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1

所 does not mean something here. It is used in Classical Chinese to clarify that the sentence is passive. Then, it is used in Modern Chinese to look formal.


6

As you had said, 所 is not redundant. But to me, "有帮助" and "有所帮助" doesn't have that much differences, especially when you are in an oral conversation with Chinese people. As for your explanation for "有所謂", the translation for "这件案子有所谓" is "This case matters." You are correct. But I don't think that it has the meaning of "has something that it says". Yes, "謂 ...


2

I found the answer myself but thought it might be helpful to others. Technically, 所 is not redundant; in this construct, it precedes a verb to refer to the object being acted upon by the verb. Nonetheless, in the example, 所 may be optional because each of 幫助 and 貢獻 can be a noun or a verb. Thus, the sentence has different literal translation with 所 ...


3

I actually think these two sentences are slightly different. The first sentence has its emphasis on "住", for example, in the context "我不在上海上学,我在上海住。” The second sentence has its focus on the residing place. For example, the context is 他住在哪里?他住在上海。 According to the context, you decide which sentence to use.


3

the usage is classical and shows up at least as far back as mencius: 吾豈好辨哉?吾不得已也。Here the meaning is quite literally "I cannot (不) achieve/obtain (得) an end (已)" to my argumentativeness. In other words, i have no choice but to argue. You might compare it with the much more colloquial 不得不. By the way be careful about the whole multi-character words thing. ...


1

不得已 can be considered as a word, just like the single English word, so there is no rule to this. And here the pronunciation of 得 in this expression is "de ".


1

得 also means 可以 (allowed, permitted), such as 不得吸烟(no smoking) 不(bù): not 得(dé): allowed 已(yǐ): to stop so not allowed to stop [something] becomes [something] must happen becomes to have to


0

As othera have already pointed out, 了doesn't have explicit meaning. It's an exclamation 叹词 marking a statement. There are also exclamation words that mark excitement (啊 呀 呢 吧 啦) or question (吗 呢). Note some words can be used in a question or a statement depending o the tone you said it with… If you are not yet confused at this stage, here are two examples to ...


0

Means long time no see, the "le" doesn' make any sense, 是语气词 语气词是表示语气的虚词,常用在句尾或句中停顿处表示种种语气。常见的语气词有:的、了、么、呢、吧、啊。语气词:附着在词语、句子末了,表示语气。 EDIT: Translation. the "le" doesn't make any sense, it's a modal word. Modal words are auxiliary words showing tone, often used at the end of a sentence or in the middle at a pause to show all kinds of tone. Among common ...


0

Technically speaking, 好久不见 and 好久不见了 are both acceptable; 了 completes the implicit meaning of "no see" as "have not seen" but can be omitted. IMHO, the two are more or less interchangeable and it is merely a personal preference of which to use (I prefer the later as well). Nevertheless, from my experience, people usually use the former in relatively formal ...


2

2 words. in this case, 得=have to, 弄=make example: 1.我们首先得吃饭.(we have to eat first) 2.我要把这个问题弄清楚.(I gonna make this problem clear) and the pronunciation is "dei nong" translation 1 is what I prefer, but 2 and 3 are also acceptable.


2

I don't think you should omit it. It's something like Big Consumption Team/Division in the research department. It denotes the Team "I" work in, whereas 消费类行业 denotes the target industries "I" work on/am in charge of. Thus, the sentence should be, I am in charge of 6 consumer industries of the Big Consumption Team in the research department of this ...


2

“不了” in this context is pronounced "bu4liao3" and means "to be unable to". 比如说: 吃不了 unable to eat 忘不了 unable to forget


8

了 here is read liǎo which means: to finish / to achieve / variant of 瞭|了 / to understand clearly -CC-CEDICT thus 不了 unable to / without end -CC-CEDICT 忘不了 = can't forget / unforgettable 喝不了 = can't drink / undrinkable



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