Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

24

The usage of “的” is in possessive or adjectival context. E.g., (posessive) “我的狗”, or (adjectival) “真正的生意人”. Generally a noun is modified, so a noun follows it, unless it doesn't, such as “有点儿不足是难免的”, (some insufficiency is unavoidable) which is still an adjectival modifier (unavoidable), even though it modifies the noun (insufficiency) in front of it. “地” ...


16

Yes, that is fine; it is quite common to use 叫醒 with alarms. In fact you can use both 吵醒 and 叫醒 here, although there's a small difference in connotations. It isn't a very strong distinction though, so you needn't be overly concerned. Anyway, 叫醒 normally means the action was intended to wake you. In contrast 吵醒 carries the sense that being woken up is ...


15

Very good question. 还是 is usually used in asking questions. For example: 你想去北京还是上海呢? = Did you want to go to Beijing or Shanghai? 这是橙子还是橘子? = Is this orange or mandarin? 或者 is usually used in declarative sentence. For example: 我想去北京或者上海. = I wanted to go to Beijing or Shanghai. 你可以叫我小王或者老王. = You can call me Xiao Wang or Lao Wang.


14

Usually 了 is used to indicate past tense (or the completion of). Such as: 我吃了 了 is added to the end of the sentence that change the statement to past tense. You can add 过 before 了 to add emphasis. E.g., 我吃了 (I ate) vs. 我吃过了 (I have (already) eaten.) but 了 may be used for different reasons, some of which have nothing to do with past tense. ...


13

The first expression is usually used when the speaker has a feeling that the other person had done something, so he's making a guess, while the second could be either a simple question or suggestion. In the first case, 你是不是吃蛋糕了? can be used when the speaker noticed a cream stain on the other person's shirt or something like that. The speaker is ...


13

Basically they have the same meanings. Now let's focus on the difference, but first wrap your head in duct tapes in case it explodes. 往往 is usually used with conditions supplied. Without any condition it is usually wrong: 我常常加班。 -- Good. 我往往加班。 -- Wrong. 北京常常下雪。-- Good. 北京往往下雪。 -- Wrong. 北京往往在冬天下雪。-- Good. Notice the constraint. ...


12

Here's a trick my Chinese teacher told me (and it rhymes!): 动前“土”,名前“白”,动形中间“双人”来。 Use 地 (土字旁) before verbs, 的 (白字旁) after nouns, and 得 (双人旁) between a verb and an adverb. Example: 可爱的小妹妹正在快乐地拍皮球,笑得像花儿一样。 You can practice here. Advanced 的得地 speakers are very welcome to take this challenge. Hope this helps!


12

Yes. 中 can be used to express that something happened of didn't happen within a certain scope or range or just within something (《现代汉语词典》: 范围内;内部). The range doesn't need to be a time range, but it can be. Furthermore, it can also refer to the future. So you can say: 他预言战争将在下几年中爆发: He predicted that war would break out in the next few years. 年中 在最近若干年中: In ...


12

There are a few differences between those three words: "以及" can only connect phrases,not words. The phrases after "以及" is commonly considered to secondary. "与" and "和" are used to express the relationship. "与" is more elegant than "和". such as "老人与海". "和" is mostly used in oral form. In some cases,"和" and "与" are somewhat interchangeable, such as ...


12

该 is the formal equivalent of the word aforementioned or said: 该公司 - the said company 该法案 - the aforementioned legislation It is usually found in text to refer back to something that was mentioned previously. Informally, you can also use 那. Here is the meaning from 汉典: 那,著重指出前面說過的人或事物:~地。~書。


11

It's 50 000 or 50,000, the same as international standard. Reference: 出版物上数字用法的规定 (General rules for writing numerals in publications) 8 多位整数与小数: 8 Multidigit integers and decimals: 8.1 阿拉伯数字书写的多位整数和小数的分节 8.1 Segmentations for multidigit integers and decimals written in Arabic numerals 8.1.1 ...


11

This is a good question. 字了一 should be understood as: (and his) 字 (is) 了一 Thousands years ago, many people in China have a special name besides their first name and last name though nowadays most of Chinese don't have one. And this special name is often described after '字'. For example: 刘备,字玄德. According to some reference in Chinese, 字 sometimes can ...


10

"的" in this case means "certainly", "really", "I am sure that..." as the conclusion says in your question. For me, such sentences are the same. 我会去看他的。 我一定会去看他。 You can say "我一定会去看他的". The mood sounds stronger (I think it's not much stronger), but I can't tell you how strong it is (this is a natural language, not math). I would use this when I want ...


10

可以 means I can do it, but may I? For example : 我 可以 开车吗? May I drive? (Have the implication of I want to drive) 我 可以 开车。 I can drive (have the implication of I can, but I don't want to (unwilling to do so)) 会 means I am able to, or I know how to do it For example : 你 会 开车吗? Can you drive? (Are you able to drive? Do you know how to ...


10

There's no negative connotation, at all. 条 and 只 are used interchangeably in today's Chinese, not just specific to a region. Long ago, 头(頭)were used as a quantifier for dogs or other farm animals. I suspect "head" was dropped because dogs do not have stocky builds as other animals(pigs, donkeys, bulls etc). Also "头" tends to associate "dumb animals" and ...


10

I am pretty sure that you have the second to last character wrong. It makes much more sense as 件 (item). Also, 折 should be read as zhé in this context. The character has a large number of meanings, but in this context it means discount (and the single digit numbers preceding it count by 10%; this is a common idiomatic construction for expressing ...


10

一定 either introduces an INFERENCE, which is very likely to be true (as in the context of the given sentence), or shows a strong intention (in other contexts). On the other hand, 当然, equivalent to the English 'of course', indicates an inevitable consequence that the speaker KNOWS to be true. In this sentence, since the speaker is talking about himself, he ...


10

The first sentence means All of us are not students and the second one Not all of us are students (thus some of us may have occupations other than students). 都不是 (all not) is full negation and 不都是 (not all) is partial negation.


9

被 + verb = passive form 根除 = eradicate 被根除 = be eradicated Some verbs have active form with passive meaning. 根除 is one of them. So it's fine to remove 被 from this sentence. (These verbs are very similar to ergative verbs in English but mainstream Chinese grammar doesn't interpret them as ergative verbs.)


9

In my opinion, they mean the same:"if". "要是" is a little informal and more common in oral speaking, while "如果" is formal, I think, but you will see both of them in books. I could only catch up with one differences in use between them. For "要是“, because there is a "是" inside, when the verb in the "if-clause" is "是(to be)", "是" can be ommitted, however, "是" ...


9

I've been taught, however, that in Chinese, every noun has one and only one correct measure word associated to it, and in particular, you can't make the analogous distinction between the two cases in Chinese. This is completely wrong. Measure words in Chinese do carry meaning, just like in English. Using the wine example, all the following are ...


9

In the example sentence you give, 得 is just part of the word 记得 (= to remember). 你还记得我吗? Do you still remember me?


9

I think it is a terribly bad idea learning Mandarin by trying to map grammar from Western languages onto it. There is no such thing as countable nouns in Chinese, precisely because nouns do not have plurals. Conversely, you can make any noun ”countable” by adding a classifier to it: 你要一杯咖啡吗?


9

This pattern, like you mentioned, seems to be referred to as "A里AB"式 in Chinese. A quick search came up with the following list of words: 糊里糊涂hū lǐ hū tú 怪里怪气guài lǐ guài qì 流里流气liú lǐ liú qì 傻里傻气shǎ lǐ shǎ qì 土里土气tǔ lǐ tǔ qì 慌里慌张huāng lǐ huāng zhāng 妖里妖气yāo lǐ yāo qì 彻里彻外chè lǐ chè wài 胡里胡涂hú lǐ hú tú 没里没外méi lǐ méi wài 秀里秀气xiù lǐ xiù qì 歇里歇松xiē lǐ xiē ...


8

"I'll be back in 5 minutes" is the only correct translation for this sentence. "I came back 5 minutes ago" is 我5分钟前就回来了。


8

I'm not sure if you are familiar with 的时候 but this translates approximately to 'while'. So the sentence reads: While I was eating I read a book. You can see the English use "I" twice, so it may make more sense to you if you read it like this: 我吃饭的时候(我)看了一本书


8

So who came up with those common name translations at first place? Those common name translations are known as 音译 or transcription. In Chinese, transcription is known as yīnyì (simplified Chinese: 音译; traditional Chinese: 音譯) or yìmíng (simplified Chinese: 译名; traditional Chinese: 譯名). While it is common to see foreign names left in their original forms ...


8

所...的 and ...的 are different. Function of ...的 As you have already known, ...的 can construct adjective clause. (我喜欢)+的+东西 (subject + verb) + 的 + noun = noun + which + subject + verb And in Chinese, the noun can be omitted in a clear context. In this case, ……的 constructs a noun clause. 我喜欢的(人)是你。 Who I like is you. (subject + verb) + 的 ...


8

Overall both translations are fine and fluent, with some small issues below: Grammatical/Syntactic issues: I think there is only one issue, in (2) 我们想酒保因为要省钱的. Either use 要省钱 as verb (i.e. remove 的), or use 要省钱的 as adjective (i.e. add 是 before 要). Semantic issues: In (1), margarita mix is translated into 玛格丽特混合物. In Chinese, people don't refer food/drink ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible