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8

Well, not sure if this answers your question or not, but I've played a game before involving using idioms (aka 成语) where you have to carry on using the same sound (not including tone) from whatever 成语 the previous person said. For example, if I started with 骑虎难下 (qi hu nan xia - something like stuck between a rock and a hard place) the next person might say ...


6

Yes, there is a game like "Crossword". I played such a game in this site. The site is a little famous since it provide this game for the famous newspaper Southern Weekend. Here is a screenshot:


4

There is a game very similar to Shiritori in Japanese. It's called "文字接龙" And for more advanced Chinese speakers, all the words need to be idioms. It's called "成语接龙".


4

Above answers provide a few Chinese word games, but I think most of them are a little too hard for beginners. Here I suggest an easier word game I played with my wife. At the beginning of the game, you thought (usually) two letters, for example "SC". Then all players must say Chinese words whose “声母” meets SC. Player A: 市场 Shi Chang -> SC Player B: 生存 ...


3

Of course there are many Chinese word games. They just have different style than the English ones since the two languages have different writing systems. Many Chinese word games are about radicals forming a character, not letters (characters) forming a word. I did a quick search and found an example: http://www.5dhz.com/game/chengyu/ There are many other ...


3

1) 杀人游戏 Well, I used to play a game called 杀人游戏 that involved nothing but listening and talking. It's not exactly a board game (you use one or more decks of cards), but as far as language practice goes, it's extremely useful. In the basic game you have a judge, killers, policemen and bystanders, and it's the policemen's job to work out who the killers are. ...


3

Dixit is a great choice for practicing Chinese. In this game, one person describes a card (without show it), and then everyone including him/her take out one card. At last, everyone else guess which card is his/her. If everyone or no one get the right answer, he/she get no score. So, he/she should describe it in a suitable way in order to make someone right ...


2

I think Password might be a good choice. One player is given a secret word, and has to get his teammates to say that word by giving them clues. He can't say the secret word as part of his clues. The trickiest part would be getting the words. You can either have everyone write a few words on slips of paper and stick them in a bag, or maybe use a deck of ...


2

At least on the Chinese Wikipedia article about Warhammer 4000, 桌上战棋游戏 is used.


2

One game I suggest you check out is Enter Zon - an MMORPG specifically for learning Mandarin. Essentially you run around in a game environment and have all sorts of dialogues about different things, with the end goal of improving your Mandarin. It's pretty neat.


1

Other than 成语接龙,I've played another word game of 成语. First,given a special topic, e.g. 数字(number)、生肖(Chinese Zodiac) etc, then name one 成语 related to the topic alternately. If you cannot think of a new one in your turn, you lose. E.g. the topic is 生肖, I start with 鼠目寸光, then you say 对牛弹琴, then a third person would go with 如虎添翼, and so on. If one couldn't ...


1

In recent months there has been a CCTV game show called 中国成语大会, where contestants play a game which could be called "chengyu charades": contestants form pairs where one must provide spoken hints without saying any character in the chengyu, and the second must guess the chengyu. This show had a precursor: 中国汉字听写大会 or Chinese Characters Dictation Competition, ...


1

As far as I know, there isn't any great computer game just for reading and listening practice, especially in Chinese. I recommend that you can just play some famous and traditional computer games in China, such as THE CHINESE LOVE STORY(Chinese name is: 仙剑奇侠传). Many young Chinese people grown up with this game.



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