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12

该 is the formal equivalent of the word aforementioned or said: 该公司 - the said company 该法案 - the aforementioned legislation It is usually found in text to refer back to something that was mentioned previously. Informally, you can also use 那. Here is the meaning from 汉典: 那,著重指出前面說過的人或事物:~地。~書。


11

It's 50 000 or 50,000, the same as international standard. Reference: 出版物上数字用法的规定 (General rules for writing numerals in publications) 8 多位整数与小数: 8 Multidigit integers and decimals: 8.1 阿拉伯数字书写的多位整数和小数的分节 8.1 Segmentations for multidigit integers and decimals written in Arabic numerals 8.1.1 ...


11

一定 either introduces an INFERENCE, which is very likely to be true (as in the context of the given sentence), or shows a strong intention (in other contexts). On the other hand, 当然, equivalent to the English 'of course', indicates an inevitable consequence that the speaker KNOWS to be true. In this sentence, since the speaker is talking about himself, he ...


9

I am pretty sure that you have the second to last character wrong. It makes much more sense as 件 (item). Also, 折 should be read as zhé in this context. The character has a large number of meanings, but in this context it means discount (and the single digit numbers preceding it count by 10%; this is a common idiomatic construction for expressing ...


8

所...的 and ...的 are different. Function of ...的 As you have already known, ...的 can construct adjective clause. (我喜欢)+的+东西 (subject + verb) + 的 + noun = noun + which + subject + verb And in Chinese, the noun can be omitted in a clear context. In this case, ……的 constructs a noun clause. 我喜欢的(人)是你。 Who I like is you. (subject + verb) + 的 ...


8

I think Chinese textbooks should start their 了 sections with this: 了 is not about time. 了 is not about tense. Goto 1. You are only concerned with 了 as an the aspect marker, aka completed action 了, or perfect aspect 了, so: "昨天去商店" and "昨天去了商店" are both valid verb phrases. The second one explicitly states that the action was completed, whereas the first ...


8

The problem is not whether Chinese allows two question words in one sentence, it's that 什么 has multiple meanings. It can variously mean any, anything, whatever. In the example "你有什么安排吗", 什么 means "any", as in "Do you have any plans?" This is a very similar question to "do you have plans?", which is what "你有安排吗" is. By contrast, in the question "你有什么安排?", ...


7

不可, in the context of your question, is short for 不可以, which means "can't", not "don't". 不可吃 means "can't eat", perhaps it is inedible or passed expiry date. 不要 and 别 both mean "don't", but 不要 is stronger and more instructive than 别, example: 公共场所,请不要喧哗 (please don't make loud noises in public spaces) 不要 can be placed at the end of a sentence to mean ...


7

'Dates back to' is usually translated into '追溯到', which literally means 'trace back to'. When used in a sentence, people usually add 可以 (can/may) or 要 (have to) before 追溯到, for example: 这个城堡要追溯到罗马时代。 (The history of) this castle dates back to Roman times. 这个家族的历史可以追溯到十七世纪。This family can trace its history back to the 17th century.


7

G.Depardieu is Jean Reno's 二货朋友 in Tais-toi. Joey Tribbiani is the 二货朋友 in Friends. As Stan mentioned above, 二货 is an affectionate way to refer to a friend that may not be a genius but everyone loves him. 二: stupid. 货: buddy/man/stuff. More usage: 吃货 is one that admires good food(in a less graceful way). A refined 吃货 is a 美食家(gourmet). 女人如衣服 means "women ...


7

In the introductory Chinese courses I've seen they've taught two basic sentence structures: STPVO and TSPVO S = Subject T = Time P = Place V = Verb O = Object Your sentence sounds quite strange to me, and I think it's because you're putting the place in front instead of the time or subject. Either of these variations sound much better: ...


6

As others have mentioned, these are measure words (also known as classifiers*). To give a basis of comparison, in English measure words generally occur for uncountable nouns. For instance, because "bread" is uncountable, you cannot say "*three breads"; you must say "three loaves of bread" or "three slices of bread" ("loaves" and "slices" are the measure ...


6

I'm a native Chinese speaker. If you want a cup of coffee you could say 我要一杯咖啡 but actually, you should say 我想要一杯咖啡 Although "want" means "想要" or simply "要", "想要" is more standard and more polite. If you want to tell people that you really want something, you should say it in a polite way and couldn't in a simplified way. So you should say ...


6

The structure of Verb + Result Complement is used to describe the result of an action. Eg: 做完 看见 买到 说清楚 放下 抬高 忘掉 走开 走进去 打开 关上 ect. There are two ways to negate this structure: put negatives(不/没/别/不要/没有 etc.) before verbs, like 没做完 没忘掉 没看见 没买到 别放下 不要打开 没有走进去. This form of negation means that the action is NOT done(没有走进去/不走进去), or is asked to NOT be ...


6

This is probably easier with some punctuations: 用餐畢, 請隨手整理桌面。 座位有限, 請勿休憩佔用。 Let's break it down: 用餐畢: 用餐 means 'to dine' or literally 'to use meal'; 畢, short for 完畢, means 'to finish, to complete' (intransitive sense only); so altogether - 'after your meal'. 請隨手整理桌面: 請 - 'please'; 隨手 means 'while at it, while doing it' or literally 'to follow hand'; 整理 ...


6

This question is really tricky. As a native speaker, I would say it depends on what the speaker is trying to say here. It's really hard to explain so I put up some English translations that have very close meaning and tone to both 当然 and 一定 当然 I've been learning Chinese for 10 years, OF COURSE my level is very high. 一定 I've ...


5

的: positive response? Not exactly! The function of 的 is well stated in 漢典: 4 . 助词,用在句末, 表示肯定的语气 ,常与“是”相应:这句话是很对~。 At the end of a sentence, 的 is an auxiliary word, indicating a response with emphasized confidence. It is often used in the "是……的" structure. I think it's not proper to literally translate 表示肯定的语气 into "indicating a positive ...


5

1) (对)任何事情我都没有绝对的把握. There is nothing wrong in this sentence, but it focuses on personal belief, a little bit inclining to the speaker's subjectiveness. If we want to state something that describes a general belief, which focuses more on objectiveness, then we can say: 2) (对)任何事情 我们 都没有绝对的把握. 3) (对)什么事 我们 都 不可能有 绝对的把握. Sentence 2 generalizes ...


5

I assume the object in your question is actually a snowman 雪人 not just 雪. So I think it should be "婶婶找来几片叶子,给雪人弄了一双耳环". So we have in English: "Shen Shen found some leaves and made a pair of earrings for the snowman." If you check the dictionary meaning of 弄 you will see it is quite similar to the English make. In the Chinese sentence you have 弄了 so that ...


5

In English we say: Buy one, get the second for 40% off! Chinese is the other way round. They say: Buy one and get the other for 60% of the original price! 6折 means 60% of the original price So, 9折 means 10% off 85折 means 15% off 8折 means 20% off ... 1折 means 90% off


5

Just so you have another interpretation. As far as I read the sentence, 看得开 means "letting go" and 看不开 means "clinging on". Another hard point in this sentence is the structure "... 是好 ...也...". The original structure should be "...也好...也罢" which can be construed as "either... or..." or "for better for worse". Here 好 does not mean good. It just mean "if it ...


5

First of all, "There's stitches left behind (not removed) in my mouth, what should I do?" is a good translation. Yes,漏 can modify other verbs. It means someone forgot to do something or some action has been missed. Example: A:"How you feel about the question 31 in the exam?" B:"OMG, I didn't notice there was a question 31!" A:"刚才考试第31题做的如何?" B:"天啊! ...


5

Yes, 都 can refer to either subject or objects. When subject is plural, 都 refer to "all" of the subject. For example: 你们都来嘛?Are all of you coming? 同学们都交按时交了作业。 All of the students in the class handed in their homework in time. When subject is single, and object is plural, then 都 refers to "all" of the object. For example: 你把糖果都吃了? Did you ...


5

Both are correct, but the second one sounds more natural to a native speaker. 个 is omitted only in some idiomatic phrases like 一字一句 or 一字排开(though here 一 doesn't mean the number, but the shape of the number). In Chinese, it's more idiomatic to use a measure word between the number and the noun in most cases.


5

When 掉 is used as a verb complement (not a verb), it indicates that something disappears, is removed, is disposed of, etc. as the result of an action. Not really "falling" or "missing". Some examples: 擦不掉:Something can't be removed or got rid of by rubbing or wiping. Maybe it's a stain on your shoes, and you're trying to rub it off with a cloth, but it ...


5

The correct word to use in this context is indeed 得; however, because all three of these characters have the same pronunciation in Mandarin (de), they are very often confused by native speakers. This is similar to how some English speakers often confuse "there", "their", and "they're". For more information on the grammatical differences among the three, ...


5

Just to expand on Hugh’s answer a bit. To understand what’s wrong with ‘我作天去商店.’ standing alone, we could translate it as ‘Yesterday I was going to the shop.’ Speaking English, if you said this and just stopped, the listener would think, well so what? There are some verbs which are not used with 了 where a time phrase is enough to show past action. For ...


5

Depend on the context, 好 and/or 完 can be used. 好 is more oral friendly as there is no emphasize of any difference between the speaker and the listener. In some cases, using 好 may show a closer relation between the parties of conversation than 完. On the other hand, 完 is more formal. It is a better parallel to "finish" comparing to 好 as the latter has ...


4

I suppose this is a pattern that is to describe a subject, which can be interpreted by different terms, but you can combine them together as a whole, so as to explain it more dramatically. For the sentence you give, you can say a year has 4 seasons, and a year has spring/summer/autumn/winter. Then you can combine them together a year has ...


4

"所" is from ancient chinese or archaic chinese,“所+ vt” just denotes the object of vt,For example,“所思在远道”,but since Sui or Tang dynasty,there have been exceptions like “所守或非亲”,“所守"just denotes the subject of vt . In Mandarin,“所+VT” may be followed by “的” where you may omit 所to have a more speech-styled sentence,or may not be followed by “的” where the ...



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