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11

慢走 is a polite thing to say usually used for someone who is leaving, has two implicit meaning: I don't want you to leave, so please leave slowly, so I can stay a little longer with you. Don't hurry, take care. 慢点儿 has the same meaning, but not as formal as 慢走, and sounds more affable.


6

Yes, it's still used and a common phrase, which is used to express that an event or object does not contain something new/creative (a bit more than just rehash a dead conversation). You can search using the keyword "炒冷饭 没有新意" to find the use of this phrase.


5

You heard it right and all above answers are correct. But I'll just translate 慢点儿阿 in this context (as a lot more cases) as "take care".


5

There is no exact equivalent of the English "oops" in Chinese. This is mostly because "oops" is a special English word, with an uncertain etymology but one theory is that it derives from "upsy-daisy". It is special because it is only used to express a mistake; I think you'll find that many other languages also don't have an exact equivalent of "oops". ...


4

Sichuanese does have an equivalent of oops. 哦呵(儿) 成都话方言词典 Sichuanese pinyin: o3 ho4 Pronunciation: [o⁵³ xo²¹³] 叹词。表惊异或惋惜 ▷~! 新盆子打烂了! interjection. diplays astonishment or regret ▷oops! (I) broke the new wash basin! I, personally, prefer the 儿化 pronunciation which would be something like: o4 her3 in mandarin pinyin. It can be written a ...


4

Homophones are often used humorously in Chinese. Some examples: Many jokes use the topic of people confusing similar-sounding phrases: 把一个卖糖葫芦的被揍了,到警察局,警察问理发师:“你为什么揍卖糖葫芦的?”理发师说:“我在屋里烫头发,他在外面喊‘烫糊喽’!” A man selling candy fruit (Tanghulu) was beaten up. At the police office, the police officer asked the haidresser: "Why did you beat up the candy ...


3

I think it's because of the Internet, which made this sentence popular. There was once a boy in Sina Weibo (China's version of Twitter) who sent a threat to a girl. The girl on Sina Weibo replied to express her dissatisfaction. The message was "吓死宝宝了". It soon got around on Weibo. Many people were talking about this. So now many people use this sentence to ...


3

你说它真它就真,说它假它就假, 它是真真假假假假真真谁也弄不明白. You claim it's true and as truth it is. You declare it's faulty as falsehood is should be. Is it true or false, go figure! One not so elegant translation would be if you say A, and I supposed to believe it as A and when you say about the same thing but this time it is B, and I supposed to believe it is B, so is it A ...


3

As stated in another answer, it should be 这个周末见 (which emphasizes that it is this weekend) or 周末见. 末见这个周 is incorrect, because it breaks up 周末: the characters comprise the word for "weekend" and must be together. So it must be that 周末 and any qualifers (here possibly 这个) must be before 见. I could imagine 你 being thrown in as an object, but it is ...


3

I've heard 慢走 plenty of times and 慢点儿 seems very similar. It’s just a polite thing to say that means something like 一路平安. They don't literally mean to walk slower.


2

If you mean someone is having an unsuccessful finish for the round, the word is 出局. You're out = 你出局了。


2

You were totally hearing it right. It is "慢点儿啊". Sometimes people may rush and get into trouble, so don't rush, take it slow and you will get back safely. I would assume you heard this in the northern part of China. It's not just shops, people would say the same to their guests when they leave. However, it's just a saying, being polite. Like in the UK, ...


2

Should be 这个周末见, or just 周末见, don't say 末见这个周. And yes, no need to throw in a 你.


2

thank you for inviting me for dinner 谢谢你邀请我与你共进晚餐 this saying is much more gentle than "谢谢你那天邀请我吃晚饭". Use the first sentence if you had dinner in senior restaurant and use the second sentence if you had dinner in your friend's home or it was just a common meal. thank you for the gift 谢谢你的礼物, and it could be much better if you say "谢谢你的礼物,我很喜欢"(thank you for ...


2

Yes. Nearly all Chinese people understand the body language of putting a finger on your lips or saying "shhh." In addition, Chinese also often use 嘘 pronounced xū instead of "shhh" to hush others.


2

哎呀(oh) 啊(oh) 哇(oh) 不(no) 我靠(shoot) 我肏(fuck) shit/fuck(Yes, they're used in colloquial Chinese because they can express the same idea as 我靠 and 我肏 but they're "politer".)


1

有女懷春、吉士誘之: A girl in love, enticing lucky men. 有女怀春 is actually a proverb. Embracing spring is thus a euphemism for being ready for love.


1

It means exchanging sth slinkingly. 狸猫换太子 is a famous legend story supposed happened in Song dynasty. 戲曲劇目。宋代故事戲。敘述宋真宗妃劉妃因妒李妃產子趙稹,以貍貓偷換太子,誣李妃產妖,使其貶入冷宮,劉妃得以冊立為后。後又火燒冷宮,李妃在逃出後流落民間。李妃原命人將趙稹投入河中,幸經太監搭救,送往八賢王府,長成繼帝位為宋仁宗。後包拯巧遇雙目失明的李妃,得知實情,乃大力審案,終使真相大白。劉妃被打入冷宮,迎李妃入宮,故事圓滿結束。 Here's an explanation of the story on wikipedia. Wild Cat Exchanged for Crown ...


1

The earliest reference i can make is a chapter "Nei Ze" in a book "Liji" (See http://ctext.org/liji/nei-ze). The word "sitting the month" has been replaced by "the month of confinement", "坐月子" by "月辰".


1

Not sure if this is directly translated from the English or not but: 撞死比撞伤强 And 宁撞死毋撞伤 Or 宁撞死 勿撞伤 I would go with the last one. There's this Sina article from '06 交通肇事潜规则:宁撞死毋撞伤? http://news.sina.com.cn/s/2006-12-24/123010849978s.shtml?from=wap Talking all about it. As for context, like the title of the article says above its really ...



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