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8

When talking with friends I generally end with one of the following. 好,就这样吧 = That's it (kind of, hard to translate) 好,我走了啊 = I'm off now 好,下次再聊 = Talk again soon Or of course, the very simple 好,拜拜! Looking at that, I guess I like to say 好 a lot! Hope that helps.


7

The traditional Chinese letter is very complex.It has many honorifics that vary greatly for different receivers. But today,most people's traditional education is insufficient to write these letter. For email,people tend to write simply and practicably。 Habitual formation。 example: 周老师: 您好! ...


6

Alter words: 谢谢:多谢,感谢,谢恩(古代臣子百姓对君王说的) 对不起:抱歉,有愧,歉仄 As your case, 對不起現在才回覆您。 謝謝你的幫助! rephrase: (非常)抱歉现在才回复您。 (十分)感谢您的帮助!


6

IMO, 最近如何 is a little formal, while 最近怎么样 is much natural and genial. Anyway, I think it's OK for a formal social occasion. BTW: When 如何 is used in the context for how to do sth such as 如何刻录dvd, it's normal.


5

If you are looking for an exact English translation, the answer is that there isn't one. It is a tradition in Chinese culture. When you are talking about/to other people, you should butter him/her up by exaggerating his/her achievements, wealth, position and etc. And do the opposite thing when talking about yourself. It's all about being polite (when ...


5

Betty's answer is great. Here's some complement: Since almost every Chinese can understand these words, we use them in spoken lang occasionally, usually expressing some kind of mood or feelings. For example, if someone adopts an arrogant and impolite attitude to you, you can use one of the honorifics to express a scatching satire to strike back. And ...


4

They are not used in spoken language any more. They are quite common in novels, films and TV shows about ancient times. Most people can understand them without difficulty. Novels, films and TV shows about ancient times are very popular in China.


4

I will give you a example, explanation in the brackets, see if it's useful to you. this is a email I sent to my client, I think this format is kind of formal 孔经理:(he's a manager, and his family name is Kong, it's impolite to call somebody's name in a formal letter) blablabla 此致(this word means "I finish my word here" or "this is the end of this ...


4

尔 in traditional chinese is written in 爾. Although it also mean "you", I believe it's a typo. Because 尔 is widely used in old chinese. The situation is just like "Thou" and "you". It's rarely use in nowadays daily life no matter in HK, mainland China nor Taiwan. Instead of simplified Chinese, Hong Kong people usually write in traditional chinese. ...


3

您高就 = (请问)您(在哪里)高就? Direct translation is: May I ask where you work? The question is in a very formal and polite way.


3

In my considered opinion: Directly, 您- you (second person pronoun, formal) 高- high (adj.) 就- achievement. However 就 here comes from 成就 which means achievement. The interrogative turn would thus mean "Where are you achieving (i.e. working and attaining (hopefully!) praise and achievement)". As for the non-interrogative turn I would consider it just a ...


3

"最近如何" is used by educated people, you will hear which in formal occasions. But if you are in entertaining places or simply walking along a street, then yes, "最近怎樣" will be more frequently heard. This distinction may resemble the distinction between "How do you do" and "How's it going". Modern young kids seldom use "how do you do" to replace "how's it ...


3

On the mainland, this is usually a somewhat drawn out process, usually ending with a sequence something along these lines: `好了...好了。。。那,就这样吧。。。挂了。。。啊` `嗯,嗯,知道了。。。好了,好了, 好啊,。。。挂了` 挂了 (I'm hanging up now!), sounds kind of abrupt and rude, but it's used all the time and it doesn't sound rude at all. I'd would usually preface it with `那就这样` or the like.


3

usually, a Chinese won't use 您 to his parents. it's used only for a non-closed friend, a business member for example. Using an appellation with 你 instead. for example: 妈妈,你坐。 is better than 妈妈,您坐。 except that women is not your mother but your wife's. BTW, 您 don't have a plural form, turns to 你们 instead.


3

As you mention this is complex and subtle and likely depends on upbringing and which area you come from. I have heard my wife use 您 when talking to her mother, but not this is not a regular thing. From the conversations I remember, this is usually at times when my wife wants to discuss something difficult with her mother or when she is asking her to look ...


3

If you are receiving the call, you could say 感谢你的来电 = Thanks for calling If you are calling someone, you could say 感谢你的时间 = Thanks for your time You could also say 我们再联系 = We will contact again before saying goodbye and hangup.


3

if it's a close friend, then “那就先这样?改天我们再聊?" (how about we leave it off like this? we'll chat later?) if it's somebody you want to be polite/safe with, then "您看您还有什么事儿?" (is there anything more i can do/answer for you?) if it's a telemarketer and you are in a good mood, then "我现在没空.对不起挂了啊." (i'm busy sorry i have to hang up) if it's a telemarketer and you ...


2

For males or females who are older than yourself are not blood relatives e.g. not 表哥 or 表姐 and are usually unmarried and not quite old enough to be referred to as 阿姨 or 叔叔 then this is someone you might refer to as 大姐 or 大哥. This is normally out of respect to someone who maybe treats you as a younger brother or sister. In certain movies 大哥 is used for a ...


2

You should use 您 in 謝謝你的幫助!, not 你 That will be more polite


2

I am Chinese. If you asked me “最近如何”? I wouldn't feel it's formal at all. There could be difference between these two in other contexts, but definitely not here. Say if you want to write something in letter and want it to be formal. Try “最近可好”?


2

掸一掸 Dan3 Yi1 Dan3 A special tool for it is 鸡毛掸子 Ji1 Mao2 Dan3 Zi


2

氆氇(pǔlu 〖藏pulu〗)是藏族人民手工生产的一种毛织品,可以做衣服、床毯等,举行仪礼时也作为礼物赠人。 I don't think native speakers would say this word. "get them of" simply means 弄掉它们.


1

At first glance, I thought that it's just 高就 which means "promote in work". But according to your explanation, I wonder if it's a polite question asking "Where do you work?" Grammatically, 高 means "high(ly)" and 就 means "occupy oneself" or "occupy (a position)". P.S. Some examples from the first few pages at Google: 我小心问道:“施叔叔,请问您高就?” I asked him ...


1

Have you found a better job? 另有高就 is an idiom, and 高就 is a set verb phrase. 就 itself is an extremely versatile construction, here meaning accomplish or perhaps move toward (a higher position).


1

尔 is only used in ancient chinese written language, now we don't say 尔, it only exists in phrase.


1

尔 is only used in old Chinese. It is surprising to see someone who uses this word nowadays... For your future reference, there are several words which mean 'you' in old Chinese: 尔: implies that the person you speak to is inferior to you. So your boss could use 尔 when talking with you (but not vice versa!) I think your penfriend is actually addressing you ...


1

尔 for 你 It's rude to call someone 尔 ancient times.I only see people calling enemy with that.There is another word also means 你 in ancient:汝, doesn't offensive。 Because these words are used by ancients,some times it will be fun to use with familiar friends。 e.g. 伊 for 她 吾/余/予 for 我 私(meaning of Japanese kanji) for 我


1

I think the above answers are right. If you want to be VERY FORMAL in a written letter, you can use ancient expressions. Taiwanese still use them nowadays in formal letters. Ancient ways to express gratitude in written letter: ...


1

I second what Stan said; I've never heard anyone call their parents by 您. Usually, if it is a friend, co worker, family member, 你 is usually fine 您 is a respectful/formal way to address elders, guests, people of distinction (addressing a professor). Keep in mind, in both formal and informal situations, I hardly have heard people speak 您好。 I usually see ...



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