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11

哩勒公蝦毀 This sentence refers to the pronunciation of "What did you say?" in Min-Nan 哩(ㄌㄧ): You 勒(ㄌㄟ): an auxiliary verb 公(ㄍㄨㄥ): say 蝦毀(ㄒㄧㄚ ㄏㄨㄟˇ): what 蛤?! This word equals to "Huh? Could you speak up?". Taiwanese use this word commonly on the Internet because it's the first word choice in Bopomofo input method of "ㄏㄚˊ"


9

From Wikipedia: There is no universally accepted criterion for distinguishing a language from a dialect. My hunch is that in general Chinese politics favors unity, whereas European politics favors separation, thus speakers of Dutch and German would hate to think that they were speaking dialects of the same language. Conversely in general it is useful ...


8

There are many different dialects in China, for many special words in dialects, the "correct" character may not be found (the character has been abandoned in Mandarin), or may be a character but with a different pronunciation from Mandarin, or even can't be found. In fact, the average Chinese person can't tell you what the "correct" character in the dialect ...


8

There is an American guy (I think) who teaches people how to speak Taiwanese on Youtube. He even teaches the native Taiwanese people how to speak 闽南语. You can see the videos here. EDIT: Looks like the playlist is dead. This is the guy https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lJo2OHi6hgs


8

If you're only going one week, just learn some Mandarin. The advantages of learning Mandarin is that there are a lot of free resources, cheap and useful phrase books, and most people you will run into will understand Mandarin. I've been studying Minnanhua (spoken in Fujian and pretty much mutually intelligible with Taiwanese) for about a year and I ...


8

Their meanings are somewhat different. In a few situations, they are interchangeable, but there are many others where you can only use one and not the other. The key difference is that 呗 is much more assertive, even rhetorical, whereas 吧 can be used to express doubt or uncertainty as well. For completeness I'll cover them all. Definitions taken from ...


7

Although I don't speak Hakka (one of my PhD advisors studied a Hong Kong Hakka dialect, so I have a vague idea about it) I live surrounded by Hakka people, in Guangdong, and I go frequently to Taiwan for work. In Taiwan, I noticed that the HSR announcements in Hakka sounded very different from the "regular" Hakka I can hear in Guangdong. There's a bunch of ...


7

In MOST cases... Outside of Beijing, in texts, I believe the 儿 is still pronounced. But you can be sure that in spoken Chinese, it will never be pronounced (unless some kids are trying to mock the access by over accentuating it). I said in MOST cases because there are some words that have simply been adopted by non-Beijing'ers and will always be pronounced ...


7

This is a Taiwanese (Min-nan) utterance. pronunciation: “哩(li) 勒(le) 公(gong) 蝦毀(siann-hue)?” translation word by word: You are saying what-thing? There is a hot Disney movie song FROZEN - Let It Go. Recently, we have a Taiwanese version of it http://youtu.be/23F1iAq__P8 at time slot during 1:18~1:21 There is a similar sentence (only the ...


7

It is probably not the languages/dialects that don't have a corresponding Chinese character, but rather regional slang. The A菜 you see is actually 萵仔菜, or ue-á-tshài in Hokkien. That became became e-á-tshài which led it to be transcribed back into Chinese as A仔菜 and eventually A菜. There is actually a word for Q, but I am not aware of how to type that out on ...


6

Go to the most reliable source -- order the Maryknoll Fathers' set of 3 textbooks with CDs. While it is not exactly comprehensible input in its best form (it's predictible, since it's a book and the order doesn't change), it is the best set of materials currently available, and certainly the most comprehensive. If you have the patience to work through all ...


6

I agree with your friend. I think the correct version is "什么来着". You can find the word"来着",but you can't find the word"来的“ in the dictionary. I think it's popular in northern area(such as 北京,天津,河北,辽宁). I have heard of "什么来着" on the TV and I can understand it, though I have never used "什么来着", either in mandarin or in my dialect. (Not applicable) Of course ...


6

The meaning of "哩勒公蝦毀" (li lei gong xia hui) is "What are you talking about?". And "蛤?!" means "What?". In one orthography of Min Nan (aka Hokkien, Taiwanese, Amoy, etc.), the phrase "哩勒公蝦毀" could be written as "汝咧講啥貨" (ru lie jiang sha huo), which literally means "What things are you talking about?" Its Roman transcription would be "lí leh kóng siáⁿ-hòe" ...


6

Well apparently I got the characters wrong as it should be “跟倒”... It is not part of MSM. It's from 四川话 Documentation: from "四川方言词典": from "成都方言词典":


5

龌龊 wò chuò Meanings: (1) dirty;filthy (2) mean,despicable It's not Shanghai dialect only. It's used a lot in northern China as well.


5

When I was in Jiangsu province (and later, Shanghai), I was interested in learning Shanghainese and other Wu dialects. Unfortunately, there aren't that many resources, and a lot of the ones that do exist are low quality (No IPA, crazy made up romanizations, pronunciations indicated with characters, etc.) Here are a few things I found and my thoughts on them ...


5

As a form of Southwestern Mandarin, you can approach the Chongqing dialect with resources designed for Sichuanese in general. The English Wikipedia gives a lot of resources on "Si4cuan1hua4", including a good overview of the phonology, and a introduction to Sichuanese Pinyin. The Chinese Wikipedia gives a little more detail on the Chengdu-Chongqing dialect. ...


5

No, they're not completely different, but similar in some ways. You should know, all dialects are different. Mandarin Chinese is not a natural language. It grabs pronunciation from Beijing dialect, vocabulary from all the northern dialects, grammar from the articles written by great writers during the New Culture Movement. Modern dialects have only one ...


5

In this case, I think the quote "A language is a dialect with an army and navy" best describes the situation. Since the mainland government considers linguistic unity to be in favor of their ruling, they will consider any spoken variety of Chinese to be a dialect, no matter how different it is from Mandarin (excluding minority languages).


5

Yes there are. Such language in Chinese is referred to as 回回话 Huíhui huà. Thanks to user xiaohouzi79 for pointing out the book Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic By Dru C. Gladney, which is partly viewable on Google Books. This book contains a large appendix, A Select Glossary of Hui Chinese Islamic Terms on pages 393 to 421. Here ...


4

Hope this will help: From a % speakers/opportunity to practice perspective: In the world, 12.44% of the total population speaks Mandarin (obviously heavily skewed by China's massive population, but still 12.44% nonetheless), compared to 4.83% native English speakers, and a measly .89% Cantonese speakers. ...


4

As others have said, 蛮 is not exactly dialectal. Most Chinese speakers would understand what you mean if you use it to mean "quite." However, it should be noted that it is colloquial--it shows up in spoken Chinese but rarely in print, hence your discovery of it on a Chinese TV show. In fact, some native Chinese speakers will confuse 蛮 with 满 when asked to ...


4

There is not much of this available even at bookstores within China. There is even much less for non-background speakers in English. I personally have been lucky enough to get a book from Peking University Press titled "Practical Suzhou Dialect" which also includes English. I tried searching online however this appears to be a one-off. However, you could ...


4

Your pronunciation is correct. This is a common mis-pronunciation in many places in China, not just Shanxi. In fact, this is so common that nearly every modern Chinese input software supports so called "模糊音"(ambiguous pronunciation). The user can config if this function is enabled. Here's a screenshot of the config in Google Pinyin software: As you can ...


4

As answered concisely by StarCub, 齷齪 龌龊 is the Hanzi representation for Shanghainese o co. Yet IMHO to call this word "the Mandarin equivalent" of o co is a bit inappropriate, since from my understanding you are just asking for a Hanzi representation for a dialectal word, yet not its "equivalent" (or synonym, IMHO). A common mistake is to neglect the fact ...


4

It's quite clear that there is no difference between "Ẓ" and "ẓ" in the 1987 成都话方言词典 as you have shown. If you look at page 26 of the dictionary, you can see everything that starts with "ẓ" in the particular Chengdu Pinyin system that they have, listed from ẓán to ẓùn. Really then, this is a typographical question. Looking at the page, you see that there's ...


4

The phrase means "What did you say?"


4

Across the Northern China, 儿 is usually realised as an /r/ sound gluing to the previous sound (and may affect the previous sound in some accents). It is not pronounced independently as a character. In southern China, -儿 construction (or the so-called 儿化) is much less common, which only exists in a few phrases such as 一会儿 (actually I cannot think of a second ...


4

According to the Wikipedia article on bánh pía, which cites this source, pía comes from from the Teochew dialect (i.e., Chaozhouhua 潮州話): The Vietnamese name comes from the Theochew word for pastry, "pia" While I wouldn't necessarily consider this source to be authoritative, I looked up the Teochew pronunciation of 餅 here, and it is indeed pĩã so the ...


4

Before getting into you assumptions I think it's best if we take a look at a post on Language Log from Victor Mair, a name students of Chinese are probably quite familiar with: Cantonese Novels by Victor Mair In my estimation, there is far too little genuine topolectal literature in China. Throughout history, nearly everything has been written ...



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