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In modern Shanghaian and some other of Wu(Gnu) dialect, the adherence to the five tones has basically diminished in speech(still exists when referring to single characters), and converted into three pitches(low, mid, high). Pitches for the same character, however, do vary through speech. For example, notice how the pitch for character “大”'s one ...


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You could look at Tianjin, as close as 120 km from Beijing. The local Tianjin dialect is still exhibiting rather drastic changes to tones and tone changes. Drawing from your example, mandarin in Beijing and Tianjin differ in tones according to the following, with TJ accent being much more low-pitched: 1st tone = 55 (BJ), 21 (TJ) 2nd tone = 35 3rd tone = ...


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You might be interested to know that for some of the minority (non-sinitic) languages of China with tonal systems, tone letters are used rather than marks or numbers. Two examples are Zhuang and Hmong (Miao). Some examples: Northern Zhuang na [na24] ‘thick’ naz [na42] ‘paddy field’ naj [na55] ‘face’ So, no letter indicates a rising ...


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Judging by the word topolect, I think you are most interested in this: Phonetic realization of Mandarin tones in principal dialects (scroll down to the table with the caption 'Phonetic realization…'). This is how people from different regions will most likely realize the tones when they are speaking mandarin with the "local flavour", whereas educated people, ...



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