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6

This is a good question. 字了一 should be understood as: (and his) 字 (is) 了一 Thousands years ago, many people in China have a special name besides their first name and last name though nowadays most of Chinese don't have one. And this special name is often described after '字'. For example: 刘备,字玄德. According to some reference in Chinese, 字 sometimes can ...


5

男兒 is MAN 當 is 應當, which means SHOULD,MUST 自 means 自己, SELF 強 is a verb short for 圖強,here 圖 means FIND WAYS TO DO STH,and 強 means TO BE STRONG. So 男兒當自強 means A man should find ways to make himself strong


4

字了一 means 表字:了一。 表字: Chinese style name; courtesy name (a name traditionally given to Chinese males at the age of 20 (also called 字)) check http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%E8%A1%A8%E5%AD%97 http://zh.wikipedia.org/zh-mo/%E8%A1%A8%E5%AD%97


3

信得过 literally refers to "Trust-worthy ", where 信 = trust, 得过 is an adjective means "able to / worthy" You can say "他很可信" (He can be trusted) which means the same as "他很信得过" (He is trustworthy) For the form 信得过, we also say "買得过" (worth buying) and even "嫁得过" (worth marrying).


3

信得过 means 'can be trusted/believed/depended upon'. I would actually classify it as a verbal phrase as there are usually more formal ways to express it in writing, such as 可靠 (dependable) or 可信 (believable). I would say “他的话是信得过的!” if I wanted to say "His word could be trusted!"


1

Wikipedia has several categories of serialization. I'll try to provide one example for each. With my lousy word-for-word translations. Note that there is no strict definition of the categories; Even serialization itself don't have a strict definition. Auxiliaries From 《老子》: 道可道,非常道。 -- Tao can tell, not common tao. Verbal complements In one of 元稹's ...


1

我即将去军校 is grammatically correct, but 即将 sounds too formal. Try this: 我很快就要去军校了。 I soon will go-to military-school le. Notice that I used 了 which marks the end of what I am saying. Otherwise a listener may expect that you have something more to say. There are subtle uses of 了 that may take pages to explain. If you want a formal form, 我即将去军校了 is ...


1

I do not agree with S.Rhee. It seems like here it is a name of a book or some TOEIC test preparation reference. Thus, the better translation in English would be: Essential for TOEIC


1

use iciba:(托业)TOEIC exam required


1

這麼些 can be directly translated to this many/much, 那麼些 is that many/much, and like it is in English, it doesn't necessarily mean "a lot": A: How much pizza did you eat? B: This much. A: I can see why you are so slim. If you do want to say "many", you want to use 這麼多 or 那麼多. Back to the original sentence, of course they can be put to the ...


1

Sentence as S There may not be such a thing. In English you might want to say That I came out of the closet surprised them all. While in Chinese you can have 我出柜惊了他们所有人。 Which is normally interpreted as I came out of the closet (and) surprised them all. Not quite the same. Sentence as O Plenty. 你知道我出柜了。 You know I've come out of the closet. ...


1

As far as i know, adverbs in classical chinese are put right in front of the verb, whereas in English their position is quiet freely. this is wrong ex: 跑的很快 run very fast 輕輕的開門 open the door softly In Chinese, we don't really care about grammar actually, sentences structure is not that strictly like English. Most of the rules of Chinese is by ...


1

'As far as i know, adverbs in classical chinese are put right in front of the verb', As far as my knowledge, it's not the case. In classical lecture of Chinese, the position of adverb are very flexible. There is some pattern, but still, very flexible. The trick in classical lecture: there are many order-reverse cases depending on such as what would be ...


1

乃, also means 就, which means "about to" in your sentence. You arrived just a moment ago, and about to go just like that?


1

你我 is a common way of saying 'you and me', and is sort of a contraction of 你和我. Therefore this translation is correct, and 呢 is something people say after a statement. Like 你我还有事儿得干呢 which means "You and me still have stuff to do."


1

The translation is accurate. 没完 means that there will be a continuation, and 呢 adds to this. Translations are not and should not ever be word for word, but adapted to the linguistic context. Chinese is not as wordy as, say, American English, and there is simply no need to sprinkle the text with repeated instances of pronouns (like 我) or words that can be ...



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