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14

This is a very interesting question. I am sure you can understand that even in English there are tons of ways to greet one single friend. It also differs from regions. Below I am listing some of the typical/common ways we greet people. People you've just met: 你好!= hello. 很高兴认识你! = very glad to meet you. For acquaintances: 你好吗?= how are you doing? ...


13

This does happen every now and then. It is just a way of expressing enthusiasm to see you. And from experience it won't go on forever, usually just a second time, but sometimes people will say "你好, 你好" or even "你好, 你好, 你好" in a row. Think of it as a handshake, it is not going to go on until it is awkward, just showing some enthusiasm with a couple of extra ...


12

From the accepted answer at Baidu: Both are words of greeting. Nowadays people generally use “早上好”. “早安” will give a feeling of before 民国 (the Republic of China (1912-1949)), or a literary feeling (it's common in literature). Other people think 早安 has a warmer feeling. Of course this is the perspective of mainland people. In Taiwan 早安 is used ...


10

I can't even imagine this scenario - but supposing they say 你好, and you replied that is where it should end. If they went on to say 你好吗? You could obviously reply 我很好,你呢? or words to that effect, but that should really be the end of any 你好 exchanges. I've never had a never ending 你好 exchange, and I'd be pretty confident in saying it isn't common. Hope ...


9

Normally we use the verb "点" 你点啊? leih dim a? English: What's up? (less formal) 你点样啊? leih dim yeung a? English: How are you doing? (more formal) 你近排点啊? leih gan pai dim a? English: How have you been doing? 你呢排点啊? leih li pai dim a? English: How've you been lately?


8

很高兴见到您。 means glad to see you. It's usually used if you know (or heard of) someone for a long time, but haven't seen him/her for sometime(first time in case of heard of). For example, you would use 很高兴见到您 to greet someone you know from the internet. It's a bit weird to say 很高兴见到您 to someone you know very well or see everyday. If it's the first time you ...


6

In Chinese culture, being over polite is never too much only except for between really close friends. Especially when getting along with an elder person, you should keep being formal and polite until you're really really close with that person. So even writing to a person that I'm familiar with, have a good relationship with and maybe hang out together a ...


6

Yes, "亲爱的" does indeed has a slightly different connotation to the English "Dear". It is not used as liberally in Chinese letters and emails. "亲爱的" expresses a closer relationship than "Dear" does. The following are situations where you may or may not use it: When is it definitely OK: you writing to your spouse you writing to your lover you writing to your ...


6

Yes it's in actual use. But you need use it carefully, because "你们好" is always used when famous people meeting their fans, or teacher meet there students. If you are meeting elders or in honorific expression, you should use "您好" to each person, even if there are many people at the same time.


5

Yes there are. Such language in Chinese is referred to as 回回话 Huíhui huà. Thanks to user xiaohouzi79 for pointing out the book Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic By Dru C. Gladney, which is partly viewable on Google Books. This book contains a large appendix, A Select Glossary of Hui Chinese Islamic Terms on pages 393 to 421. Here ...


5

This is not a complete answer, but will probably supplement others you get. While working in Beijing I always heard colleagues greeting each other in the morning with just 早 (zǎo) instead of the full 早上好 (zǎo shang hǎo). This is quite similar to what we do in English, using "morning!" as a greeting instead of "good morning!"


4

Here are a selection that I have received via email from friends and family: 一切顺利 Yīqiè shùnlì - Wish everything goes smoothly 一切平安 Yīqiè píng'ān - Wish every thing is peaceful 一切好 Yīqiè hǎo - Wish everything is good 回头再聊 Huítóu zài liáo - Talk to you next time 祝你一路平安 Zhù nǐ yīlù píng'ān - (For those going on travel) Wish your trip goes smoothly / ...


4

You can search "蛇年祝福语" online, but most of the results are artificial and aren't as classy as the 龙 ones. If you look up for Chengyu's that contain 蛇, you'll see the majority of them are negative, due to snake's symbolic meaning in Chinese culture. Even novelists complained that it's very difficult to come up with greeting lines with 蛇. The last link ...


4

恭喜发财 may not be the best greeting word from student to teacher, but it's not awkward - the intention is always good. For example, parents usually wish children with good health, striving and studying. If a parent greets children with wealth, you may find them funny, fashionable or friend-like, but definitely not mammonish or evil. In old Chinese ...


3

Yes, there are a whole range of greetings similar to "你好", including "你们好", “大家好”, “老师好”, and so on.


3

Slightly off-topic, an alternative to 早安 in Taiwan is "吃飯了沒有?", literally "have you eaten, yet? " . You may hear this more among older folks who experienced lean times in their youth, and also reflects generosity of the speaker.


3

早 is not morning, it means "early" in general. 我早知道了!吃早饭。 早上 is morning in general. 早上好! 早晨 is also morning, but earlier, at daybreak, in the very early morning hours. The day is divided into twelve 时辰, where 寅时 is before dawn, the 凌晨. Then comes the 卯时 between 5 and 7, the 黎明, the dawn. 辰时 is the next two hour period between 7 and 9, the 早晨. After 9 ...


3

@StarCub pretty much covers it, so I'll just add: 看到你我很开心 I'm so happy to see you Another one which is quite common, but doesn't have the same meaning as your question: 好久不见了 Long time no see!


2

About 你吃饭了么: It is maybe more common to say 你吃了么? or even simply 吃了么?. And it is not necessarily rice, but any meal (except breakfast). So the translation to English should be Have you eaten? This is used more commonly during the time period after lunch or after dinner. There are jokes about this, e.g. two guys met near toilet but asking each other ...


2

believe or not, they may say hello. If it's some good friend, maybe their nick name.


2

恭喜发财 is a customary New Year's greeting... I would think it's generally understood to be said during these times. She may just have an issue because you wrote it to her... Usually this is a spoken term, followed by "红包拿来" ("Red Envelope, please!")... but it's usually just kids that get the red envelops...


2

很高兴认识你 is usually used when FIRST meeting with someone, while 认识你,我很高兴。is more used after knowing each other for a while, could be just minutes, hours, and even days or months, to express the feeling that "I'm really happy to have a friend like you" Another good one could be: 认识你真好 at first meet,literally it means to get to know you is really good.


1

The other answers are correct translations, but saying "nice to meet you" is not a common social etiquette in China, according to my life experience. If I meet someone for the first time, and he said this to me, I may feel weird. Maybe this makes people feel you are too enthusiastic. Perhaps saying 你好 and then shaking hands is enough in some formal ...


1

很高兴认识你 ---- Common 认识你,我很高兴 ---- Common 如果给高兴一个定义,那就是认识了你 ---- It is a humor way that I liked. Someone might be moved to tears if you say this, so don't use it easily.


1

to your gf, you just say, 亲爱的,在新的一年我会更爱你呀。 Honey, I will love you more in the coming new year


1

Hm, Chinese New Year is not just between BF and GF, all Chinese celebrate Chinese New Year. I think this is the reason why someone voted down this question, but never mind, there is something much more important. Since you asked. and there must be related with Chinese New Year, greetings, GF. I think you can say... ok, here we go. honey, ...


1

36 phrases to say hello in Chinese - audio in link. http://chinesespeak.com/hello-chinese/ Saying hello 你好! Pinyin: nǐ hǎo! Meaning: Hello. 您好! Pinyin: nín hǎo! Meaning: Hello. Used when addressing seniors or superiors to show respect. Time-based greetings 早上好! Pinyin: zǎo shang hǎo! Meaning: Good morning! 早安 Pinyin: zǎo ān Meaning: Good ...


1

To answer you question, the difference between 早 and 早晨 is 早 means early by itself, however, in this case 早 means early part of the day, which is morning! In Chinese it is rarely to use just one character to convey an idea, so 早上 (upper part of the daytime) is used to mean morning. 早晨 means the time between early morning (凌晨 00:00-06:00) and morning ...



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