthusiasm to see you. And from experience it won't go on forever, usually just a second time, but sometimes people will say "你好, 你好" or even "你好, 你好, 你好" in a row. Think of it as a handshake, it is not going to go on until it is awkward, just showing some enthusiasm with a couple of extra ...


11

I can't even imagine this scenario - but supposing they say 你好, and you replied that is where it should end. If they went on to say 你好吗? You could obviously reply 我很好,你呢? or words to that effect, but that should really be the end of any 你好 exchanges. I've never had a never ending 你好 exchange, and I'd be pretty confident in saying it isn't common. Hope ...


11

My friends use 谢谢 all the time, so even if someone pours them a drink for the 10th time they will still say 谢谢. One thing I noticed when I first started learning was that how I said it sounded too exaggerated, so it was coming across like I was trying to thank someone for saving my life when it was just supposed to be a simple thanks. So maybe try toning it ...


9

Roughly speaking, 洗手间 = bathroom/restroom and 厕所 = toilet. 洗手 literally means wash hands. It's not feminine, it's just more polite as you mentioned. You can use either in most cases. You would use 洗手间 while eating or when talking to someone you don't know very well.


9

May I suggest checking out the ChinaSmack glossary? They have a huge array of colorful language, and there is sure to be something that meets your needs in terms of a curse word there. Just to add, I always hear Chinese girls saying 讨厌 (taoyan) when they are annoyed or frustrated, but it's not exactly the most masculine of statements. 烦 (fan) also seems to ...


7

Well, not sure if this answers your question or not, but I've played a game before involving using idioms (aka 成语) where you have to carry on using the same sound (not including tone) from whatever 成语 the previous person said. For example, if I started with 骑虎难下 (qi hu nan xia - something like stuck between a rock and a hard place) the next person might say ...


7

yes, it is common for many Asia countries that "lodging" (typically dormitories) is provided by the companies and often these "factories" form cities on their own. A famous (or maybe better to say notorious) example is Foxconn. From wikipdia: Foxconn's largest factory worldwide is in Longhua, Shenzhen, where hundreds of thousands of workers (varying ...


6

I have not watched this drama so my interpret may not be accurate. From what is said, this line is self-mockery and ironic, but in a humorous and relaxed tone. 门墩、胖狗、肥丫头 concludes the modest values of Chinese countrymen with a ragged verse. It doesn't look like from any specific reference, at least I am not aware of. However, in modern Chinese literature ...


6

For cursing: "操" is pretty similar to "damn" or "sh*t" in such situation of cursing. Also similar as they should not be used in very formal situations. However, the meaning of "操" is same as the f word in its verb form. "操" should be quite acceptable (or at least ok) in informal scenarios. "靠" has very very close meaning as "操" in this situation. ...


6

In general, "小X" should be used to a person who is younger than you while "老X" to an older person. Such nicknames are often used by a specific group of people. This makes the cases that a person is called "小X" if major members in the group are older than him/her, or vice versa. However, in such a situation, let's take an example: a guy is about 30 years ...


6

Cantonese really has a nice distinction here, between "thanks for doing that", 唔該 (m4 goi1), and 多謝 (do1 ze6) for receiving something of great or tangible value. You'd say 唔該 to a waiter and 多謝 to a co-worker who recommended you for a promotion. In Mandarin, I've always erred towards too polite, saying 谢谢 or 多谢 for everyday interactions and 非常感谢 when I ...


6

It means seven years after marriage, both husband and wife would face numerous temptations that would harm their relationship. The seven years is a vague expression, sometimes a couple gets trouble earlier, sometimes later. There is a movie about this. Wikipedia has some hints too. Its Baidu page tells that it's borrowed from foreign country. Case Study ...


6

Here are loose translations: 好的 = alright! 好吧 = okay, fine... (Kind of like... going along with it) 好啊 = sure! (As Wendy said... a bit more of an upbeat tone) 好 = Okay. 行 = Sure. I guess that works 恩 = Colloquial form of grunting in agreement... kind of like a verbal nod of approval 可以/可以啊 = I can/Sure! Or, if you agree with what someone said... You ...


5

Yes, there is a game like "Crossword". I played such a game in this site. The site is a little famous since it provide this game for the famous newspaper Southern Weekend. Here is a screenshot:


5

Though they are similar in significance they happen on two different dates, and therefore are not interchangeable. 七夕节 is a festival based on a very old myth. The story has many variations but simply put it tells of a young cow herder who is separated from his true love, a weaver maiden by a silver river. On the 7th day of the 7th lunar month they are ...


4

This is not a complete answer, but will probably supplement others you get. While working in Beijing I always heard colleagues greeting each other in the morning with just 早 (zǎo) instead of the full 早上好 (zǎo shang hǎo). This is quite similar to what we do in English, using "morning!" as a greeting instead of "good morning!"


4

This kind of case is usually occurs on these occasions: When you are standing at top of the mountain, you feel very exciting, and shout out with prolonging the each word(like niiiiiii haooooooo maaaaaaa) or just the last word(like ni hao maaaaaaa). Mum, so exciting! :p It usually occurs in young people, especially the female. Some cute girls will often ...


3

Many people live at factories in China because many of them are migrants and it's more economical from their point of view to live in factory dormitories. It's also more efficient for them and their employers to have them on-site. Remember, China is crowded, housing is expensive and commuting is a bear. As for who would want to visit a factory, well many ...


3

I think "寧縱勿枉" best fits the description. It literally means not enforcing justice ("縱" as in "縱容") for fear of accusing someone wrongly ("枉" as in "冤枉"). The opposite phrase is "寧枉勿縱". Note that the sayer does not necessarily forgive the suspect here. 沒有實質證據證明銀包是小明偷的,寧縱勿枉,此事就算了吧。 (There's no direct evidence proving Ming stole the wallet, giving him the ...


3

To be honest, although you could use 学弟, 学妹, etc. to address other students, the most natural way of addressing them (especially when you interact face to face) is by full name. Full names retain a reasonable amount of respect without making it sound too formal. Adding a suffix would only make it overly formal and consequently awkward. For example, full name ...


2

I just want to add some information to the accepted answer as I believe it is imprecise. 小x and 老x are used directly with someone you are familiar with (or speak with regularly, like a colleague). The usage is based not only on age difference but also on the social status, gender, family relation to you and who is your interlocutor. (You will not call ...


2

If this speaking is usually mixed with a drop in tone on the word before, it's just a cutesy speak. Note that the extended word gets elevated tone, but drops to normal tone right before the end. /maaaaaa\ ni\ / \aa \_hao_/ Girls in japanese anime do that all the time.


2

For males or females who are older than yourself are not blood relatives e.g. not 表哥 or 表姐 and are usually unmarried and not quite old enough to be referred to as 阿姨 or 叔叔 then this is someone you might refer to as 大姐 or 大哥. This is normally out of respect to someone who maybe treats you as a younger brother or sister. In certain movies 大哥 is used for a ...


2

The only thing I can add to this is that with close friends you should be wary of using 谢谢 too much! My Chinese friend once told me that, because of our friendship, it should be obvious that we are thankful for the kind things that we each do for one another and that it can actually create the feeling of distance in a relationship rather than closeness. I ...


2

This is a subjective question, to some people polite words 谢谢 or thanks do not mean much of a thing. (It is just 'niceties' making you appear to be 0.1% that much more polite to them) So my verdict: It depends (does not matter whether it is English or Chinese, or whether young or old)


2

Well, I agree that @NS.X said. First, it should be "妈了个巴子", not "妈个巴子". Second, it is much worse than "他妈的". Actually, if you are angry with something, you can say "他妈的", to express your dissatisfied emotion. But please do not use it to a person. However, please do not use "妈了个巴子" even if for a thing, since it is too coarse. Anyway, it is not good to ...



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