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Even for educated Chinese people who know English fairly well, they do not use the same method that native English speakers use (the one mentioned in your question). The common methods Chinese use include: 1 - Read a small sequence of letters from the alphabet that contains the letter in question. “Theodore怎么拼?” “T-H-...” “等一下,是T还是P” ...


6

Here are loose translations: 好的 = alright! 好吧 = okay, fine... (Kind of like... going along with it) 好啊 = sure! (As Wendy said... a bit more of an upbeat tone) 好 = Okay. 行 = Sure. I guess that works 恩 = Colloquial form of grunting in agreement... kind of like a verbal nod of approval 可以/可以啊 = I can/Sure! Or, if you agree with what someone said... You ...


6

It means seven years after marriage, both husband and wife would face numerous temptations that would harm their relationship. The seven years is a vague expression, sometimes a couple gets trouble earlier, sometimes later. There is a movie about this. Wikipedia has some hints too. Its Baidu page tells that it's borrowed from foreign country. Case Study ...


5

Though they are similar in significance they happen on two different dates, and therefore are not interchangeable. 七夕节 is a festival based on a very old myth. The story has many variations but simply put it tells of a young cow herder who is separated from his true love, a weaver maiden by a silver river. On the 7th day of the 7th lunar month they are ...


3

I think "寧縱勿枉" best fits the description. It literally means not enforcing justice ("縱" as in "縱容") for fear of accusing someone wrongly ("枉" as in "冤枉"). The opposite phrase is "寧枉勿縱". Note that the sayer does not necessarily forgive the suspect here. 沒有實質證據證明銀包是小明偷的,寧縱勿枉,此事就算了吧。 (There's no direct evidence proving Ming stole the wallet, giving him the ...


3

To be honest, although you could use 学弟, 学妹, etc. to address other students, the most natural way of addressing them (especially when you interact face to face) is by full name. Full names retain a reasonable amount of respect without making it sound too formal. Adding a suffix would only make it overly formal and consequently awkward. For example, full name ...


2

Well, I agree that @NS.X said. First, it should be "妈了个巴子", not "妈个巴子". Second, it is much worse than "他妈的". Actually, if you are angry with something, you can say "他妈的", to express your dissatisfied emotion. But please do not use it to a person. However, please do not use "妈了个巴子" even if for a thing, since it is too coarse. Anyway, it is not good to ...


1

Are you sure they can be expressed with the same phrases? I think 既往不咎 is appropriate here. It means: Since your mistake is already committed, I will just forgive you and let it go. 不知者无罪. Another possible sentence goes like: 虽然我不清楚你为何这么做,但是我相信你的本意不是如此(如此 here means 伤害别人)。


1

In short, they were completely different, but they're almost the same in modern life. From Wikipedia: 由於過往女子的命運只能嫁作人婦、相夫教子,因此不少女子都相信牛郎織女的傳說,並希望以織女為榜樣。所以每逢七姐誕,她們都會向七姐獻祭,祈求自己能夠心灵手巧、获得美满姻缘的节日。這也就是“乞巧”這名稱的來源。婦女亦會結綵樓,預備黃銅製成的細針(七孔針),以五色細線對月迎風穿針,穿進了為之得久。久而久之,七夕也成為了「女兒節」。不過,古人乞巧不獨七夕,正月及八九月都可以乞巧,只有宋以後才有七夕乞巧。宋元时期,七夕乞巧节变得很隆重,有专门卖乞巧饰品的市场,称作乞巧市。 ...


1

In China, there isn't an custom of spelling potentially ambiguous letters. But spell them correctly is a "Rigid Demand". The intelligent Chinese invent many method of dealing with it. Repeat Repeat is the most common way to tell confusion. In many occasion, one spell, the other retell and he tell again to check it. Use common word In my experience, letter ...



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