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早已 is more formal. It is seldom used in modern Cn Lang. In general, it brings you negative emotion. (Something/Somebody has gone/disappeared/left) 早就 has some deeper meaning such as pride, regret, impatient, etc. It broadly used in modern Cn Lang. e.g. 我早就把早餐做好了 - I have cooked our breakfast already. [PRIDE] 他早就去世了 - He has been dead already. (I missed ...


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But why do I think they are all the same?Maybe "早已” is used more often in the past time and it sounds more literary.They are not so different now.


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早已 and 早就 are different. They can be exchangeable in practice and may or may not have the same meaning. But their grammar structure are different. Examples-1: 他搬走了.(He moved) (To answer what happened to him?) 他已经搬走了.(Since he moved, he is no longer here) 他早已经搬走了.(1) (Since he moved, he is no longer here. That happened long time ago.) 他早已搬走了.(same as 1) ...


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地点 is a place where something is or could be located. 现场 is the place where an action or event occurs.


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Just as in English, there are situation where the same meaning is present with different words. For example: 1 + 1 = 2 We said 1 plus 1 equals to 2, or we can say, while not as common, 1 add 1 equals to 2. Now take another example: Add more oil to the pan using plus on above sentence will be arguable. Now a third example: "Our family ...


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You drive to a gas station to "加油". We don't say "添油". If you add some firewood to a campfire, we usually say "添柴". If you say "加柴", if still makes good sense, but does not sound as natural as "添柴". Otherwise, the character "添" is usually used with other characters, like "增添". Although ""增添" and "增加" have the same meaning, they're not fully ...


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Strictly speaking to the questions, 我走了 is a pretty common sentence that everyone knows it's an about-to-happen action. Everyone knows it can be an about-to-happen action in the right context. Without any context, however, it still strikes me as a past action as in "讲座你听完了么?""没有,我走了". without any context, ... , is there a chance that a native ...


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了 in "我去中国了" does not emphasize it is a past or future action in absent of context. Consider the following: 我去年去中国了 - I went to China last year 我明年去中国了 - I will go to China next year Both are legit and 了 changes depend on the content, althought a native speaker will say: 我去年去了中国 - I have been to China last year 我明年(要)去中国了 - I have to go to China ...


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For a future action, there must be 要, 就要. It means "it is the time to do it", not exactly future action. For true future sense, say 将要. The key is more in 要 than in 了. 他去中国了 verses 他要去中国了. If you are the speaker, keep it for safety. Say, 他已经去中国了 versus 他就要去中国了.


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Today they are interchangeable as long as they mean "miserly". 小器 predates 小氣 In The Analects, Chapter 3 (論語 ‧ 八佾) (4th-3rd century BC) 子曰:管仲之器小哉。或曰:管仲儉乎 "Confucius says Guan Zhong is miserly, but someone asks if he is frugal?" Does it make sense that 小器 means miserly? Yes and no because "miserly" and "frugal" are not identical. But 小器 also means ...


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From Beijing's FLP C-E dictionary, 小气 and 小器 are considered identical. 小气 is described as stingy/miserly or narrow-minded, while 小器 is described as equivalent to 小气, without an explanation of its own. Using a smaller dictionary (Oxford Concise EC-CE), 小器 is not listed. To me this implies that 小器 is less common. I discussed this with two friends of mine who ...


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In my opinion, the former means more like "selfish", and the latter means "small household utensils", we Chinese use it to descrip someone who can't understand others with even a small thing. However, sometimes, "小气' can be "小器".


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I am a native Chinese speaker. Knowing exactly the meanings of the words "複" and "復" is a key to a solution of your problem. The word "複" has a meaning of "double". For example, "複數" means "complex number", because a complex number can be loosely viewed as a pair of real numbers. So "複習" means "study or learn again". The word "復" has a meaning of "re-". ...


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While 複 and 復 are pronounced exactly the same in modern Mandarin Chinese with the exact same tones (fù) and are both written as 复 in Simplified Chinese, they originally had different pronunciations. 複 was pronounced with an unvoiced initial consonant in Middle Chinese (ca. 600), /pjuk/, while 復 had a voiced initial consonant, /bjuk/. Because both words ...



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