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8

拔(pronunciation only. Not sure how to write.)。 e.g. 面条放冷水里拔一下 焯是过热水。


7

What you call "literary Chinese" is actually classical Chinese, a rather static language that evolved 2500 years ago and has since been used as a model language in education, rituals and other rather fixed events. Classical Chinese is therefore akin to Latin in Europe, actually covering approximately the same time span and the same usage. You can pronounce ...


6

拜了个拜 derives from 拜拜 by treating the first 拜 as a verb and the second 拜 as the object of the first 拜 and then adopting the verb+(quantity)个+object pattern. 拜拜 is just a loan word from English bye-bye and mean the same thing. 拜了个拜 is just a novel usage of the word.


5

People can carry on a conversation speaking whatever language they are comfortable with, if they can understand each other's language. This happens ALL the time in immigrant families all over the world. A typical situation is: Parents move from country A to country B, and are native speakers of A but have a good understanding of B. Their children, growing up ...


5

Zhang Jiqing singing Kunqu, always a pleasure to listen to. The 也 here is the sentence final particle. It's used quite differently in vernacular literature in the Ming-Qing than it is in classical literature, where it's almost like a copula. The references from 漢語大辭典 are talking about the use of 也 as a loan character for 匜, which is pronounced yi. This ...


4

Beijing opera was not invented in the capital, but was largely imported from Anhui and other parts of the country, and then it evolved with further influences from other regions. Certain pieces may therefore retain local accents, like Jiang-Huai (江淮官话) above, although the music itself makes it possible to just twist and distort the syllables.


4

I am not sure, but probably the Shanghai dialect (上海话), which is said to have only two tones or rather pitch accents: low and high.


4

No other significance than being a historical language and script of interest to academia. As such, it has a given role in Unicode.


4

The term Mandarin (普通话) denotes a dialect which is now the official spoken language of the People's Republic of China and used in most of the China mainland. But it was only the dialect of the Manchu People and not widely used before the Qing Dynasty. The term Chinese language (汉语) is a broader concept than Mandarin. All languages listed on this page can be ...


3

Here are some documents about Nantong dialect, but it's still difficult for Chinese in other areas. http://wapwenku.baidu.com/view/09e3c92aaaea998fcc220e42.html?ssid=0&from=1099b&uid=0&pu=usm@3,sz@1320_2001,ta@iphone_1_9.2_3_601&bd_page_type=1&baiduid=2B26F0FC87EAF856CC6D8FCB7EA56F60&tj=wenku_3_0_10_title#2


3

I don't have a reference handy. But as other commenters have stated, it's probably a regional form the word that means "to drink" in Mandarin and is written 喝. Words for "to eat" and "to drink" tend to cross over a certain amount between those exact senses. As for the sound that reminds you of hou, the open final -e in Mandarin is a rather rare sound in ...


3

Arguably 东干语 is an example, which has only three tones. The first and the second one in mandarin is merged. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dungan_language


3

There is a better link to the article that is quoted above in this post on Sina Blog, which will let you search the whole article in your browser. The article mentions the use of 合音字 in Qionglai and related Sichuan dialects, i.e. one character writing two syllables. Examples the author gives include “不晓” 写作 “表”,and “那样” 写作 “浪”. Possibly 娘 is simply a 合音字 ...


3

When you are talking about 成都话, the first tone (阴平) follows the following rules: 1) The regular case for the first tone is 45. When you are reading a single character, you should use 45. 2) When the character is part of a phrase or a sentence, it may change. Specifically, when a first tone character A is preceded by another first tone character B, A is ...


3

According to Wikipedia:Chinese language Chinese Listeni/tʃaɪˈniːz/ (汉语 / 漢語; Hànyǔ or 中文; Zhōngwén) is a group of related but in many cases mutually unintelligible language varieties, forming a branch of the Sino-Tibetan language family So technically, Chinese is not one language but a group of them and asking "which language, Cantonese or Mandarin?" ...


2

"拜了个拜" has the almost same meaning with "拜拜"(bye-bye), and the word "了个" in it is just to make it sounds funny, not "had a", though in normal cases it's indeed translated into "had a". ...This pattern is now popular in Chinese slang.


2

Well, it can simply translated into "Had a goodbye". Some other examples: "冲/洗了个藻" -> "Had a shower/bath" "洗了洗手" -> "Had a hand washing", "睡了个觉" -> "Had a sleep", "吃了个饭" "Had a meal". Nah, I don't think it's a dialect, more like to be an oral expression, very uncommon in written language, this kind of expression usually come with an attitude of not a big ...


2

"拜拜" comes from the English word "bye-bye". "拜了个拜" is actually a joking form of "拜拜", which actually isn't "correct" in Chinese grammar. This expression got popular from a Chinese translation for a sentence in Japanese comeday animiation (日和动漫). The guy tried translating a sentence into "不是吧!" (This must be kidding me!). But he found it doesn't fit the ...


2

Most native Chinese will resort "儿" sound to Beijing dialect. The tail sound "儿" didn't add any additional meaning to the meaning in most cases. With or without a "儿" only differs in the slight Emotion variations towards the listeners, which is quite subjective.


2

As Claw says, 去 is the historical character for it. This could come from 文白异读, that is, literary/colloquial readings. That would make sense, because colloquial readings are often either more innovative, or are a throwback. Another option would be borrowing it from another variety, e.g. Cantonese keoi.


2

Chong Sau Lin's Hakka is a bit different from standard (Meixian) Hakka. In particular, [ɛu] is replaced by [iau] or [iu]. 1) As others have said, 唱带 means music tapes. 2) 镭 lui = 钱 cen (money) in Malaysia/Singapore, derived from duit, the Dutch coin, through Malay. There isn't a Chinese word for it, so they use 镭 for the sound. Then it makes more sense: ...


1

To a certain degree. In old times there is no one official dialect that is required by the government. So the more sophisticated people generally have aquire the ability to understand more than one dialect.


1

I'm a Cantonese and I can read the lyrics, great. There are mistakes in the song lyrics: 海南鸡饭 *台湾最近叻歌星数不完 张惠妹称霸哂歌坛 面对香港四大天王 还有新一斑 <-- should be 班 还有SPICE GIRL外国好鬼出名 BACKSTREET BOY只只讲晓弹 看下大马有几只人 同佢丢争两餐 自家歌声差人有限 去开一间海南鸡饭 人客爱招呼冇态慢 <-- should be 怠慢? 明星或歌星日日来帮衬 Mandarin Translation: 海南鸡饭 台湾最近红的歌星数不完 张惠妹称霸了歌坛 面对香港四大天王 还有新一班 还有 SPICE GIRL 外国好有名 ...


1

Michaelyus's answer to a similar question (link in the comments above) is still very useful. A general resource that unfortunately may be hard to find now is the 現代方言音庫, a series published by the 上海教育出版社 in the mid 1990s. This series consisted of a thin booklet titled XX音檔 (usu 100-150 pages) and a good quality cassette for each dialect. The series ...


1

It used to be quite local in the northeast, but now gets used all over the places. It can mean showing off, attracting attention deliberately, and/or doing something without considering the impact. It's an informal but quite popular word now.


1

I believe the core of the meaning is overly expressive with gallantry or proudness. Although the most common usages are when guys showing off in front of girls, it can be used in other contexts as well. For example if someone keeps talking proudly about some small deed to his friends, they may react with '你今天怎么这么嘚瑟?', which could be a neutral question, or ...


1

Here's a partially supported theory. I hope someone comes up with better evidence: The closest translation of 什么 into 成都话 is 啥(子) = sa˩˧ tsɿ˥˧. I believe that the 娘 in question is actually 哪 in a certain context. For evidence, I give the following example. 怎样 is 哪个样(子) = naŋ˥˧ ko˩˧ iaŋ˩˧ tsɿ˥˧. I don't have the foggiest clue why 哪 is only in some ...


1

Similar to Hokkien, there are many Hakka dlalects in Canton and Taiwan. The 1st large dialect which is used in public announcements in Taiwan called Sixien (Siyen or Xi ien, which means "four counties (near Meixian, Guangdong)") is similar to dialects in Meizhou area. They are classfied to Yuetai (Canton-Taiwan) dialect. However, Hong Kong Hakka is not in ...


1

It is different from place to place, and there is no standard. Normally, it won't appear in official announcements, laws, scientific publications, etc. But it is widely used in daily life. For native Chinese, when we move from one place to another, even if it is nearer, we still need time to get use to it, at the same time when we get use to the local ...


1

This is because they want to make the sound a little bit louder, because in the past there is no electric amplifier. In the example, the changes are (1) from "ng" to "n", so that the nasal coda is lighter. (2) push vowel from "e" to "a" "o" because the mouth opens wider.



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