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0

出商店去了 is fine with proper context. Other answers have pointed out that 出去 is an inseparable verb. I don't think it's the case. Instead, you use 出 as a single verb and use 去了 as a complementary. This matches the Verb Phrase + 去了 structure, as in 钓鱼去了, 吃午餐去了. However, when there is 出 in the verb phrase, people usually expect the 出 + Optional Place + VP + 去了 ...


0

This is a sentence structure that is commonly seen nowadays. For example: 他买苹果去了 他到美国去了 It means that (he) performed (some action) and he's gone doing it. In this case, he gets out of the shop and he's gone doing it. 他出商店去了 I think the catch here is to determine if the question is asking if 出去 can be used separately (which we can't), or if it's just a ...


0

出 and 去 are both verbs, you can't use both as separate entities. 出去 on the other hand is a resultative verb, you can't break it up. 从 (from) is here a preposition indicating direction. A similar expression would be 他到哪儿去了, where 到 (where/to) is the corresponding preposition.


1

why not? 连动句 Sentences with Verbal Constructions in Series。(兼语句 pivotal sentence) are of the type Subject + predicate_1 + (object_1) + Predicate_2 + (object_2), object_1 being subject of predicate_2 If predicate_1 originally is some common verb it can be preceded by a modal verb without violating the above structure,in given example predicate_1 is modal ...


5

the problem may be that the A被B C and A由B C are superficially similar but grammatically completely different. A由... seems like more a topic-comment structure for me, with A being the topic and "由B C" being the comment about the topic, not anything performed on the topic. 被 is conceptually linked to A - it is A having something done to it - whereas 由 is ...


1

被 has historically only been used for unwanted or negative actions, like 他被杀了. This is because 被 also means 遭遇 or catastrophe in general. Even if modern usage permits 被 as a general passive marker, 由 is more adequate for the reason given above. It is more neutral.


2

I'm not sure how your Chinese level is like now, but it's always useful to know that 被 (A) B isn't the counterpart of be B-ed (by A), because Chinese language lacks the notion of passive. The true meaning of 被 A B construction is, literally receive A('s) B-ing, or more practically let A do B to oneself. There are two more things I have to explain about the ...


0

As a Chinese, this is my first time meet this word. Just ignore that. Less than 0.01% people use that.


3

If you want to emphasize the responsibility, 由______负责。 由 has the meaning of 原由(reason). Some bad things may caused by 公司, or it is none business of the person, but 公司 hope to take responsibility. choose 由. If you want to emphasize the source or origin, 由 他 开始 count off. scandal 由 华尔街日报 report In other situations, you can choose 被 这件事 被 公司解决。


0

都 here carries a similar meaning as "usually". i.e., "What goods does your mini online shop sell usually?"


1

You may certainly use 在 to reference time, and you can negate it thus: 不是在八点起来,而在九点才起来。 You do need to use 是 though, otherwise 不在 will take on the meaning of existence or location. However, using 没 is more common: 八点还没起来,而九点才起来。 In both cases you are not negating time itself, but the action taking place at a certain time. This is logical, in any ...


4

I am a bit confused by the 在 in your example sentence, since you don't need it there, 我不在8点起床,我(在?)9点起床。 Frankly, I wouldn't know what this sentence was supposed to mean, if you hadn't provided a translation. If you want to express that something occures at a certain time of the day, e.g. X o'clock, there is no need for 在, just use X点 or X点钟. As for the ...


5

A quick browse on Google Scholar yields a few results. Macau Cantonese appears to be intermediate between Zhongshan Cantonese and Hong Kong Cantonese. There is only one rising tone derived from Middle Chinese 上聲, which is pronounced closer to the lower one of Guangzhou and Hong Kong Cantonese. This brings it closer to Zhongshan Cantonese. However, this ...


0

Cantonese from Macau and HK are almost identical


6

首先,这是一个方言用语(很可能是四川一带某地的方言),并不是汉语常用的规范用语,但用在这部小说里是正确的,反映出了人物所处的地域,正确地体现了人物的性格特征。 “三神不挂二神”,意思的确是“精神不集中,不安心,不专注”,神指的是“精神”,比如“心神不定”,“神智恍惚”等等。 其实“三神不挂二神”和汉语中的一个成语“三心二意”是相通的,可以将其视为一种方言变体。 “三神”是古汉语中的习用词,可有很多意思。“三”往往用于实指或虚指数量,如“三元”、“三军”、“再三”,等等。 而“三”和其他数目字又常常连用构词,比如“二”或“两”就常常用来搭配构成习语,如“三心二意”、“三长两短”、“三天打鱼两天晒网”等等,这里也是类似的用法,是某地的方言而已。 i.e. First of all, this is a ...


5

Your answer is incorrect. The subject of your sentence is 学经济的人 (people studying economics, "study-economics-people") and your predicate is 多 (many). So putting it altogether: 学经济的人(很)多。 (positive) or 学经济的人不多。 (negative answer).


1

So is it a bit like: 你在你的小网店里在卖什么都?but somehow the 都 got shoved over? I have heard 都 being used at the end of the sentence and it should be the same meaning as your original sentence, but where I grew up, I would say the 都 before a verb is more commonly used if not more grammatically correct.


6

都 is an adverb. The subject is 你(的)小店. 你最近都在做些什么啊? 你都去过那些地方? 你平时都听些什么样的歌? 你都怎么想的? ... When 都 is used, the question sounds less specific. The speaker either expects a long or complete list, or expects the listener to elaborate at length or in detail.


1

The seller is “You". The question can be translated as "What products are you selling in the store you opened online?" Removing 都 would not affect the meaning of the sentence too much. 都 loosely indicates that the addressee of the question, desirably, should attempt to include all categories of products in the answer, instead of only listing a portion of ...


0

Generally speaking, it is impossible to express the difference you intend just by changing verb form. 是, adjectives, and many other verbs are stative and they do not shift the reference time. We must either use particles like 了 or 过, or temporal adverbs like 以前 to set the reference time to the past. Dynamic verbs are usually accompanied by particles and ...


2

You could remove 都 here and the basic meaning would be the same. The meaning of 都 in this sentence is: 4 (used for emphasis) even -CC-CEDICT So if we took the 都 out: 你网上小店卖什么东西啊? What does your online shop sell? Now if we add the meaning from 都 above we get something like: What the hell does your online shop even sell?


0

I can imaging how this conversation came into being: Lily: Angela, aren't you working at a company? Angela: No. I was a secretary there 5 years ago. Tough job. I quit after I gave birth to my baby. The translator, being a properly educated Chinese, thought "Isn't this the case where I should give a logical answer to this question? My junior ...


0

As a native Chinese speaker, without any additional context, I assure you Yingzi misspoke. Lily clearly meant, "Aren't you working for a company?", with a hint of "I remember you told me you were / I'm sure you are". If Yingzi has quit, she should answer "I was, but not any more." I suggest you to not bother too much about this, treat it as an error of the ...


4

Think about it like this. Let's say we recap this conversation in English, but omit any tenses: L: Yingzi, be not you working for a company? Y: Yes, I be. 5 years ago, I be a sectary blah blah. Then I quit. You would have no problem inferring the tense of these sentences, right? Chinese language is just like that. It doesn't depend on using different ...


2

Well, again, some context would be useful here. However, I'd venture a guess and say that Yingzhi has not lied, and that in responding with an affirmative she was affirming that she was a current holder of a job, and that her description of the harsh working conditions was of her previous job. In other words: 莉莉:英子,你不是在一家公司工作吗?, 英子:是的。not 英子:没有啊。 ...


1

"和" here means "and". The subject is omitted. Usually it is "This", "I", "We", "My something" or "Our something". 和西方人过圣诞节差不多,这是一个全家团聚的节日。 is the same as 我們和西方人过圣诞节差不多,这是一个全家团聚的节日。 or 我們過年和西方人过圣诞节差不多,这是一个全家团聚的节日。 For simplicity, you can understand this way. (The way of) Our festival and Westerners' Christmas are pretty much the same. The omission ...


0

和 means compared to here and 差不多 means similar. You could also have ”和西方人不同的是,中国人认为...“ meaning contrary to westerers, the chinese think...


1

English 'be' is a mixture of at least 3 old verbs. That is why it is so irregular. In Spanish we have the same situation as Chinese: 'ser' = be, am = 是 and 'estar' = be in a place or situation = 在。 English, sadly, formally lost this distinction, but in reality, it is still there.


0

1) Are these sentences all good Chinese? Not quite. Structurally they look fine. But you shouldn't use 缺 with 职位. The correct word is 空缺 as the other answer suggested. 请问您这个职位空缺了多久了? 请问您这个职位空缺多久了? 请问您这个职位空缺了多久? 2) Is there any difference in meaning between them? No. But there are other differences. The 2nd and 3rd ones are literally the same. Any ...


2

As oloopy answered, you can't say 回去 a location, just use 回 a location, such as 回美国,回家,回北京 Plus, I think there're 2 use scenarios for 回去 回去了 a) it means a state that someone has left current place and already went back to where he/she stays, for example, you and your girl friend attends a party and it's midnight now, she left in advance, when a friend of ...


3

You should say 回___去. And usually you can omit 去. e.g: 回家去。/回家。 回火星去。 /回火星。 There're only some subtle differences in tone and emotion depending on the context. While some would suggest that 回去___ is grammarly correct, usually it is phonetically strange. As a native speaker, I would prefer 回家去吃饭 over 回去家吃饭. The logic (if there are any) behind this ...


1

Both work gramatically. Obviously saying 回去 standalone requires context. Examples with a location: 回去香港看父母,回去办公室拿东西。The character 去 can be omitted. For example 回家吃饭 回家乡亲 is neater and more colloqial than 回去家里吃饭 回去家乡探亲。


1

You would probably only use "回", more specifically, "回我家乡". Chinese usually use "回去了" without following a specific location when greeting.


0

我是+ n. 我是一个学生:I am a student. 我在+ v. 我在游泳:I am swimming 我在+ n. 我在家:I am at home


-1

The first one is better, just like you are asking somebody. you can say any one of those sentence and people can understand. By the way, you can say 请问您这个职位空缺了多久了


1

They are almost the same, but the first and second sentences keep the last 了, so they are more colloquial. And the third one omits the last 了,so it sounds more serious. In Chinese, 了 sometimes can express a kind of state, for example, 自行车修好了,the bicycle has been fixed. 吃过了,I have already eaten. Here, the second 了 is a modal particle.


2

Actually, this is some quite advanced writing. And no, there's no such a thing as run-on sentence in Chinese. At least not exactly as in English. The structure used in this article is called 排比(parallelism, http://zh.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%8E%92%E6%AF%94). Parallelism is "a balance within one or more sentences of similar phrases or clauses that have the ...


1

我是 means 'I am something', while 我在 in your sentence is the abbreviation of 我正在, which means 'I am doing something'


3

Yes. 是 (verb) means "is, am, are, to be, yes" while 在 (verb) means "at, to be in, to exist", or is a short form of 正在 (adverb,) which is used to indicate an action in progress. 是 is the confirmation of a state of being, whereas 在 is a confirmation of a location, or indicates that you are in the middle of/in the process of doing something. 是 (verb) + ...


1

This is really perfect writing. 尽管随后余佳文在微博上专门发文针对知呼上对其学历、融资额、用户数据等等质疑做了相应回应,但是从舆论上(余佳文)依然负面不断,尤其是与之前马佳佳的炒作放在一起,总的来说(余佳文)给人一种90后创业者“不靠谱”的感觉。 You can see the whole sentences has one common subject-(余佳文). And you can find associated words are used to combine the short sentences. I know you confused why not divide them into two part at the beginning of 尤其. ...


4

The components are: 你不听: "you don't listen", of course. 不就 ... (吗): colloquial element, "isn't just that...?", "nothing other than..." (analyzed into 就 + rhetorical question) 得了: colloquial element, "fine with it", "enough" Put all together: 你不听不就得了(吗) lit. You don't listen to him, then isn't it just fine? "Why don't you just ignore him!" or "Is ...


-1

I'll add a bit more into your formula: S + time + at... + from... + with(someone) + with/using(tool) + to/for(someone) + [把(O)] + V + 了/过/着 + O + 了 + 吗/呢/吧/啊 In Chinese: 主 + 时 + 在 + 从 + 跟/和 + 用/坐 + 给 + [把(宾)] + 动 + 了/过/着 + 宾 + 了 + 吗/呢/吧/啊 That's what I've figured out so far. It might not be that accurate.


-1

Well,it contains a lot of information in one sentence.In my view,the weakness of this article is paragraphing.The author tried to gather the information in one sentence regardless of paragraph.


2

1.我还以为他不走了呢! 2.我还以为他不走了! 3.我以为他不走了呢! 4.我以为他不走了。 "我还以为他不走了呢" which means"我以为他不走了"can be translated "I thought he'd not leave."In this sentence,we use"还"and"呢"to emphasize,which as you mentioned,indicated ‘unexpectedness’. "还……呢"means emphasis.It can indicate more than unexpectedness. Here some examples. -我还没吃过呢! -I haven't eat yet. “了”is a perfective ...


-1

As far as I know, 不...了 means "not...anymore". So I guess the sentence should be "I still thought he wasn`t leaving anymore".


1

只 is the measure word for boats, birds, some animals, some containers, and one of certain paired things, e.g. 一只船 [yī zhī chuán,] 两只老虎 [liǎng zhī lǎohǔ,] 两只手 [liǎng zhī shǒu.] 只 is also the character for the adverb only/just/merely, when pronounced as [zhǐ.] 支 is the measure word for long, thin, inflexible objects, e.g. 一支香烟 [yī zhī xiāngyān,] 两支笔 [liǎng ...


2

I am a native speaker, but keep in mind that some native speakers suck at grammar. 呢 just adds to the tone and doesn't really mean much, but if left out in some sentences, the sentences would not sound natural. I guess you're right about the “以為‧‧‧呢” sentence pattern. 了 here indicates an action done, like the past participle tense. 不走了 means "(decided) ...


0

但愿 但 means only. 愿 means hopefully. So 'if only' is the most accurate translation of 但愿


1

聊斋 is the name of the study room of the author. 斋 means a small room or house. 聊 is the name of that house. In ancient China, a writer usually refers himself with the name of his room or his hometown. The author 蒲松龄 called himself 聊斋先生. 志异 means to record something weird. 志 usually is used as a noun such as 日志 (daily record or log), In classic Chinese, ...


3

Syntactically they are the same. 地 following adverb can be omitted in spoken language and in many cases, written language too. In ordinary cases, the omission does not change the meaning or the tone of the phrase. In your example, however, the meanings are different. As the other answer suggested, 慢慢地来 is just an ordinary phrase meaning come slowly; proceed ...



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