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10

Yup. The typical phrase spoken when serving food is qǐng màn yòng (請慢用). It lliterally means "please eat slowly", but is better translated as "enjoy your meal", and serves the same function as the French bon appétit.


7

Sorry has many meanings in English while 对不起 doesn't do that in Chinese. Most of the case, you can use 不好意思 - it'd be more easy-going and it's a little like "sorry" in English sometimes. So for different context you need to say different words. Some examples for you: 不好意思 - It's very general and can fit many situations. I recommend use it when you're not ...


7

A few that are used the most in my surroundings: 好吧 (in a helpless tone) = Fine. 随便 = whatever. 都行 = whatever. 无所谓 = I don't care. 你说[X]就[X]吧 = If you say so.


6

Like Semaphore said 请慢用 is good for very formal circumstances. In less formal circumstances you can say something like 慢慢吃 - which basically has the same meaning. This can also be used among family and friends.


6

In all these situations I would use one of these 这样不好 这样不太好 这样好象不好 short, simple and broadly usable. adds a feeling of "not optimal". adds some level of uncertainty to the statement.


6

I can't recall any Chinese expressions used in the same way as calling out with 'Surprise!' in English. I guess the reason might be that Chinese Culture doesn't make Chinese people as playful as English Culture making its people. We say something different from 'surprise!' in similar cases: I bring a gift to a friend, before showing him/her the gift, I ...


6

The other answers covered the translation part. I am going to give my two cents on the culture side. Is there a set-phrase that is often used to express this idea? I don't think so, because traditionally Chinese don't really respond that way. If someone is 'predicting' your order, he's really saying 'I know what you like' as a gesture of intimacy, ...


5

听到这个消息我感到很遗憾 Tīng dào zhège xiāoxi wǒ gǎndào hěn yíhàn


5

No, but in the dialect spoken where I lived people say 没得屌事.


5

my preference: "很不起眼儿" can be translated into “unimpressive”,while "其貌不扬" into "unimpressive-looking". The reason is that "unimpressive" can refer to many aspects such as his appearance, his achievement, and etc. Compared with"很不起眼儿", ""其貌不扬"is more specific to the appearance, so "looking" is added to "unimpressive".


4

It will be easier to answer this question if a more specific scenario is given. Let me try to suggest one: A: 能不能再加一小时班? 明天绝对不会再让你加班了 (Could you work overtime again for an extra hour? I won't ask you tomorrow, I promise.) B: 好吧... 既然你已经这么说了, 那我还能说什么呢? (O--k--ay--, If you say so... :-| ) If you simply want to say "O--k--ay--" in Chinese, with ...


4

遗憾/惋惜/难过 all can be used in this context, but IMHO none of them is the Chinese counterpart of "sorry". Using the example in this reference, I am sorry to hear that your brother passed away. 听到你兄弟去世的消息,我很难过。 When it's in Chinese, it seems to imply the speaker knows the person who died and personally feels sad for it. People also say “我*为你*感到难过” ...


4

It all depends on the formality of the letter or email, the age of person being addressed, his/her relationship to you and how familiar you are with the said person. This is not something that you can define or quantify - you just have to get a feel for it. Anyway, for letters, the standard valediction goes something like this: 此致 敬礼! Note the double ...


4

I am not a linguist. So I can only give you my perspective as a native Chinese speaker. To make it short: 看不起 is rarely used on an object, whereas 看不上 can be used on both persons and objects. Some examples: 我最 看不起 他这种自私的人。 CORRECT 我最 看不上 他这种自私的人。 CORRECT 品味一向很高的她根本 看不上 这种便宜货。 CORRECT 品味一向很高的她根本 看不起 这种便宜货。 Understandable but AWKWARD


4

Since you are using the reference "dong gua tong" (冬瓜湯, white gourd soup), I assume the restaurant owner is a Cantonese speaker. The following are some commonly used responses to express your gratefulness from receiving a gift in Cantonese/Mandarin. The last two are not quite suitable in your case. They are generally used when you receive something which is ...


4

ABC: inconspicuous; not striking; unremarkable A Chinese-English Dictionary: DIALECT not attract attention; not be noticeable; not be attractive 这座厂房并不起眼, 但产品却是第一流的。 Zhè zuò chǎngfáng bìng bù qǐyǎn, dàn chǎnpǐn què shì dì-yī liú de. The factory building doesn't attract much attention, but the products are first-class. 别看这人不起眼儿, 人家可是一肚子学问。 Bié kàn zhè ...


4

To rate something, I would say: (要)在十分內打個分數,(我會給六分) On a scale of 1 to 10, (I would give it a 6.) 在十分內 = Under a score of 10, 要 is just optional. Other ways of saying are: 若要评分,我会给...(To give a score, I would give...) 如果要我给分数,我会给...(If I have to rate it, I would give...) It is not frequent in Chinese to say something like this, comparing to English. ...


3

There's no real special phrase for this situation, unlike English's "I beg your pardon". Therefore, anything conveying the sense of "please repeat" or "I didn't hear" works. For instance, as is increasingly the case in English as well, normally you could just say "what?", 什麼?. To be a little more preciser, as well as polite / less familiar, you could say ...


3

"Thinking outside the box" can be translated to 奇思妙想, which is a 成语 and also a noun. Your idea is great! That is really thinking outside the box. 你这主意太棒了!可真是奇思妙想。 "Think outside the box" can be translated to 打破常规,开动思想, or 打破常规思维, which both are common expressions, but not 成语. You need to think outside the box to sovle this problem. 要解决这个问题,你得打破常规,开动思想。 ...


3

I think 天马行空 is the one. 天马行空 tiānmǎ-xíngkōng [be powerful and unstrained like a heavenly steed soaring across the skies] 天神之马来往疾行于空中。比喻思想行为无拘无束。亦形容文笔超逸流畅 but use it carefully,天马行空 does not always commendatory The imagination of child has no limits like the god horse flying in the heaven , details all show the creative ideas ...


3

Essentially it's form of concession, either through a counterargument or the acquiesence of a mutually agreed upon opinion. There are different ways to express concession in Chinese. Here are some possible translations that I can think of based on your examples. This is far from exhaustive and some of them might be preferred over others depending on the ...


3

謹上 or 敬上 is fairly common. Your own name precede this closing term, contrary to English.


3

I also like 真不好 and even the colloquial 糟糕 for some of the examples you wrote.


3

Note that 啥子树子招啥虫 emphasizes more on similarity of couples of marriage. 龙生龙,凤生凤,老鼠儿子会打洞。 Dragon's son must be a dragon, phoenix's son must be a phoenix, and that of a mouse must can dig holes. Meaning: A great man teaches out great sons, a noble man cultivates noble sons. Normal people have only normal posterities. Sometimes we neglect the second half ...


3

I agree with you that the English classification you are using is not accurate because the strong negative inference is lost. 不起眼 represents the outer idea: but just taking 起眼 shows the highly negative implication of the main term: Therefore as you've noted, the English term is much softer than Chinese term used in this case. Regarding your side ...


3

What about: "Shoot!" "Shoot; it's raining." "Shoot; I forgot to bring my phone." "Shoot; I'm late." "Darn." "Darn, it's raining." "Darn! I forgot to bring my phone." "Darn; I'm late." "Oh no." "Oh no, it's raining." "Oh no. I forgot to bring my phone." "Oh no; I'm late." To emphasize that "astonishing strike," perhaps something like "Shoot, ...


3

I use it! =) My friends use it too. But we are immigrants who have lived in the USA for many years with fluency in both languages (we use both languages) so not sure if our English might have affected that. But, I remember hearing that phrase when I was little in China as well. We usually don't use the direct translation of "on a scale of 1 to 10", instead, ...


2

A direct translation would be:"我不在乎". If you want to make an emphasis or show your anger, you could say:"爱咋咋的". "爱咋咋的" is more commonly used in Northern area, which literally means "[do] anything you like to[, I don't care.]", you can also simply say "随便”.


2

Please advise the situation you are facing. Generally, when we want to express sympathy we will say "我很同情您" or "很同情您的遭遇". When we say "对不起", it always means we made a mistake.



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