Hot answers tagged

11

慢走 is a polite thing to say usually used for someone who is leaving, has two implicit meaning: I don't want you to leave, so please leave slowly, so I can stay a little longer with you. Don't hurry, take care. 慢点儿 has the same meaning, but not as formal as 慢走, and sounds more affable.


9

得 : got to / must / have to ABC must / need / should be 弄清楚 : ABC make clear; figure out 得 is read děi when it means must/have to/need to. I would translate 首先得弄清楚我们需要什么。 as: we first need to figure out what we need


8

了 here is read liǎo which means: to finish / to achieve / variant of 瞭|了 / to understand clearly -CC-CEDICT thus 不了 unable to / without end -CC-CEDICT 忘不了 = can't forget / unforgettable 喝不了 = can't drink / undrinkable


8

When asking a Chinese person "are you full" when eating a meal its like asking "are you enjoying your meal?" The host will be happy if he knows you are full. But when someone says 你吃飽了嗎? to you when not eating a meal. it means "Are you stupid?" or "Are you crazy?"


6

I think is a slang in Taiwan 乾掉了 mean something is turning into boring(usually use after someone say a not funny joke) or the situation that people don't know what to say or react to it ex1: You just meet someone new to you after greeting, you don't know what to say to him, and so does he this embarrassed situation can be said "乾掉了" ex2: you are ...


6

As you had said, 所 is not redundant. But to me, "有帮助" and "有所帮助" doesn't have that much differences, especially when you are in an oral conversation with Chinese people. As for your explanation for "有所謂", the translation for "这件案子有所谓" is "This case matters." You are correct. But I don't think that it has the meaning of "has something that it says". Yes, "謂 ...


5

You heard it right and all above answers are correct. But I'll just translate 慢点儿阿 in this context (as a lot more cases) as "take care".


5

乾 and 幹 are both the traditional Chinese characters and can translated to a same simplified Chinese character 干. 幹掉了 is a slang means to kill or get rid of it. 乾掉了 just means something is vaporised or dehydrate.


5

It has more of an 'are you satisfied?' feel.


5

There is no exact equivalent of the English "oops" in Chinese. This is mostly because "oops" is a special English word, with an uncertain etymology but one theory is that it derives from "upsy-daisy". It is special because it is only used to express a mistake; I think you'll find that many other languages also don't have an exact equivalent of "oops". ...


4

Both are correct!! 你好,北京 is more like a casual greeting, e.g. Hello World! :D 北京,你好 is more like a greeting with a touch of respect, because you address the name first. Examples are, 张老师,你好 (Teacher Zhang, hello).


4

Sichuanese does have an equivalent of oops. 哦呵(儿) 成都话方言词典 Sichuanese pinyin: o3 ho4 Pronunciation: [o⁵³ xo²¹³] 叹词。表惊异或惋惜 ▷~! 新盆子打烂了! interjection. diplays astonishment or regret ▷oops! (I) broke the new wash basin! I, personally, prefer the 儿化 pronunciation which would be something like: o4 her3 in mandarin pinyin. It can be written a ...


3

I've heard 慢走 plenty of times and 慢点儿 seems very similar. It’s just a polite thing to say that means something like 一路平安. They don't literally mean to walk slower.


3

As stated in another answer, it should be 这个周末见 (which emphasizes that it is this weekend) or 周末见. 末见这个周 is incorrect, because it breaks up 周末: the characters comprise the word for "weekend" and must be together. So it must be that 周末 and any qualifers (here possibly 这个) must be before 见. I could imagine 你 being thrown in as an object, but it is ...


3

I actually think these two sentences are slightly different. The first sentence has its emphasis on "住", for example, in the context "我不在上海上学,我在上海住。” The second sentence has its focus on the residing place. For example, the context is 他住在哪里?他住在上海。 According to the context, you decide which sentence to use.


3

the usage is classical and shows up at least as far back as mencius: 吾豈好辨哉?吾不得已也。Here the meaning is quite literally "I cannot (不) achieve/obtain (得) an end (已)" to my argumentativeness. In other words, i have no choice but to argue. You might compare it with the much more colloquial 不得不. By the way be careful about the whole multi-character words thing. ...


3

Either saying 加油 or 加油加油 in a faster speed is a way to express the encouragement to oneself or the others. Also 哈(hà), 耶(ye, Enligh word Yeah), 呵(hè) can express the excitement when you win the score. Actually, "chu" and "fa" are just sound and no specific Chinese characters for the meaning you want.


3

Just as in the prude American culture, it is a kind of abominable censorship of certain expletives, like 狗日的 (fucking), 他妈的 (fucking), 我肏 (fuck), 我靠 (fuck) etc.


3

你说它真它就真,说它假它就假, 它是真真假假假假真真谁也弄不明白. You claim it's true and as truth it is. You declare it's faulty as falsehood is should be. Is it true or false, go figure! One not so elegant translation would be if you say A, and I supposed to believe it as A and when you say about the same thing but this time it is B, and I supposed to believe it is B, so is it A ...


3

I think it's because of the Internet, which made this sentence popular. There was once a boy in Sina Weibo (China's version of Twitter) who sent a threat to a girl. The girl on Sina Weibo replied to express her dissatisfaction. The message was "吓死宝宝了". It soon got around on Weibo. Many people were talking about this. So now many people use this sentence to ...


2

It is nothing more than a sympathetic gesture. The more general 吃饭了没有? just means ”how ya doing?”, ”are you alright?”.


2

不见不错 is gobbledigook. 不见不散 means that you will in fact agree to meet someone, that you are really committed to it. See you later is 再见 or 回头见.


2

2 words. in this case, 得=have to, 弄=make example: 1.我们首先得吃饭.(we have to eat first) 2.我要把这个问题弄清楚.(I gonna make this problem clear) and the pronunciation is "dei nong" translation 1 is what I prefer, but 2 and 3 are also acceptable.


2

I don't think you should omit it. It's something like Big Consumption Team/Division in the research department. It denotes the Team "I" work in, whereas 消费类行业 denotes the target industries "I" work on/am in charge of. Thus, the sentence should be, I am in charge of 6 consumer industries of the Big Consumption Team in the research department of this ...


2

“不了” in this context is pronounced "bu4liao3" and means "to be unable to". 比如说: 吃不了 unable to eat 忘不了 unable to forget


2

Should be 这个周末见, or just 周末见, don't say 末见这个周. And yes, no need to throw in a 你.


2

You were totally hearing it right. It is "慢点儿啊". Sometimes people may rush and get into trouble, so don't rush, take it slow and you will get back safely. I would assume you heard this in the northern part of China. It's not just shops, people would say the same to their guests when they leave. However, it's just a saying, being polite. Like in the UK, ...


2

I found the answer myself but thought it might be helpful to others. Technically, 所 is not redundant; in this construct, it precedes a verb to refer to the object being acted upon by the verb. Nonetheless, in the example, 所 may be optional because each of 幫助 and 貢獻 can be a noun or a verb. Thus, the sentence has different literal translation with 所 ...


2

thank you for inviting me for dinner 谢谢你邀请我与你共进晚餐 this saying is much more gentle than "谢谢你那天邀请我吃晚饭". Use the first sentence if you had dinner in senior restaurant and use the second sentence if you had dinner in your friend's home or it was just a common meal. thank you for the gift 谢谢你的礼物, and it could be much better if you say "谢谢你的礼物,我很喜欢"(thank you ...


2

哎呀(oh) 啊(oh) 哇(oh) 不(no) 我靠(shoot) 我肏(fuck) shit/fuck(Yes, they're used in colloquial Chinese because they can express the same idea as 我靠 and 我肏 but they're "politer".)



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