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13

I'd like to offer a slightly different perspective from the other answers, and suggest that the most important difference between the two is that 太陽 is a free word, whereas 日 is a bound morpheme, i.e. it cannot appear as an independent word. Think of 太陽 as 'sun' and '日' as sol-. Of course they are not word for word identical with the English forms, but the ...


7

是 in the first context is only used to say: Noun1 是 Noun2 You never say 我是很好, because 好 isn't a noun. You can say 我是美国人 他是男孩子 我是李红 because all those relate one noun to another. In the case of 我25岁了, 25 years old isn't a noun, it's a state, and so we don't use 是. For a simple summary, 是 only relates 2 nouns to each other. If it's not a ...


7

Note: this answer may well be slightly incomplete. Usage of to that can be translated to 去 is the case only in specific settings. For instance, in English, I like to read books is grammatically correct. However, the Chinese equivalent would be 我喜欢看书: there is no addition of something like 去 before the verb (i.e. 看). Thus, at the very least, there is no ...


6

日 both means sun and day (and is short for Japan, etc.), but the most common meaning of 日 is day or daytime. E. g. : 每日 every day, daily 日志 journal, log 昨日 yesterday 日报 daily (paper) and many-many more. The only examples I can think of where 日 denotes the Sun and not day/daily are: 日出 (rì chū) sunrise 旭日 (xùrì) rising sun 烈日 (lièrì) scorching sun 红日 ...


6

I think ice cream is probably not the best example to demonstrate this, since it comes in many forms and some are counted as one ice cream (e.g. those that are attached to a stick), others as some ice cream (those that come in a huge platic box and you need to create portions and serve them to your family members). So I'll use a different example, something ...


5

There is a lot that could be said here, but the basic problem is that Chinese just doesn't have articles, either definite or indefinite. Chinese is not the only language like this. Japanese and Latin don't have articles either. Here is the difference between English and Chinese in its simplest form: He is student. Not possible. He is a student. ...


3

看在 ABC 2 be for the sake of ... 看在你爸的面子上, 我原谅你。 Kànzài nǐ bà de miànzi shàng, wǒ yuánliàng nǐ. For the sake of your father's face, I forgive you. 份上 Guifan 2 名 情分; 情面 看在老人的份上, 我不再跟他计较。 (口语中也说份儿上。) Which basically translates to feelings, sensibilities, affections. for the sake of, for sb.'s/sth.'s sake ABC ENGLISH ...


3

Drunken (programming) Master is right. These 2 from iciba: It sounds like a wonderful idea to me, does it really work? 听起来这个主意很不错,真的能行吗? His rhetoric sounds like the death rattle of a fading leadership. 他的慷慨陈词听起来像是一个衰落的领导层垂死的挣扎。 They also have examples of 听上去。It's a great site for finding example sentences.


3

The word used in modern Chinese is nearly always 太阳. In nearly all cases where in English you would use the word sun you can use 太阳. The only exception I can think of is 向日葵, which means sunflower. There may be some other compounds words or derivative words (solar) that use 日 instead of 太阳, but I think generally, it would be would be pretty safe to use 太阳. ...


3

就 here means ”just”. When you want to go, just go. 就 is very versatile, and has many uses. but this is the basic meaning. 的 is not related to 就 here, but to 时候. 的时候 means ”when”, ”the time when”, ”the time of (something)”.


2

The other answers have mostly covered the issue , but I wanted to give my take on it, particularly since I stated I would in the comments and since one of my ideas hasn't quite been covered. Firstly, it's important to note that there isn't much of a direct, one-to-one correspondence between articles in English and "articles" in Chinese. There are a number ...


2

的时候 is an interesting way to construct time markers in Chinese, it means "when (something happens...)". In your example, the whole 6 characters in 你想走的时候 are part of the ...的时候 construct, which matches your first translation, i.e. Whenever you wish to go, just go. or Anytime you want to go, just go. Well, the best resource to train your "parser" is just ...


2

You can try this to challenge your tongue. 四是四,十是十;十四是十四,四十是四十 Good luck with your tongue!


1

... the "How" of the main verb in the sentence should always come before the verb itself. This is correct if "how" is referring to the adverbs. In Chinese, adverbs are placed before verbs, unlike in English they can be either before or after. It's eyes were red, like a pair of rubies." (它的眼睛红红的,像一对红宝石) The thing with this sentence that makes it ...


1

In Chinese, "His eyes were red, like a pair of rubies", His maybe 他的 or 它的. From the native speakers' view, I think the word order is His eyes were red and like a pair of rubies.


1

I would parse this as 看, look, 在, at, preposition (or result complement), 孩子, kids, 的, possessive particles, 分, separation, 上, a postposition forming a "prepositional sandwich" with 在. So literally, I would translate it to "Looking on the side of the children", which I would then render more loosely as "for the children's sake". So neither of those should be ...


1

As a Chinese, I feel 日 is usually used in ancient Chinese or modern Chinese vocabularies from the old days, we use 日 in modern Chinese is because in some cases, we want to simplify the word, like 日光浴,basically means tanning, 日光 means sunshine, and 阳光 means sunshine too. So, if you say 太阳 in modern Chinese, in most cases, you're exactly fine. however, if ...


1

I suspect this may be an example of "Taiwan style Mandarin" 台灣國語. In the Minnan dialect, 嘛是 = 也是 (教育部臺灣閩南語常用詞辭典); this is also used in an emphatic form 攏嘛是 to mean "without exception", where 攏 = all (都). Put into Mandarin, it's equivalent to phrases like 都是這樣, or 專門做這種事 Rather than use 攏 long to write this Minnan expression however, some people write ...



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