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12

Q is Chinese slang for "chewy", similar to al dente in texture. You can see it in example phrases such as "Q感十足" (very chewy). You would expect foods such as tapioca pearls, gelatinous candies, pasta, or rice to be described as "Q". From my experience, this term is more popular in Taiwan and Hong Kong and less so in the mainland. I have not seen this term ...


11

In my opinion, 汤 is a more common to be seen. When it refers to "soup", the "soup" is thin. I mean, most ingredient is water, and you can find other things such as meat, vegetables,etc. inside the water. 羹 is a thick soup. Generally, we will add some 芡粉(qiàn fĕn)(most composition is the starch) to the soup(We call this action "勾芡(gōu qiàn)"). The starch ...


11

Wiki page of 牛排 gives a clue of its etymology, written by, 姚德懷, the current chairman of 香港中國語文學會 (The Chinese Language Society of Hong Kong Ltd.), a non-profit organization in Hong Kong. Here's a summary: According to 漢語大詞典, the word 牛排 has been cited in some novels in Qing Dynasty in the beginning of 20th century. Such as: ...


7

马铃薯 (commonly known as 土豆 in Northeastern China) is the general term for potato. (炸/马铃)薯条 is commonly understood as French fries (hot chips). By default, both 炸 and 马铃 are redundant. 土豆条 and 炸土豆条 are the less common terms for French fries. Other related terms: 薯片 - potato chips / potato crisps / packet chips 薯泥 - mashed potato 薯餅 - hash brown 烤马铃薯 - ...


5

醡醬麵 and 炸醬麵 炸醬麵 can work as it means "noodles with fried sauce" 醡醬麵 is "noodles with extracted sauce (e.g. extracting oil)" 炸 fried (火 fire radical + phonetic 乍 zhà) 醡 extract (酉 container + 窄 narrow; from 穴 hole and 乍) Archaic character for 榨 (tool for extraction process. 木 wood used to refer to tools in this case) 醬 sauce 麵 noodles Alternatively, ...


4

Q is Hokkien. The character is「食邱」and pronounced ㄎㄧㄨ (kiu, same as "Q"). The Chinese definition is 軟靭 ruǎn rèn (soft and tough) and means the texture of food being chewy. See the post "Q(k‘iu⊦)──軟靭" on the "taiwanlanguage" blog.


4

This happens when the food can be cooked with (little or much) or without spicy. People ask how should the food cook for you, 我爱辣 (a weird expression) answers this question indirectly -- I like spicy so please put a lot of it in the food. The direct answers could be: 不要 (bùyào) / 不要辣 (bùyào là) / 不放辣椒 (bù fàng làjiāo) "cook without spicy" 微辣 (wēi là) / 少放点 ...


4

From the description, it contains glass noodle (a.k.a. clear noodle, noodle made of bean or potato starch), in that case the glass noodle is the main and other food materials are just sides, though in the picture the side overwhelmed the main. It is called 东北大拉皮, 哈尔滨大拉皮 or 五彩拉皮. 大拉皮 literally means 'grand (dish of) glass noodles'. 五彩 means 'colorful' ...


3

When you don't know the measure word, the safest choice is 个. It is the most common measure word, is used for things that do not have specific measure words, and can sometimes be used even if another measure word is used: ...


3

When I first saw the question title, I thought you were looking for a way to express the statement 'I love spicy food', which is what 我爱辣 sounds like. Although grammatical, 我爱辣 doesn't sound very natural, probably because the pronunciation of 辣 is close to the tone particle 啦. A more natural expression is 我爱吃辣, in which 吃 (eat) nails la4 into the context of ...


3

I think it's just invented by that one restaurant (or some restaurant else before). It's something like paronomasia, and may be seen at some Chinese restaurant, but it's not a famous/typical dish in Chinese dishes. 親子丼 has nothing to do with the Paul Simon song. And 親子丼 is a famous/typical dish at Japan. BTW: "Mother and Child Reunion" can be translated ...


2

This is more of an expansion on NSX's comment from above, but hopefully it gives you something extra to learn. 我爱吃辣的 "I love to eat spicy food" 我喜欢吃辣的 "I like eating spicy food" if you don't want to emphasize the 'love' part, you just want to state matter of factly that you like eating spicy food You might get asked by new acquaintances 你可以吃辣的吗? or ...


2

There's no standard Chinese name for the chicken and egg dish! you must know something about the Chinese food and its naming rule (actually there's no strict naming rules, just some conventions) to figure out what's going on. The Chinese dish naming rule is that, to attract customers to order a certain dish, the restaurant owner will name the dish in an ...


1

According to this: www.joyofkosher.com/recipes/mother-and-child-reunion-chicken-and-corn-egg-drop-soup/ Mother and Child Reunion (Chicken and Corn Egg Drop Soup) then wikipedia: Egg drop soup (traditional: 蛋花湯; pinyin: dàn huā tāng; literally "egg flower soup") is a Chinese soup of wispy beaten eggs in boiled chicken broth. gives us: 鸡蛋花汤 ...


1

"醡" is not only tradtional spelling but also simplified spelling. So does "炸". "炸" can be used in both tradtional chinese and simplified chinese. "炸酱面", "炸醬麵", "醡酱面" and "醡醬麵" are all right. However, "炸" is used in mainland China, and "醡" is used in Taiwan usually. It seems like that "apartment" is used in the USA and "flat" is used in the Uk. So the view ...


1

Usually if you can’t say the item’s name, you can just say: “我(wǒ)要(yào)这(zhè)个(ɡe)” (I would like this one) or “我(wǒ)要(yào)那(nà)个(ɡe)” (I would like that one) For the counter word, if you really don’t know exactly the counter word for the item, you can use the most common counter word “个(ɡè)”.


1

In ancient classical texts, 汤 means hot water, while 羹 means meat with sauce(see here), and later thick meaty sauce and sticky soup. However, when time went by, they are now all used to describe soup. But because they have different etymology, 羹 is taken as a thicker form of 汤. 汤 is a dish whose nuclear process is to boil a crock of water and consumed in ...



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