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The original text is 游览路线也依旧如故,未长未短。Here 长 and 短 are verbs. The tour routes are same as before, not (become) longer, not (become) shorter. I think in grammatical analysis, there is no syntactic difference in Chinese verbs and adjectives (only semantic difference). You can think 未 as always modifying verbs, because all Chinese adjectives are grammatical ...


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Sometimes, Yes. For your example, No. 给 can work as verb(give) or preposition(for/by) Example: 他给了我帮助。(He give me some help)--your example 2. 他给我买了些吃的。(He buys some food for me)--your example 1. 他给狗咬了一口。(He is bitten by a dog) It looks confusing? A 给 B something: A give B something. Verb(give) A 给 B do something. Preposition(for/by) 1.If A is doing, it's ...


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Can “未” modify descriptive adjectives? I think so. 我把油画平放以防止未干的颜料流动。未干的颜料 not (yet) dry paint 那家公司已被卖掉,具体售价未公开。未公开 not public


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Yes, definitely. Disclaimer I am not nearly as proficient in classical Chinese, so my answer is limited to modern Chinese. IMHO, 未 is more commonly seen in formal context and is often used with 曾 or 從, as in 未曾 or 從未. For example, 單純的你,未曾憂鬱過。 You're such a simple person; you've never been depressed. 人生自古以來,從未順利。 Since the ancient times, life ...


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未=not yet So it would be safe to use with verbs. For example, 未来=(the time which has) not come yet=future. 未知=not known yet. I don't think you can use it with adjs.


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The short answer is yes, especially in written. It's kind of “文言文” so may hardly be seen in oral speaking. 游览路线也依旧如故,未长未短 Here “未长未短” means "it is neither longer nor shorter than before", in other words, "its (the route's) length is not changed". Let's read the whole sentence again and you will be clearer. ...


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I wouldn't agree with what your textbook claims to be the rule of thumb – although the rule technically applies, the common practice, as suggested in other answers, is that 几岁了 and 多大了 are applicable to all ages. A few things to keep in mind when asking for age: Beware that many adults are concerned with age. If you ask what's the minimum age that defines ...


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所 does not mean something here. It is used in Classical Chinese to clarify that the sentence is passive. Then, it is used in Modern Chinese to look formal.


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几, when used in declarative sentence, means several, as @DrunkenMaster pointed out, using it on quantities larger than 10 feels odd. However, this rule, when used in questions, is very relaxed. So you will see the following questions all the time 人有几颗牙齿? How many teeth do humans have 美国有几个州? How many states are there in the US And of course, 你几岁了 can be ...


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Your textbook is right. But usage might vary. 几 generally means few, the convention that its maximum is 10, that's why you can not ask someone looking older than 10 你几岁? Of course you could ask a little boy or girl 你多大?, that's not wrong, but do not ask an adult 你几岁/您几岁?, this wouldn't be appropriate. The only context when 几岁 could apply to adults is ...


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As you had said, 所 is not redundant. But to me, "有帮助" and "有所帮助" doesn't have that much differences, especially when you are in an oral conversation with Chinese people. As for your explanation for "有所謂", the translation for "这件案子有所谓" is "This case matters." You are correct. But I don't think that it has the meaning of "has something that it says". Yes, "謂 ...


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I found the answer myself but thought it might be helpful to others. Technically, 所 is not redundant; in this construct, it precedes a verb to refer to the object being acted upon by the verb. Nonetheless, in the example, 所 may be optional because each of 幫助 and 貢獻 can be a noun or a verb. Thus, the sentence has different literal translation with 所 ...


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Grammar only: In the case, "他十分坦率地给我讲了他的故事". We can trim it, then we have "他给我讲故事". You see it ends with "讲故事" (vt+noun). You can also change the order: "他讲故事给我" to make it "vt+noun to someone". 他很不情愿地给了我帮助 can be trimmed as "他给我帮助". You see it ends with "帮助" (noun). It is the object of 给 and 给 is vt. In case 1, if you replace 给 with 替 or 为, then the ...


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They are not interchangeable. The latter two have fairly narrow meanings in that kind of context: 替 means "on behalf of"; it could be translated as "for," but only in constructions where it clearly means "on behalf of," as in "He did my work for me." 為 wèi means "for the sake of"; again, it could be translated as "for," but only in constructions where it ...


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I hope this can give you a tiny help. ( how to use color-level layout?) No, They can't be replaced. xxx地(openly) It is a phrase of adverb. 给(verb) literally means give, for XXX In This Case: 他十分坦率地"给"我讲了他的故事. He openly/honestly told his story for me. If it replaces 替: the meaning will be different. 替 includes subbing meaning, as preposition can be used ...


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No. The words have different meanings. Let's look at your first sentence: 他十分坦率地[给]我讲了他的故事 : He openly told me his story. If we were to replace 给 with 替: 他十分坦率地[替]我讲了他的故事: He openly told his story for me (implying that I was supposed to be the one telling the story). If we were to replace 给 with 为: 他十分坦率地[为]我讲了他的故事: He openly told his story to me for my ...


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I can't find a resource to cite from, but here's what I know. In some grammar textbooks, whether Chinese or English, words like this are referred to as a Prepositional Adverb, or words that are very similar in its form to a preposition but functions as an adverb. EDIT I am not certain about this, but some say that 以後(后) is one of the post-positions, ...


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I think "after returning home" is an adverb phrase. "After" is the preposition as you said.


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Chinese has a number of post-positions (后置介词), instead of pre-position in English. But I have not seen an expert using this term. A preposition or post-position (介词) is a word that requests a noun (介词宾语) to form a phrase (介词短语). This phrase could be used as an adverb (介词短语作状语). For example, (1) 他们是工厂的工人. They are workers of the factory. (2) 桌子上有一本书. ...



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