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11

哩勒公蝦毀 This sentence refers to the pronunciation of "What did you say?" in Min-Nan 哩(ㄌㄧ): You 勒(ㄌㄟ): an auxiliary verb 公(ㄍㄨㄥ): say 蝦毀(ㄒㄧㄚ ㄏㄨㄟˇ): what 蛤?! This word equals to "Huh? Could you speak up?". Taiwanese use this word commonly on the Internet because it's the first word choice in Bopomofo input method of "ㄏㄚˊ"


9

角 came from 銀角, which was historically a currency that represented a fraction of the silver coin (銀元). 元 came from 圓, a description of the coin's circular shape. A theory for 角's use is that since the basic meaning of 角 is a horn; by extension it came to be used to describe "things that looks like horns". And from there, "corners" 角落, "angles" 角度, etc. ...


9

得 : got to / must / have to ABC must / need / should be 弄清楚 : ABC make clear; figure out 得 is read děi when it means must/have to/need to. I would translate 首先得弄清楚我们需要什么。 as: we first need to figure out what we need


9

Same as English just without the for. 谢谢 + what. "thank you for the gift" = 谢谢 + 礼物 - maybe you would say 你送给我的礼物 or just 你的礼物 "you for inviting me for dinner" = 谢谢 + 邀请 + 晚餐 - so altogether you would say 谢谢你那天邀请我吃晚饭 (which is for what already happened - seeing as you're writing a card, so obviously you're thanking for the dinner you've already eaten and ...


8

了 here is read liǎo which means: to finish / to achieve / variant of 瞭|了 / to understand clearly -CC-CEDICT thus 不了 unable to / without end -CC-CEDICT 忘不了 = can't forget / unforgettable 喝不了 = can't drink / undrinkable


7

This is a Taiwanese (Min-nan) utterance. pronunciation: “哩(li) 勒(le) 公(gong) 蝦毀(siann-hue)?” translation word by word: You are saying what-thing? There is a hot Disney movie song FROZEN - Let It Go. Recently, we have a Taiwanese version of it http://youtu.be/23F1iAq__P8 at time slot during 1:18~1:21 There is a similar sentence (only the ...


7

When asking a Chinese person "are you full" when eating a meal its like asking "are you enjoying your meal?" The host will be happy if he knows you are full. But when someone says 你吃飽了嗎? to you when not eating a meal. it means "Are you stupid?" or "Are you crazy?"


6

The meaning of "哩勒公蝦毀" (li lei gong xia hui) is "What are you talking about?". And "蛤?!" means "What?". In one orthography of Min Nan (aka Hokkien, Taiwanese, Amoy, etc.), the phrase "哩勒公蝦毀" could be written as "汝咧講啥貨" (ru lie jiang sha huo), which literally means "What things are you talking about?" Its Roman transcription would be "lí leh kóng siáⁿ-hòe" ...


6

I think is a slang in Taiwan 乾掉了 mean something is turning into boring(usually use after someone say a not funny joke) or the situation that people don't know what to say or react to it ex1: You just meet someone new to you after greeting, you don't know what to say to him, and so does he this embarrassed situation can be said "乾掉了" ex2: you are ...


6

As you had said, 所 is not redundant. But to me, "有帮助" and "有所帮助" doesn't have that much differences, especially when you are in an oral conversation with Chinese people. As for your explanation for "有所謂", the translation for "这件案子有所谓" is "This case matters." You are correct. But I don't think that it has the meaning of "has something that it says". Yes, "謂 ...


5

It has more of an 'are you satisfied?' feel.


5

Here are a few ice-breaker sentences: 最近怎么样?(Literally "recently how"? = How've you been recently?) 最近好吗?(Literally recently good?) 最近忙什么?(Literally recently busy what? = What have you been busy for?)


5

乾 and 幹 are both the traditional Chinese characters and can translated to a same simplified Chinese character 干. 幹掉了 is a slang means to kill or get rid of it. 乾掉了 just means something is vaporised or dehydrate.


4

In my experience, 帥哥 is more addressed to refer to young people. It's like "Hey young man" in English. No matter what, being young is a beauty. People call the young generation 帥哥 in memory of their own long passed golden youth years.


4

I don't know how good you are at Chinese, you can read this Chinese wikipedia page for more information: http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/角_(貨幣) "毛" is simplified from "毫", which means little amount. In Chinese we have a saying as "一分一毫", which means very little amount. In most part of China, "毛" and "角" are interchangeable.


4

The phrase means "What did you say?"


4

Normally I would express that in Chinese as "今天簡直是太好了"


3

对X而言: Oxford English his promise isn't worth a damn to me 他的承诺对我而言一文不值


3

Meaning: handsome guy. Frequency: females use this word, males seldom use it. 3 situations. A literally handsome guy; Greeting, commonly used in market; Humour, to exaggerate the ugliness of a guy.


3

Chinese will say “今天真不错!” or "今天真是太棒了!" Of course there are more idioms to express similar feelings. Just FYI, when totally means in total, you can translate totally as 一共. However, when totally means completely, definitely, wholly, which is different from in total obviously, you cannot translate it into 一共. You can use 绝对,真地是,etc. In another scenario, when ...


3

Just as in the prude American culture, it is a kind of abominable censorship of certain expletives, like 狗日的 (fucking), 他妈的 (fucking), 我肏 (fuck), 我靠 (fuck) etc.


3

"the weather" will be fine for people live in city


3

These are some idioms which may be an answer to the question: 眉清目秀 (mei qing mu xiu) This literally means: "(His/this Man's) eyebrows are clear and (His) eyes are beautiful." 玉树临风 (yu shu lin feng) This literally means: "(Men are/He is like a) grown jade tree which has faced the wind." 英姿挺拔 (ying zi ting ba) This literally means: "The handsome appearance ...


3

the usage is classical and shows up at least as far back as mencius: 吾豈好辨哉?吾不得已也。Here the meaning is quite literally "I cannot (不) achieve/obtain (得) an end (已)" to my argumentativeness. In other words, i have no choice but to argue. You might compare it with the much more colloquial 不得不. By the way be careful about the whole multi-character words thing. ...


3

I actually think these two sentences are slightly different. The first sentence has its emphasis on "住", for example, in the context "我不在上海上学,我在上海住。” The second sentence has its focus on the residing place. For example, the context is 他住在哪里?他住在上海。 According to the context, you decide which sentence to use.


3

Usually Chinese people say 我觉得 or 我感觉, meaning "I feel": 我觉得你的英语比我的中文好。 我觉得今晚一定会很棒。 我感觉他们会否决我的提议。 Or you can use the structurally similar 我有一种感觉. It sounds more lyrical, and is less commonly seen: 我有一种感觉,那就是今晚一定会很棒。 我有一种感觉,如果我你逃课的话,老师发现会很生气的。 -- "I got a bad feeling about this" is a different thing. If the thing has not happened, then it's usually ...


2

Formal Ones 帥氣 (shuai qi) 英俊 (ying jun) Informal Ones This varies between places where Chinese is spoken. Also, since each of these places has many smaller, individual dialects, these examples may not always apply to each Chinese-spoken area. In Taiwan you could say: 美型男 (mei xing nan) 潮男 (chao nan) In China you could say: 高富帅 (gao fu shuai) In ...


2

Words you could use to approach your friends in Chinese with are: 老爸 (lao ba) for a dad or 老妈 (lao ma) for a mom. 老兄 (lao xiong) and 老哥 (lao ge) for older male persons and 老姐 (lao jie) for an older female person. 老弟 (lao di) for a younger male person and 老妹 (lao mei) for a younger female person. In all of the mentioned examples, 老 (lao) doesn't mean old. ...


2

You can just say 哎呀,太贵了! to express the meaning.


2

The corresponding Chinese expression for You can tell ...by ... is 一看...就知道... so You can tell he means it by the look on his face 一看他的脸色就知道他是认真的 Although for a lyric you probably want something like 他的神情告诉我他是认真的 "You can tell the spaghetti is cooked when it sticks to a wall." 能粘在墙上的spaghetti才是煮过的spaghetti where "You can tell" or "you know" is ...



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