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The answer by Camila Ting Chen is close. We don't use 再次 in an present active sentence. We use 再次 with some perfectness or passiveness. Such passiveness is not necessarily related to the conjunctive 被 however. A simple rule is when we can say 再 alone, say it alone. 我再次来到这家餐厅。 我时隔数年再次遇到一位朋友。 这盘菜再次被我吃掉了。 while this sentence is not logical at a first glace, ...


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When the 再+ verb, normally, we dont use the 次. Let's look the sentence again, “我再要一盘”, here “要” means want, is a verb,so, just use 再+verb. If you say: “我再次要一盘”, weird, but not wrong, we can understand.


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我再次要一盘 should exist in 陈述句 我再要一盘 should exit in 祈使句 As you are asking the waiter, it's 祈使句.


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我再次要一盘 is "I want the dish again." 我再要一盘 is "I want another one." It's one of those things that you can say it and people would know what you mean. But it just sounds off.


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I think "一下" mostly emphasize "I'll be back soon"or"I'll not let you wait for a long time",it's necessary to use "一下" when you borrow something or you can say"能把你的……借给我吗". And other times it's same as "一会儿". You shouldn't say"还一下",just like you shouldn't say "I'm giving your book back to you". I think someone use like "我去学校踢一下儿足球。" is just some people's ...


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I'm Cindy Li, a native Chinese teacher from iChineseLearning. Hope my answer will help you! 一下 after a verb can have a number of uses, but let me try explaining the simplest and most obvious use for you. You can translate 一下 as "a bit/ a short while". It's often added to the verb to make the verb sound less serious, less formal (and if use appropriately, ...


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I am Cindy, a native Chinese teacher from iChineseLearning. This would be the correct translation: 1. 给我礼物 - Give me (a) present. 2. 给谁的礼物 - Whom is (this) present for? 3. 这是给谁的礼物? The third sentence actually has the same meaning as the second one. It just put an emphasis on 这 (this). If you have further questions, you can raise your question at here: ...


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Sometimes it is not possible to just build an expression without changing the meaning of the rest of the sentence. I would translate these into English as: Give me (a/the) present (给我礼物) A/the present to give to who? (给谁的礼物) This is a present to give to who? (这是给谁的礼物) If it was the expressions that you intended: Give me a present (给我礼物) Give who a ...


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Literally, following Chinese syntax: This is give who(m) 的 present. English: Who is this present for? So I would say 1 and 2 are correct, but 3 might be better as above.


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I'd say all the usage of "一下(儿)" in the examples given in the question are legit. My dictionary (Modern Chinese Dictionary came with Mac OS X) doesn't say any there is any special cases for the usage of 一下 after a verb. And my personal experience as a native speaker suggests the same. First let me try to further explain the usage of "一下(儿)". One can ...


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In most cases,it's like "一会儿" in Chinese.They both mean that you are going to do something for a short while or are used to make the conversation sounds natural,don't really mean anything.


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I read the post on 學 vs. 學習, and I think one of the answers that was downvoted actually gave a pretty good speculation that agrees with my thinking and also one of the answers provided already. In summary, I think learning/學 is a more inclusive term (as is often the case in Chinese when there is less characters) that does have a passive quality about it, ...


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In general, the answer would be "A,B还是C?"


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请问,您是学生,老师,还是来参观的? 请问 = May I ask


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In fact, the sentence "我去学习踢一下儿足球。" is right. I often use this expression and I am a Chinese. The phrase "一下儿" is equivalent to "for a while".


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I do think they have different connotations: 學 has a more passive tone (you could even 'accidentally' learn something) 學習 implies an active effort


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一下儿 could be used for a short time or a less important matter. 你到我们家来一下儿好吗? Could you please come over my home? 我今天不舒服, 你和老师说一下儿好吗? Could you please tell our teacher that I do not feel very well? In English, it is not necessary to translate it word by word.


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In English it's correct to say "I'll borrow your membership card for a little while", but wrong to say "I'll return your membership card for a little while". Why? Since the membership card belongs to you, the action of returning results in something long-term or permanent, and "returning for a little while" makes no sense. The same is true for the two ...


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一下儿 here indicates a brief period or relaxed and casual manner of an action. 我去学校踢一下儿足球 -> For a while 我借一下儿你的会员 -> For a while 我想亲你一下 -> Relaxed and casual manner As to "我还一下儿你的会员卡", it sounds weird because it can neither fall into "for a while" nor "relaxed and casual manner"


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'learn' comes from an old meaning of 'follow a track, find a track' from a word related to German 'Gleis' = (train) track. 'learn = get knowledge, study' Latin 'studium' study, application, originally comes from studere meaning 'be diligent'. From 1300 it has the meaning 'apply oneself to the acquisition of learning' How much difference can there be ...


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All sentences are very good. 我比你来得早多了 is good. But it also can be, 我来得比你早多了. It is for adverbs. But for adjectives, you cannot do that. 我比你高5厘米 (correct), but 我高比你5厘米 (not right). An alternative could be: 我的身高超过你5厘米. Here you do not use 比 explicitly.


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我说汉语比你说汉语说得更好 (A V O) 比 (B V O) (V 得 adv intensity) Complex enough?


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I think the original post gave some very good examples of what can go between a the verb and object in the verb-subject structure. To generalize, you can put something in between the verb-object structure to modify the verb, something to modify the object, or both. For simplicity's sake, let's call them adverb and adjective. Using the original examples, ...


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Strictly speaking to the questions, 我走了 is a pretty common sentence that everyone knows it's an about-to-happen action. Everyone knows it can be an about-to-happen action in the right context. Without any context, however, it still strikes me as a past action as in "讲座你听完了么?""没有,我走了". without any context, ... , is there a chance that a native ...


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了 in "我去中国了" does not emphasize it is a past or future action in absent of context. Consider the following: 我去年去中国了 - I went to China last year 我明年去中国了 - I will go to China next year Both are legit and 了 changes depend on the content, althought a native speaker will say: 我去年去了中国 - I have been to China last year 我明年(要)去中国了 - I have to go to China ...


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For a future action, there must be 要, 就要. It means "it is the time to do it", not exactly future action. For true future sense, say 将要. The key is more in 要 than in 了. 他去中国了 verses 他要去中国了. If you are the speaker, keep it for safety. Say, 他已经去中国了 versus 他就要去中国了.



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