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7

Generally putting XX is fine unless formal. People use that a lot orally. X is usually pronounced as 叉, but can vary based on region. Formally and also very commonly for missing name is using 某. 王某 (someone with surname 王 and one-character given name) 王某某 (someone with surname 王 and two-character given name) 某某/某某某 (very general, someone with unknown ...


7

There are Chinese-language-only reasons like the many mutually-unintelligible dialects/topolects, the huge difference between spoken and written Chinese languages, but this doesn't explain why subtitling is ubiquitous, even when the entire show is in perfect Mandarin. This is because subtitles are somewhat required under PRC state authorities, so there are ...


5

Although it looks like an idiom expression (chengyu), I believe it is actually a coined phrase, specifically for the TV adaptation of the Wuxia novel (射鵰英雄傳, 1983 TVB Hongkong) you mentioned. Literally, 鐵血丹心 can translate to "Iron blood scarlet heart". There is the connotation of the conflict between love and patriotism and such, but its a bit far fetched ...


5

The general principle is from top to bottom, from right to left, but the format can be very flexible. For a four-character seal, there are 6 ways to arrange the characters (see picture). Seal calligraphers normally pick the arrangement that is most aesthetically pleasing, depending on how the character is written & number of strokes per character, etc. ...


5

□ (white square) is used to indicate that some characters are missing or unrecognizable. Each white square correspond to one such character. See 虚缺号的用法.


4

Very easy. Use Wikipedia. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is listed as 沃尔夫冈·阿马德乌斯·莫扎特 on Chinese Wikipedia Johann Sebastian Bach is 约翰·塞巴斯蒂安·巴赫 in Chinese. Thomas Alva Edison is transliterated as 托马斯·阿尔瓦·爱迪生 by full name in Chinese. We could continute, but you see the pattern: [first]·[middle]·[last]


3

Geographically, Chinese people say seven continents, as you listed above, except Oceania(大洋洲), which stands for Australasia and almost all small islands in Pacific ocean.


3

Organizations often use 印章 while signatures are used personally. If you are representing an organization, 印章 usually are required, but signature is acceptable for a person representing himself. Example: A bank is providing a loan to me, on the contract there will be bank employee's signature, bank's 印章 and my signature, this is acceptable. Of course, if you ...


3

Usually you would say "bon appetit" at the beginning of the meal. Same applies in Chinese: you can say either 慢慢吃 / 请慢用 / 请 / 慢用 The only time it might cause confusion is when you say it during the middle of the meal


3

If you use this to refer to your close friend, she would probably not get angry with you. But in other cases it seems a little offensive. Well I think this is the "dark side" of the traditional culture. As you said, girls get married mainly at that age, and Chinese parents usually get worried about their daughter's marriage when they grow up. So "being ...


3

In my opinion, it is usually offensive to call someone 剩女 in the face, even when joking. Of course there might be exceptions, for example, a senior family member may possibly use the word 剩女 to urge a child to prioritize marriage, but even in this case the person referred to may feel offended. My advice is to use other expressions that are more euphemistic.


3

Basically I think you are right, but it's a pretty complicated story. There is more than one use of 小姐, including title, term of address, and general noun. I think most of the discussion, including your comments, has been about the general noun, so I'll limit myself to that. Historically, 小姐 could indeed mean 娼妓、歌女. This use goes back to at least the Song ...


2

2015年高考真题:http://wenku.baidu.com/topic/2015gaokao_zhenti 不过需要下载分。 2015年高考真题、答案和其它资源:http://www.eol.cn/html/g/gkst/ 可以直接下载,但是需要在论坛里多找找。 历年高考作文:http://www.gaokao.com/guangdong/gdgkzw/ 另外,请善用百度站内的搜索(百度文库禁止GoogleBot访问):http://wenku.baidu.com/search?word=2015%B8%DF%BF%BC+%CA%FD%D1%A7+%BA%FE%B1%B1 附部分题目: 2015 Essay Prompt Guangdong: 2015年广东卷作文题 ...


2

慢 generally has positive connotations of being deliberate, such as 慢走, "walk slow", which is commonly said before someone departs.


2

because it sounds cute~~~~~~~~~~


2

抢红包: Actually, you can understand "抢红包" like this: many people are scrambling a gift happily. FYI: usually "red envelope" means a small package with money :) 订阅开奖提醒: you can understand it like this: subscribe it and it will send a notice to you when will begin to 抢红包.


2

They're puns. 1: Winter: wear as much as possible, summer: wear as little as possible. 多少 means "how much", but could be read as 多+x "how very x", with x here being 少 (little). 2: 看不上 is ambiguous. She won't give anybody a thought. or Nobody gives her a thought. 3: "... then you just keep waiting." vs. "... then you can wait for your punishment." 4: 喜欢一个人 ...


1

Giving someone "benefit of the doubt" suggests uncertainty as to the motive or intention. If a kid knocks over an ugly vase, and the kid claims it was by accident, you could give the kid the benefit of the doubt, and accept the apology. So what does it mean to give someone the benefit of the doubt? According to the Cambridge dictionary: to ​believe ...


1

I did a little research and found this on "Chinese wikipedia", and translated it for you: Giving out 红包 is a Chinese convention during New year (Festival). In China the color red stands for joy, luck and happiness. Giving out 红包 to someone (usually 18-) means bringing luck and wish to them. And the money in it is only to make kids happy. Below is ...


1

Don't forget 没问题 No problem 可以撒 sure 走起 sure, let's go :D


1

There are two ways to translate a non-Chinese name. The first is to use transliteration with the · character separating name parts. The order of name parts is not changed and the meaning of name parts is irrelevant. That would make it [first]·[middle]·[last] like others have said. The other option is to use a name that follows the Chinese naming ...


1

You made a mistake. Translating a English names to Chinese won't change the order. Thomas Alva Edison is still translated to given-middle-family form as 托马斯·阿尔瓦·爱迪生. Only native Chinese names are family-given ordered, like 屠呦呦(Tu Youyou). Native Chinese surely don't have a middle name.


1

It is translated as given · middle · family I personally think it is rude to reorder people names


1

The title is 好像好像谈恋爱, the TV series or movie is 爱情公寓. Update. The 4th line from the bottom is 问候歌 ("Song of Greetings"). One of the different versions on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F_5F0DcpqP8


1

Basically you can use it whenever you want to say enjoy the meal. Most common use is by waiters. In Chinese dining, dishes are served in turn, not all in one go. So waiters say 请慢用 every time they bring a new dish to your table, no just right before you start. Same applies if you are cooking for your guest. It is also used when you need to leave the party ...


1

It is a polite expression, not liable to cause offence, something like 'enjoy your meal'.


1

1) As @biubiubiu mentioned, the 五年高考·三年模拟 series (in the student community known as “五·三”) is an excellent and authoritative source for past gaokao exams. I don't think there are official resources including complete gaokao exams, and the typical source for students in China are non-official publications like 五·三. 2) The structure and guidelines can be ...


1

There is probably no one reason why red is considered lucky. But one thing that would encourage it is that China has long had good sources of deep red mercury based pigments. In the ancient world, east or west, strong colored dyes and pigments were hard to find, and people liked them. In the Mediterranean world look at the history of Royal Purple made ...


1

There are not just different accents in different regions. There are different spoken languages, using essentially the same written language. And on this point, very distinctive English accents such as Jamaican or deep country accents from Appalachia are sometimes subtitled on American English language television.


1

i'm native speak and talk from personal experience. 印章 is an old word, only appropriate for ancient seals. In modern language, it's called 印。when you print a seal on paper( my bad English ), it's called 盖章。people barely use seals. for example if you are going to buy a mobile phone SIM card (3G or 4G), just sign a couple papers with your name, and you're ...



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