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5

It's homophonic of 溜, which means proficient, smooth (in doing something) in Nothern dialects. Note it doesn't imply a top degree of mastery. It's more like nice instead of pwned. The use of number 6 first appeared in online games, then spread to internet contents. Some examples for the original word: 他爬树很溜(儿)。He's good at climbing trees. ...


5

Wang Li (王力) in his 漢語史稿 (p. 532) lists 對象 as one of the many words that modern Chinese borrowed from Japanese; in this case, acc. to Wang, 對象 taishō was itself a Japanese translation for English "object", a case of 來自西洋,路過日本. The use of 對象 to mean "steady romantic interest", "possible marital partner" probably came later, through the sort of ...


4

As Stan hinted at, 宝 is a Japanese Shinjitai character. It is also a simplified Chinese character, but that's coincidental. Perhaps this fact isn't so well known, but PRC aren't the only ones that performed simplification to Chinese characters - it is merely the most well known and widespread. Japan attempted their own simplification process, but theirs was ...


3

I wouldn't call 嗨 onomatopoeic, since it doesn't seem to be imitating any particular sound. According to the Ministry of Education's 國語辭典, 嗨 is an interjection that expresses discouragement, regret, surprise, etc. It is sometimes written as 咳, (in this sense also read hai, not ke). This use goes back to Yuan dynasty drama. It can also be used in ...


3

I assume you are talking about the origin and evolution of characters, as opposed to the origin and evolution of the words they represent. These two are complementary, but not identical. Analyzing characters and tracing their forms from the oracle bones through Zhou bronzes on into the forms used over 2000+ years of dynastic history is a huge job, and ...


3

焗 as used in Cantonese means "to bake" in the most general sense of the word. The method of baking you quoted in your question appears to describe specifically to how the Hakka/Cantonese dish 鹽焗雞 ("salt-baked chicken") is prepared, rather than the meaning of 焗 in general, which is simply a method of cooking by surrounding heat. For instance, the word for ...


2

I think the answers so far are from people who have never done construction work. I have. I take the same story from Baidu as cited by Drunken Master and kxxoling. The process of smoothing (磨) the bricks does not only take a lot of time. More importantly, it is easy for workers to relax and stretch out the time by simply not pushing very hard as they ...


2

As a Chinese with a graduate degree, I claim I have never seen that word before. But I can guess that it literally means a humorous imitation. There is no specific context I can give you. (谐) humor (仿) imitate


2

The story as far as I can tell is that 戲仿 is the original Chinese term for this sort of literary game. The practice was not that common, but it was not unheard of either. The mid-Qing novel 鏡花緣 has a whole chapter describing games involving complicated parodies (chapter 87: 因舊事游戲仿楚詞 即美景詼諧編月令). The games involved a lot of drinking, and I had a lot of ...


2

百度:谐仿是指对原作品的嘲弄, baidu: 谐仿 is at original work make fun of, parody is pretty good!


1

You are all experts on chinese culcure. But allow me to add some comment. Another Chineses expression regarding 吃我豆腐 is 占我便宜,which also means taking advantage of me. But in the contemporary era, girls use 吃我豆腐 to expecially describe some one touched her boobs. Because they bear great similarities in both appearance and feel.


1

I tried looking for sources trying to find where 嗨 was to represent an English word. This 2003 article from an apparently notable Chinese arts newspaper complains about TV hosts using 嗨 to mean the English word high, as in exhilarating: 近来,常常听到主持人用“嗨”这个字。。。令观众和听众只能朦胧地意会 (Recently, I've heard a lot of TV hosts use the word 嗨...it causes the listeners to ...



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