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5

Zhang Jiqing singing Kunqu, always a pleasure to listen to. The 也 here is the sentence final particle. It's used quite differently in vernacular literature in the Ming-Qing than it is in classical literature, where it's almost like a copula. The references from 漢語大辭典 are talking about the use of 也 as a loan character for 匜, which is pronounced yi. This ...


3

There is a better link to the article that is quoted above in this post on Sina Blog, which will let you search the whole article in your browser. The article mentions the use of 合音字 in Qionglai and related Sichuan dialects, i.e. one character writing two syllables. Examples the author gives include “不晓” 写作 “表”,and “那样” 写作 “浪”. Possibly 娘 is simply a 合音字 ...


2

As Claw says, 去 is the historical character for it. This could come from 文白异读, that is, literary/colloquial readings. That would make sense, because colloquial readings are often either more innovative, or are a throwback. Another option would be borrowing it from another variety, e.g. Cantonese keoi.


1

Michaelyus's answer to a similar question (link in the comments above) is still very useful. A general resource that unfortunately may be hard to find now is the 現代方言音庫, a series published by the 上海教育出版社 in the mid 1990s. This series consisted of a thin booklet titled XX音檔 (usu 100-150 pages) and a good quality cassette for each dialect. The series ...


1

Here's a partially supported theory. I hope someone comes up with better evidence: The closest translation of 什么 into 成都话 is 啥(子) = sa˩˧ tsɿ˥˧. I believe that the 娘 in question is actually 哪 in a certain context. For evidence, I give the following example. 怎样 is 哪个样(子) = naŋ˥˧ ko˩˧ iaŋ˩˧ tsɿ˥˧. I don't have the foggiest clue why 哪 is only in some ...


1

Similar to Hokkien, there are many Hakka dlalects in Canton and Taiwan. The 1st large dialect which is used in public announcements in Taiwan called Sixien (Siyen or Xi ien, which means "four counties (near Meixian, Guangdong)") is similar to dialects in Meizhou area. They are classfied to Yuetai (Canton-Taiwan) dialect. However, Hong Kong Hakka is not in ...



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