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ni3 shen2 me shi2 hou4 chi1 fan4 - eat food ni3 shen2 me shi2 hou4 hui2 jia1 - go home ni3 shen2 me shi2 hou4 "to do what" -> at "shen2 me shi2 hou4", "ni3" do what Generally, we use "shi2 hou4" in most time. xian4 zai4 shen2 me shi2 jian1 - What's the time? "shi2 jian1" is just used in the scenario when you want to know the exactly time. shi2 jian1 bu2 ...


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First, you can either use "ni3 shen2 me shi2 jian1 chi1" or "ni3 shen2 me shi2 hou4 chi1". Second, "时候" and "时间" are both used to represent some time instant, and "时候" is used more often than "时间" when referring some time instant. When you are referring to the quality of some time period, you would use "时间". For example, "ni3 chi1 duo2 chang2 shi2 jian1" ...


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Tuttle Learners 时间 a period of time 时间不够, 我没做完那道练习。 Shíjiān bú gòu, wǒ méi zuòwán nà dào liànxí. As there wasn't enough time, I did not finish that exercise. 我没有时间写信。 Wǒ méiyǒu shíjiān xiě xìn. I don't have time to write letters. 时候 [compound: 时 time + 候 a certain point in time] NOUN a certain point in time, ...


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A story tells of an ethnic minority student who simply wanted to borrow a pen from a female comrade. Ethnic minorites in China are often as tone deaf as Westerners, and when the guy wanted to borrow a pen (借你的笔 / jie4 ni3 de bi3), it became 借你的屄 (jie4 ni3 de bi1), and the female student got all red in her face pondering the proposal of lending her cunt to ...


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Note that I'm Taiwanese and I use Traditional Chinese characters. The swear words I type below (sorry!) may look different in Simplified Chinese. Also, China has way more swear words than us that I don't understand. ...for swear words, do they use the same character they use for the word or is it written differently? As many people have written above, ...


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日 is a swear word getting popular and popular in china these days.. By the hatred for the Japanese.. And it's stroke like the circle with a dot in the center.. Same meaning as sticking up your middle finger.. It is a very ”powerful” word that doesn't need any help of other words to lead it's meaning. Like "ri ni ma"for integrated phrase. The same applies ...


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A friend of mine used to go to the post office and borrow a pen (bi3) from one of the women who work there. However, she kept asking if the woman had a bi1 (in the first tone), which means a cu*t until a friend noticed what she was saying and told her what it meant. And they say shabi, which is pretty offensive, it would translate as stupid c*nt.


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干(gan4) is another character that could be accidentally said as a swear word in Chinese. 干(gan4) could mean do as in "gan4 shen2 me" or tree bark as in "shu4 gan4". However, 干(gan4) is also the equivalent for "f**k" in Chinese. In our experience, our students usually accidentally say it when slowly pronouncing the compounds such as "gan4 shen2 me" and ...


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I think maybe your friend is referring to "ma de", which literally means "your mother" but colloquially means "f**k". Actually, there's a slow, drawn out way to say this, which is "maaaa de", which means "f**k", "s**t"... but honestly, without the "de" (which sounds like "duh"), no one will misinterpret your meaning (or lack of meaning) by simply saying ...


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The difference between these two characters is similar to that of "listen" and "hear" in English. 看 emphasizes the action of looking, while 见 prefers the result of see.


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They don't both mean "to see" exactly. Actually, both have multiple meanings, some but not all of which overlaps. Possible meanings of 看: To observe To view (in appreciation) To visit To (visually) estimate To be treated by a doctor As a particle, it conveys the sense of "give it a try" Possible meanings of 見: To have seen To visit To meet (in the ...


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In Classical Chinese, 见 describes the action that you get visual information. It implies the result, but has no duration. 见 is more like to see, 看 is more like to look (at). In modern Chinese, you probably will not use 见 as a verb. Instead, you say 看见, which consists of a verb 看 and a particle 见. In Classical Chinese, we say 不见, but in modern Chinese, we ...


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This concerns a mid-back vowel pair of [ɤ]/[o] (in IPA symbol), where [ɤ] is unrounded and [o] rounded. In today's mandarin in China, it's unrounded; in taiwan, it is sometimes rounded and sometimes unrounded, depending on the preceding consonant. If the preceding consonant is labial then pinyin o is the rounded [o], otherwise the unrounded [ɤ]. The ...



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