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11

哩勒公蝦毀 This sentence refers to the pronunciation of "What did you say?" in Min-Nan 哩(ㄌㄧ): You 勒(ㄌㄟ): an auxiliary verb 公(ㄍㄨㄥ): say 蝦毀(ㄒㄧㄚ ㄏㄨㄟˇ): what 蛤?! This word equals to "Huh? Could you speak up?". Taiwanese use this word commonly on the Internet because it's the first word choice in Bopomofo input method of "ㄏㄚˊ"


7

It is probably not the languages/dialects that don't have a corresponding Chinese character, but rather regional slang. The A菜 you see is actually 萵仔菜, or ue-á-tshài in Hokkien. That became became e-á-tshài which led it to be transcribed back into Chinese as A仔菜 and eventually A菜. There is actually a word for Q, but I am not aware of how to type that out on ...


7

What you call "literary Chinese" is actually classical Chinese, a rather static language that evolved 2500 years ago and has since been used as a model language in education, rituals and other rather fixed events. Classical Chinese is therefore akin to Latin in Europe, actually covering approximately the same time span and the same usage. You can pronounce ...


7

This is a Taiwanese (Min-nan) utterance. pronunciation: “哩(li) 勒(le) 公(gong) 蝦毀(siann-hue)?” translation word by word: You are saying what-thing? There is a hot Disney movie song FROZEN - Let It Go. Recently, we have a Taiwanese version of it http://youtu.be/23F1iAq__P8 at time slot during 1:18~1:21 There is a similar sentence (only the ...


6

The meaning of "哩勒公蝦毀" (li lei gong xia hui) is "What are you talking about?". And "蛤?!" means "What?". In one orthography of Min Nan (aka Hokkien, Taiwanese, Amoy, etc.), the phrase "哩勒公蝦毀" could be written as "汝咧講啥貨" (ru lie jiang sha huo), which literally means "What things are you talking about?" Its Roman transcription would be "lí leh kóng siáⁿ-hòe" ...


6

Well apparently I got the characters wrong as it should be “跟倒”... It is not part of MSM. It's from 四川话 Documentation: from "四川方言词典": from "成都方言词典":


5

愛人跟人走 my love has gone with someone else 離開已經三年後 It's already 3 years since you left me; 你煞有去無回頭 you gone away without turning back 真是乎人想抹到 [This] really is unexpected. 心肝親像磅心的菜頭 My heart is like a broken radish 想抹到想抹到 I couldn't imagine, I couldn't imagine 你會去跟人走 You would go away with someone else. 無彩我無彩我 You didn't care for me, you didn't care for me, ...


4

The phrase means "What did you say?"


4

It's quite clear that there is no difference between "Ẓ" and "ẓ" in the 1987 成都话方言词典 as you have shown. If you look at page 26 of the dictionary, you can see everything that starts with "ẓ" in the particular Chengdu Pinyin system that they have, listed from ẓán to ẓùn. Really then, this is a typographical question. Looking at the page, you see that there's ...


4

Check out Ethnologue - http://www.ethnologue.com/country/CN/languages . For specific information on each Chinese minority language click on "More information" i.e. for Narua (6b (Threatened). Language of recognized nationality: Mongolian. Sichuan Province speakers assigned to the Mongolian nationality. Language of recognized nationality: Naxi. Yunnan ...


4

Before getting into you assumptions I think it's best if we take a look at a post on Language Log from Victor Mair, a name students of Chinese are probably quite familiar with: Cantonese Novels by Victor Mair In my estimation, there is far too little genuine topolectal literature in China. Throughout history, nearly everything has been written ...


4

Modern Cantonese is generally considered not to have tone sandhi (in Chinese, 變調, but also more specifically 連續變調), that is to say, changes in the tonal values when in certain phonetic contexts. Cantonese does have a phenomenon of lexical derivation which involves a change of tone, known as 變音 or changed tone; many discussions consider both these tone ...


4

nóo vs. ló These two are both for literary pronunciation. Since 白頭偕老(白头偕老) is a traditional Chinese idiomatic expression (成語 Chengyu), we tend to pronounce it in the literary way. The difference between these two might be in the sub-dialect aspect. I'd pronounce it as pe̍h-thâu-kai-ló since it's easier for me to pronounce. But I reckon that ...


4

Beijing opera was not invented in the capital, but was largely imported from Anhui and other parts of the country, and then it evolved with further influences from other regions. Certain pieces may therefore retain local accents, like Jiang-Huai (江淮官话) above, although the music itself makes it possible to just twist and distort the syllables.


3

On the web, standard Chinese is widely used. Simplified Chinese is used by Mainland china; Traditional Chinese is used more frequently in places like Taiwan. But the two speak the same way, so it doesn't matter. Another trend is that more and more sentences are created by young guys on the internet, and the sentences are widely spreading on the web, so that ...


3

I had a second (tenth?) listen, and extracted the sound to an mp3. Then I put this through Praat. I noticed something interesting: This is the first occurrence of 來, around 72 seconds in: 齐家吃开晓来称赞 This is the second occurrence of 來, around 121 seconds in: 明星或歌星日日来帮衬 The first one is definitely [lɔi], whereas the second one is definitely [lei], and ...


3

Well, "我们跟到就走" is not widely used and seems wired. Maybe you should provide more context. "跟到" means "arrive" or "as soon as I/we finish doing something". I would like to translate "我们跟到就走" into "We will leave here as soon as I/we finish doing something/dressing/packaging/etc". Update to answer more precisely: it's not the Modern Standard Mandarin, and it ...


3

In modern Shanghainese and some other of Wu dialects, the adherence to the five tones has basically diminished in speech (still exists when referring to single characters), and converted into three pitches(low, mid, high). Pitches for the same character, however, do vary through speech. For example, notice how the pitch for character 大's one pronunciation ...


3

稀罕 and 稀奇 are not the same thing. The verb 稀罕 means "to value"; using it as a negative therefore express disdain. The translation given of "I don't care about your money" is quite spot on. I assume you aren't asking for a "better" translation for this. The adjective 稀奇 means "rare", "unusual". It is not grammatically proper in Standard Chinese to use 稀奇 as ...


3

我在网上找了一下,你提到的这篇文章标题是《死都没人爱的9种女人》,事实上它有“正常中文”版本的原文: 其实还可以搜索到一篇内容十分类似的文章《十种汉子该暴挨,你属于那一种?》,前者应该只是把后者内容当中的“男人”替换成了“女人”。而后者2006年左右就出现在网络上了,这种类型的文章作为段子实在是很过时。现在的大多数网民应该都不会觉得这篇文章有趣。 至于你提到的这种“奇怪的中文”的版本,确实网上可以搜索到: 这应当是通过某种类似于在线翻译的方式由电脑自动转换的,在网上还可以搜索到一些类似风格的文章。我不清楚这些网站在转载时进行这种转换的原因。不过显然这并不是为了有趣,也不是标准汉语的特殊形式,也不是所谓网络语言。应该说,就是网络上的一种信息垃圾。不用去深究,也不要把它作为学习中文的参考。


2

In the region where I was born (Xicheng, Beijing), we don't use 稀奇 as a verb (I have never heard any). Using 稀罕 as a verb sounds also "weird" to me but I do understand the meaning and I have heard some people saying this (but none from my family or my friends around). I think it is more like a local expression from somewhere else. A proper translation of 稀罕 ...


2

Is there a difference between "Ẓ" and "ẓ"? After a thorough review of several texts and online sources I cannot find any evidence of a significant difference in the usage between the uppercase and the lowercase Z with a diacritic dot below the letter. I think the context is pertinent in discovering the intent of the usage (Can you share the textual ...


2

You could look at Tianjin, as close as 120 km from Beijing. The local Tianjin dialect is still exhibiting rather drastic changes to tones and tone changes. Drawing from your example, mandarin in Beijing and Tianjin differ in tones according to the following, with TJ accent being much more low-pitched: 1st tone = 55 (BJ), 21 (TJ) 2nd tone = 35 3rd tone = ...


2

From Wiki(https://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%9B%9B%E5%B7%9D%E8%AF%9D#.E5.8F.98.E8.B0.83): 连读变调现象在四川话口语中十分常见,但各地略有差异,以成渝片为例,大致来说四川话中的变调可以分为4类。 一是重叠词中的变调,一般而言如果组成该重叠词的字声调为阳平或去声,则第二个字变调为阴平(例词:爸爸[pa2pa1]、婆婆[pʰo2pʰo1]、舅舅[tɕiəu4tɕiəu1]、帕帕[pʰa4pʰa1]);同时,如果组成该重叠词的字声调为上声,第二个字变调为阳平(例词:姐姐[tɕiai3tɕiai2]、板板[pan3pan2])。 ...


2

From 成都方言词典| 现代汉语方言大词典·分卷: · The correct character, from the world of academia, is '嘎'. · Sichuanese Pinyin is: gā · It is a contraction of '该是哈' · It means 'isn't that so' or 'isn't that right' - equivalent to the how people in English say "you know what I mean?" at the end of sentences. · Also has the connotation of 'hoping that the listener will ...


2

In Sichuan, 跟到 means sooner - indicating that something is gonna happen soon or sooner.


2

Correction 我下课以后常常去实习 ( i often go to intern-ship whenever the class is finish ). 实习以后我还有一堂课(After the inter-ship i still have a lesson). 我的最后一堂课有时会在六点钟结束,而其它天都会在八点钟结束。 (My last lesson will ended at 6 o'Clock sometimes,while others day will ended at 8 o'Clock) . 然后我就会开始做作业。(Then i will start to do my homework) . 每周至少有一天我都会有个Amnesty International会议. (At ...


1

I'm Chinese native student, show me the English original text if possible. 我下课以后常常去实习。 我以后我的实习我有课一遍(I can't quite understand this sentience)。 我的最后一节课有时六点结束,其它时间八点结束。(it's suggested to state if the time is pm. or am.) 然后(我常常is unnecessary)开始我的家庭作业。 每个星期我有至少有一次Amnesty International会议. 这是我跟我的男朋友建立(we say 建立 instead of 开始 to express the meaning of ...


1

The word tuè/tè in Taiwanese Hokkien is used in contexts where 跟 in Mandarin more explicitly refers to the action of "following"; in the 台灣閩南語常用詞辭典 you can find the word kin-tuè/kun-tè, as written 跟綴. In the 台文/華文線頂辭典, a fuller list of words with 綴 can be found. Perhaps most indicative of its use is the Taiwanese Hokkien equivalent of 跟得上, which is 綴會著 ...


1

The difference between vernacular Chinese and literary Chinese is all about written form. It has nothing to do with spoken language (mandarin or other dialects). Therefore we should say vernacular written form and literary written form. The fact is that the literary written form is not for a natural human language at all. It is just for the official ...



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