Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

9

From Wikipedia: There is no universally accepted criterion for distinguishing a language from a dialect. My hunch is that in general Chinese politics favors unity, whereas European politics favors separation, thus speakers of Dutch and German would hate to think that they were speaking dialects of the same language. Conversely in general it is useful ...


8

Their meanings are somewhat different. In a few situations, they are interchangeable, but there are many others where you can only use one and not the other. The key difference is that 呗 is much more assertive, even rhetorical, whereas 吧 can be used to express doubt or uncertainty as well. For completeness I'll cover them all. Definitions taken from ...


7

Although I don't speak Hakka (one of my PhD advisors studied a Hong Kong Hakka dialect, so I have a vague idea about it) I live surrounded by Hakka people, in Guangdong, and I go frequently to Taiwan for work. In Taiwan, I noticed that the HSR announcements in Hakka sounded very different from the "regular" Hakka I can hear in Guangdong. There's a bunch of ...


6

There are many different dialects in China, for many special words in dialects, the "correct" character may not be found (the character has been abandoned in Mandarin), or may be a character but with a different pronunciation from Mandarin, or even can't be found. In fact, the average Chinese person can't tell you what the "correct" character in the dialect ...


6

I agree with your friend. I think the correct version is "什么来着". You can find the word"来着",but you can't find the word"来的“ in the dictionary. I think it's popular in northern area(such as 北京,天津,河北,辽宁). I have heard of "什么来着" on the TV and I can understand it, though I have never used "什么来着", either in mandarin or in my dialect. (Not applicable) Of course ...


6

In MOST cases... Outside of Beijing, in texts, I believe the 儿 is still pronounced. But you can be sure that in spoken Chinese, it will never be pronounced (unless some kids are trying to mock the access by over accentuating it). I said in MOST cases because there are some words that have simply been adopted by non-Beijing'ers and will always be pronounced ...


5

Yes there are. Such language in Chinese is referred to as 回回话 Huíhui huà. Thanks to user xiaohouzi79 for pointing out the book Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic By Dru C. Gladney, which is partly viewable on Google Books. This book contains a large appendix, A Select Glossary of Hui Chinese Islamic Terms on pages 393 to 421. Here ...


5

As a form of Southwestern Mandarin, you can approach the Chongqing dialect with resources designed for Sichuanese in general. The English Wikipedia gives a lot of resources on "Si4cuan1hua4", including a good overview of the phonology, and a introduction to Sichuanese Pinyin. The Chinese Wikipedia gives a little more detail on the Chengdu-Chongqing dialect. ...


4

Hope this will help: From a % speakers/opportunity to practice perspective: In the world, 12.44% of the total population speaks Mandarin (obviously heavily skewed by China's massive population, but still 12.44% nonetheless), compared to 4.83% native English speakers, and a measly .89% Cantonese speakers. ...


4

As others have said, 蛮 is not exactly dialectal. Most Chinese speakers would understand what you mean if you use it to mean "quite." However, it should be noted that it is colloquial--it shows up in spoken Chinese but rarely in print, hence your discovery of it on a Chinese TV show. In fact, some native Chinese speakers will confuse 蛮 with 满 when asked to ...


4

There is not much of this available even at bookstores within China. There is even much less for non-background speakers in English. I personally have been lucky enough to get a book from Peking University Press titled "Practical Suzhou Dialect" which also includes English. I tried searching online however this appears to be a one-off. However, you could ...


4

Your pronunciation is correct. This is a common mis-pronunciation in many places in China, not just Shanxi. In fact, this is so common that nearly every modern Chinese input software supports so called "模糊音"(ambiguous pronunciation). The user can config if this function is enabled. Here's a screenshot of the config in Google Pinyin software: As you can ...


4

In this case, I think the quote "A language is a dialect with an army and navy" best describes the situation. Since the mainland government considers linguistic unity to be in favor of their ruling, they will consider any spoken variety of Chinese to be a dialect, no matter how different it is from Mandarin (excluding minority languages).


4

No, they're not completely different, but similar in some ways. You should know, all dialects are different. Mandarin Chinese is not a natural language. It grabs pronunciation from Beijing dialect, vocabulary from all the northern dialects, grammar from the articles written by great writers during the New Culture Movement. Modern dialects have only one ...


4

As answered concisely by StarCub, 齷齪 龌龊 is the Hanzi representation for Shanghainese o co. Yet IMHO to call this word "the Mandarin equivalent" of o co is a bit inappropriate, since from my understanding you are just asking for a Hanzi representation for a dialectal word, yet not its "equivalent" (or synonym, IMHO). A common mistake is to neglect the fact ...


3

According to the Wikipedia article on bánh pía, which cites this source, pía comes from from the Teochew dialect (i.e., Chaozhouhua 潮州話): The Vietnamese name comes from the Theochew word for pastry, "pia" While I wouldn't necessarily consider this source to be authoritative, I looked up the Teochew pronunciation of 餅 here, and it is indeed pĩã so the ...


3

Nanjing has a very good education environment. Most of the famous universities of Jiangsu province locate at Nanjing. So Mandarin is wildly used in Nanjing and most of the young people are well educated there( this means they can speak English). They may speack Nanjing dialect with their parents and friends, but they can also switch to Mandarin as soon as ...


3

Across the Northern China, 儿 is usually realised as an /r/ sound gluing to the previous sound (and may affect the previous sound in some accents). It is not pronounced independently as a character. In southern China, -儿 construction (or the so-called 儿化) is much less common, which only exists in a few phrases such as 一会儿 (actually I cannot think of a second ...


3

Answer to each question "When Beijingers use words like…" Assume that by "Beijingers", you mean those who born in or near Beijing, so do their parents or close relatives, growing up in a Beijing native people community, and not necessarily living in Beijing all the time of a year. "When Beijingers use words like 一点儿, the ending syllable will be very ...


2

Your supposition about the "来的" is undoubtedly right! I am a native living in Guangzhou. It's very "normal" to say "这 是 什么 来的" to mean "What is it" in the Cantonese-speaking area due to the influence of the Cantonese construction "呢個 係 乜嘢 嚟嘅".You could say "来的" is a Cantonese-Mandarin粤式普通话. "来着" is a northern colloquial functional word to imply old ...


2

It depends on your purpose of learning Chinese, it is a tool or a research. Learning different dialects enables you learning the trend of Chinese pronunciation history. Also to quickly join local society, foreign people who speaks dialect is considered more friendly. Actually standardized Mandarin (普通话) is a combination of dialects that are used by ...


2

While I am not aware of any studies, I would add this: From my own experience of trying to learn other dialects beyond Mandarin (Taiwanese, Cantonese), as well as simplified along with traditional characters, I'd tend to agree with the previous paradigm. The reason is that there is so much to learn in a single dialect that starting on another one would ...


2

I guess it's Teochew (潮汕话 / 潮州话), a southern language in Guangdong and Taiwan. There're actually many Teochew people living in HK. HKers call them Chiuchow people (潮州人). You can ask the local friends to know more about them and their language. :)


2

I find two meanings of "indecisive" in the dictionary. To hover between different choices and can't make a decision in a short while. Not specified, undefined. I think you are asking a word for the first meaning, and then the words are: 犹豫不决 优柔寡断 没主见* 徘徊不定 犹豫 There are some other words related to this meaning, in different ...


2

I am from the south and I only use 什么来着 (never heard of 什么来的). My friends use 什么来着 all the time, usually in the following situation: 你给上次来我们公司的律师打个电话。Call the lawyer that came to our company last time. 那个人叫什么来着?What's his name? I think there are two reasons you might have seen misleading search results regarding 什么来的. Some have asked questions ...


2

I can only speak from my experience. But I suggest If you are going to live in Hong Kong for a long time, learn Cantonese Otherwise learn Mandarin I started learning Mandarin back in the UK, but ended up living in Hong Kong for 3.5 years. Through hard work my Mandarin has improved, but Hong Kong is not a good place to learn Mandarin. A few reasons why ...


1

Shenzhen is the United Nation of China -- take the subway and in any car you will hear a dozen languages and dialects. The whole of China is represented there -- from Guangdong people, of course (not all of them being fluent in Cantonese, there's a whole bunch of Guangdong-born Hakka and Chaozhou people in Shenzhen) to neighboring Guangxi (lots of them in ...


1

I don't know anything about 磨. :( Note that those terms listed by Huang refer to a state instead of describing someone's characteristics. They have some subtle differences between the states described by them. I'll let Huang to explain the differences between the 4 character terms. 没主见 basically means "no opinion". I'd say "他常常都犹豫不决" or "他常常都不能决定的" to ...


1

I started to use "来着" after I came to Beijing from Henan. I use "来着" when I should know something, but I cannot remember. e.g. 他叫什么来着?让我想想。 "I should know who he is, but I just cannot recall his name. Let me think for a while." Ask when the listener seems to have forgotten something. e.g. 昨天我说什么来着?我说了xxxx "You must have forgotten what I said yesterday. I ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible