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0

As a Chinese, I feel 日 is usually used in ancient Chinese or modern Chinese vocabularies from the old days, we use 日 in modern Chinese is because in some cases, we want to simplify the word, like 日光浴,basically means tanning, 日光 means sunshine, and 阳光 means sunshine too. So, if you say 太阳 in modern Chinese, in most cases, you're exactly fine. however, if ...


0

Usually, when we say "一定" under this circumstance, it sounds like the speaker is inferring something, so when you try to express the truth that you've learned Chinese for 10 years, and your Chinese proficiency is pretty high, you are not inferring this truth. For example, if you say that your friend has been learning Chinese for 10 years, and you think his ...


11

I'd like to offer a slightly different perspective from the other answers, and suggest that the most important difference between the two is that 太陽 is a free word, whereas 日 is a bound morpheme, i.e. it cannot appear as an independent word. Think of 太陽 as 'sun' and '日' as sol-. Of course they are not word for word identical with the English forms, but the ...


4

日 both means sun and day (and is short for Japan, etc.), but the most common meaning of 日 is day or daytime. E. g. : 每日 every day, daily 日志 journal, log 昨日 yesterday 日报 daily (paper) and many-many more. The only examples I can think of where 日 denotes the Sun and not day/daily are: 日出 (rì chū) sunrise 旭日 (xùrì) rising sun 烈日 (lièrì) scorching sun 红日 ...


2

The word used in modern Chinese is nearly always 太阳. In nearly all cases where in English you would use the word sun you can use 太阳. The only exception I can think of is 向日葵, which means sunflower. There may be some other compounds words or derivative words (solar) that use 日 instead of 太阳, but I think generally, it would be would be pretty safe to use 太阳. ...


6

Note: this answer may well be slightly incomplete. Usage of to that can be translated to 去 is the case only in specific settings. For instance, in English, I like to read books is grammatically correct. However, the Chinese equivalent would be 我喜欢看书: there is no addition of something like 去 before the verb (i.e. 看). Thus, at the very least, there is no ...


2

The other answers have mostly covered the issue , but I wanted to give my take on it, particularly since I stated I would in the comments and since one of my ideas hasn't quite been covered. Firstly, it's important to note that there isn't much of a direct, one-to-one correspondence between articles in English and "articles" in Chinese. There are a number ...


5

There is a lot that could be said here, but the basic problem is that Chinese just doesn't have articles, either definite or indefinite. Chinese is not the only language like this. Japanese and Latin don't have articles either. Here is the difference between English and Chinese in its simplest form: He is student. Not possible. He is a student. ...


6

I think ice cream is probably not the best example to demonstrate this, since it comes in many forms and some are counted as one ice cream (e.g. those that are attached to a stick), others as some ice cream (those that come in a huge platic box and you need to create portions and serve them to your family members). So I'll use a different example, something ...


0

Yes.It is common for "很" to be used before both monosyllabic and disyllabic adj. But when these types of adj./adv. are used, the front "是"are always omitted. For example,我很优秀(I am excelent), 我的国家很强大(My country is powerful). This mechanism covers most of the context. But you may use 我是很优秀,or 我的国家是很强大。It is not grammatically incorrect,but you will hold a tone ...


7

是 in the first context is only used to say: Noun1 是 Noun2 You never say 我是很好, because 好 isn't a noun. You can say 我是美国人 他是男孩子 我是李红 because all those relate one noun to another. In the case of 我25岁了, 25 years old isn't a noun, it's a state, and so we don't use 是. For a simple summary, 是 only relates 2 nouns to each other. If it's not a ...


3

就 here means ”just”. When you want to go, just go. 就 is very versatile, and has many uses. but this is the basic meaning. 的 is not related to 就 here, but to 时候. 的时候 means ”when”, ”the time when”, ”the time of (something)”.


2

的时候 is an interesting way to construct time markers in Chinese, it means "when (something happens...)". In your example, the whole 6 characters in 你想走的时候 are part of the ...的时候 construct, which matches your first translation, i.e. Whenever you wish to go, just go. or Anytime you want to go, just go. Well, the best resource to train your "parser" is just ...


2

You can try this to challenge your tongue. 四是四,十是十;十四是十四,四十是四十 Good luck with your tongue!


1

I suspect this may be an example of "Taiwan style Mandarin" 台灣國語. In the Minnan dialect, 嘛是 = 也是 (教育部臺灣閩南語常用詞辭典); this is also used in an emphatic form 攏嘛是 to mean "without exception", where 攏 = all (都). Put into Mandarin, it's equivalent to phrases like 都是這樣, or 專門做這種事 Rather than use 攏 long to write this Minnan expression however, some people write ...


0

To say "see you [anytime]" is just "[anytime] 见". 明天见 see you tomorrow 周四见 see you on Thursday 周末见 see you this weekend 明年见 see you next year 2016年见 see you on 2016 etc


3

As stated in another answer, it should be 这个周末见 (which emphasizes that it is this weekend) or 周末见. 末见这个周 is incorrect, because it breaks up 周末: the characters comprise the word for "weekend" and must be together. So it must be that 周末 and any qualifers (here possibly 这个) must be before 见. I could imagine 你 being thrown in as an object, but it is ...


1

They have pretty similar meaning and almost interchangeable in daily conversation but there are subtle differences between these three words. 可以 means you can do something 能 is used when you want to emphasise you have the ability to do something 会 means you are not only able to do it but do it proficiently There are a few examples: 我可以说中文 I can speak ...


2

Should be 这个周末见, or just 周末见, don't say 末见这个周. And yes, no need to throw in a 你.


2

It's okay grammatically, but not very challenging. 粗俗書生私下心想,「石上書寫『實事求是』四字似是敘寫世上數億心上思想,實屬喜事!」


0

In my opinion, 好多 has more personal feelings to it, while 很多 sounds more objective. For example, you want to express something amazing, you would use 好多. 好多好多狗狗,好可爱哦! If you want to describe a fact, you go with 很多. 这里有很多狗狗。


2

I somehow feel 一开始 is a bit earlier than if you use 开始 in term of time in the example "事情一开始进展得很顺利,但后来我们遇到了困难". So I tend to translate 一开始 as "at the very beginning" vs "at the beginning".


1

I tend to understand 一开始 as a whole, which means "at the beginning". You can omit the 一 in most situations without changing the meaning much. However, adding 一 (which alone could be interpreted as "once" or "as soon as") puts an emphasis on “beginning”, giving a hint that the speaker might later want to compare it with how things are like " in the end", or ...


4

Here, 一 should not be parsed by itself, but instead put together with 开始 to form the phrase 一开始, which means "at the beginning" or "initially". So the correct translation would be: 事情一开始进展得很顺利,但后来我们遇到了困难 At the beginning, everything was going smoothly, but later we encountered difficulties. Here are some more examples: 一开始,我不喜欢她。后来,我爱上了她。 At the ...


1

Maybe there is a subtle difference between 一 in 一开始 and 'once'. I feel that 一 emphasizes more about what is happening at that moment.


4

一 in this construction has the meaning of ”once”. Once the business got started it was very successful, but later on we encountered difficulties. Another example: 一看他的样子就知道他是个骗子。


0

The last dish you eat (最后吃的菜) may not be the dish that is served last (最后的菜).



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