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11

哩勒公蝦毀 This sentence refers to the pronunciation of "What did you say?" in Min-Nan 哩(ㄌㄧ): You 勒(ㄌㄟ): an auxiliary verb 公(ㄍㄨㄥ): say 蝦毀(ㄒㄧㄚ ㄏㄨㄟˇ): what 蛤?! This word equals to "Huh? Could you speak up?". Taiwanese use this word commonly on the Internet because it's the first word choice in Bopomofo input method of "ㄏㄚˊ"


8

Their meanings are somewhat different. In a few situations, they are interchangeable, but there are many others where you can only use one and not the other. The key difference is that 呗 is much more assertive, even rhetorical, whereas 吧 can be used to express doubt or uncertainty as well. For completeness I'll cover them all. Definitions taken from ...


7

It is probably not the languages/dialects that don't have a corresponding Chinese character, but rather regional slang. The A菜 you see is actually 萵仔菜, or ue-á-tshài in Hokkien. That became became e-á-tshài which led it to be transcribed back into Chinese as A仔菜 and eventually A菜. There is actually a word for Q, but I am not aware of how to type that out on ...


7

This is a Taiwanese (Min-nan) utterance. pronunciation: “哩(li) 勒(le) 公(gong) 蝦毀(siann-hue)?” translation word by word: You are saying what-thing? There is a hot Disney movie song FROZEN - Let It Go. Recently, we have a Taiwanese version of it http://youtu.be/23F1iAq__P8 at time slot during 1:18~1:21 There is a similar sentence (only the ...


6

The meaning of "哩勒公蝦毀" (li lei gong xia hui) is "What are you talking about?". And "蛤?!" means "What?". In one orthography of Min Nan (aka Hokkien, Taiwanese, Amoy, etc.), the phrase "哩勒公蝦毀" could be written as "汝咧講啥貨" (ru lie jiang sha huo), which literally means "What things are you talking about?" Its Roman transcription would be "lí leh kóng siáⁿ-hòe" ...


6

Well apparently I got the characters wrong as it should be “跟倒”... It is not part of MSM. It's from 四川话 Documentation: from "四川方言词典": from "成都方言词典":


5

愛人跟人走 my love has gone with someone else 離開已經三年後 It's already 3 years since you left me; 你煞有去無回頭 you gone away without turning back 真是乎人想抹到 [This] really is unexpected. 心肝親像磅心的菜頭 My heart is like a broken radish 想抹到想抹到 I couldn't imagine, I couldn't imagine 你會去跟人走 You would go away with someone else. 無彩我無彩我 You didn't care for me, you didn't care for me, ...


5

Yes there are. Such language in Chinese is referred to as 回回话 Huíhui huà. Thanks to user xiaohouzi79 for pointing out the book Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic By Dru C. Gladney, which is partly viewable on Google Books. This book contains a large appendix, A Select Glossary of Hui Chinese Islamic Terms on pages 393 to 421. Here ...


4

The phrase means "What did you say?"


4

It's quite clear that there is no difference between "Ẓ" and "ẓ" in the 1987 成都话方言词典 as you have shown. If you look at page 26 of the dictionary, you can see everything that starts with "ẓ" in the particular Chengdu Pinyin system that they have, listed from ẓán to ẓùn. Really then, this is a typographical question. Looking at the page, you see that there's ...


4

Check out Ethnologue - http://www.ethnologue.com/country/CN/languages . For specific information on each Chinese minority language click on "More information" i.e. for Narua (6b (Threatened). Language of recognized nationality: Mongolian. Sichuan Province speakers assigned to the Mongolian nationality. Language of recognized nationality: Naxi. Yunnan ...


4

Before getting into you assumptions I think it's best if we take a look at a post on Language Log from Victor Mair, a name students of Chinese are probably quite familiar with: Cantonese Novels by Victor Mair In my estimation, there is far too little genuine topolectal literature in China. Throughout history, nearly everything has been written ...


4

According to the Wikipedia article on bánh pía, which cites this source, pía comes from from the Teochew dialect (i.e., Chaozhouhua 潮州話): The Vietnamese name comes from the Theochew word for pastry, "pia" While I wouldn't necessarily consider this source to be authoritative, I looked up the Teochew pronunciation of 餅 here, and it is indeed pĩã so the ...


4

Modern Cantonese is generally considered not to have tone sandhi (in Chinese, 變調, but also more specifically 連續變調), that is to say, changes in the tonal values when in certain phonetic contexts. Cantonese does have a phenomenon of lexical derivation which involves a change of tone, known as 變音 or changed tone; many discussions consider both these tone ...


3

I had a second (tenth?) listen, and extracted the sound to an mp3. Then I put this through Praat. I noticed something interesting: This is the first occurrence of 來, around 72 seconds in: 齐家吃开晓来称赞 This is the second occurrence of 來, around 121 seconds in: 明星或歌星日日来帮衬 The first one is definitely [lɔi], whereas the second one is definitely [lei], and ...


3

Well, "我们跟到就走" is not widely used and seems wired. Maybe you should provide more context. "跟到" means "arrive" or "as soon as I/we finish doing something". I would like to translate "我们跟到就走" into "We will leave here as soon as I/we finish doing something/dressing/packaging/etc". Update to answer more precisely: it's not the Modern Standard Mandarin, and it ...


3

In modern Shanghainese and some other of Wu dialects, the adherence to the five tones has basically diminished in speech (still exists when referring to single characters), and converted into three pitches(low, mid, high). Pitches for the same character, however, do vary through speech. For example, notice how the pitch for character 大's one pronunciation ...


3

稀罕 and 稀奇 are not the same thing. The verb 稀罕 means "to value"; using it as a negative therefore express disdain. The translation given of "I don't care about your money" is quite spot on. I assume you aren't asking for a "better" translation for this. The adjective 稀奇 means "rare", "unusual". It is not grammatically proper in Standard Chinese to use 稀奇 as ...


2

In the region where I was born (Xicheng, Beijing), we don't use 稀奇 as a verb (I have never heard any). Using 稀罕 as a verb sounds also "weird" to me but I do understand the meaning and I have heard some people saying this (but none from my family or my friends around). I think it is more like a local expression from somewhere else. A proper translation of 稀罕 ...


2

Is there a difference between "Ẓ" and "ẓ"? After a thorough review of several texts and online sources I cannot find any evidence of a significant difference in the usage between the uppercase and the lowercase Z with a diacritic dot below the letter. I think the context is pertinent in discovering the intent of the usage (Can you share the textual ...


2

XiaMen University publishes a couple books on MinNanHua, they use their own pinyin which will make sense if you have studied some Mandarin but in any case is often clearer than the Peh-oh-je the Taiwanese missions use. The amazon.cn link is here (Not an associate link) You can also look at these: Hokkien Learn Hokkien


2

From Wiki(https://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%9B%9B%E5%B7%9D%E8%AF%9D#.E5.8F.98.E8.B0.83): 连读变调现象在四川话口语中十分常见,但各地略有差异,以成渝片为例,大致来说四川话中的变调可以分为4类。 一是重叠词中的变调,一般而言如果组成该重叠词的字声调为阳平或去声,则第二个字变调为阴平(例词:爸爸[pa2pa1]、婆婆[pʰo2pʰo1]、舅舅[tɕiəu4tɕiəu1]、帕帕[pʰa4pʰa1]);同时,如果组成该重叠词的字声调为上声,第二个字变调为阳平(例词:姐姐[tɕiai3tɕiai2]、板板[pan3pan2])。 ...


2

You could look at Tianjin, as close as 120 km from Beijing. The local Tianjin dialect is still exhibiting rather drastic changes to tones and tone changes. Drawing from your example, mandarin in Beijing and Tianjin differ in tones according to the following, with TJ accent being much more low-pitched: 1st tone = 55 (BJ), 21 (TJ) 2nd tone = 35 3rd tone = ...


2

From 成都方言词典| 现代汉语方言大词典·分卷: · The correct character, from the world of academia, is '嘎'. · Sichuanese Pinyin is: gā · It is a contraction of '该是哈' · It means 'isn't that so' or 'isn't that right' - equivalent to the how people in English say "you know what I mean?" at the end of sentences. · Also has the connotation of 'hoping that the listener will ...


2

In Sichuan, 跟到 means sooner - indicating that something is gonna happen soon or sooner.


1

The word tuè/tè in Taiwanese Hokkien is used in contexts where 跟 in Mandarin more explicitly refers to the action of "following"; in the 台灣閩南語常用詞辭典 you can find the word kin-tuè/kun-tè, as written 跟綴. In the 台文/華文線頂辭典, a fuller list of words with 綴 can be found. Perhaps most indicative of its use is the Taiwanese Hokkien equivalent of 跟得上, which is 綴會著 ...


1

You might be interested to know that for some of the minority (non-sinitic) languages of China with tonal systems, tone letters are used rather than marks or numbers. Two examples are Zhuang and Hmong (Miao). Some examples: Northern Zhuang na [na24] ‘thick’ naz [na42] ‘paddy field’ naj [na55] ‘face’ So, no letter indicates a rising ...


1

Judging by the word topolect, I think you are most interested in this: Phonetic realization of Mandarin tones in principal dialects (scroll down to the table with the caption 'Phonetic realization…'). This is how people from different regions will most likely realize the tones when they are speaking mandarin with the "local flavour", whereas educated people, ...


1

In Cantonese, "稀罕" carries a sense of "disdain". e.g. "我唔稀罕你尐錢!" (Your money means nothing to me) "邊個稀罕你尐錢呀?!" (Who cares about your wealth? / Your money means nothing to nobody! / Your money does not mean anything to anybody!)



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