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11

I know exactly the thing. There's a project on Wikimedia commons to document the substructure of characters in terms of other characters. I haven't spent much time with the data itself, so I can't tell you how complete it is, but it seems pretty good based on my experience with the Tatoeba character search tool that is based on the data. That tool allows you ...


9

TL;DR : 饣 is the phonetic, not the signific. 饣, which is simplified from 食, is the radical of 饰/飾 only in the sense that it is listed that way in a Chinese dictionary. It is not the meaning-bearing part of the character. Here are two possible analyses. In both cases, 饣 is contributing to the pronunciation, not the meaning: 飾 = 食 (phonetic: shi2) + 布 ...


8

According to zdic.net, 饰 is formed of 巾, 人, and 食 (饣). 食 (饣) is the sound component, while the other portion suggests the meaning. The dictionary explains the character's components this way: 形声。从巾,从人,食声。人佩巾有装饰作用。 So, it's a 'pictophonetic' character which signifies a person wearing or adorned with a cloth, thus having the effect of decoration. If you're ...


7

Q1: Could I use a character like 飂 for my name? Yes. In fact, you can freely choose any character for your name. However, for whether it is a good Chinese name, there may be many criteria. The most important criteria are supposed to be: Elegant meaning. 飂 is a good one, meaning gone with the wind and implying a noble, unsullied, lofty, and proud ...


7

The 坊 in 金马碧鸡坊 refers to 牌坊. There is a 金马牌坊 and a 碧鸡牌坊 as mentioned in the Wikipedia article. In the olden days, an arch known as 牌坊 is used to mark the entrance to a city subdivision. From Wikipedia: The largest division within a city in ancient China was a fang (坊), equivalent to current day precinct. Each fang was enclosed by walls or fences, ...


6

I found the same situation, living in China for quite some time, and unlike some other people who have answered, I understand exactly what you're asking. It was quite annoying to try to learn new words when the native speaker just tells you the meaning of 3 characters together and doesn't know or can't explain each character's meaning. I think the answer is ...


5

I personally believe that every character has its function in the sentence, but not all characters have a "translatable" meaning. Many characters, when they are added to the sentence, don't change the literal meaning of the sentence, but may create an emphasis or introduce a certain emotion, and there is no English equivalent to this phenomenon. Maybe that's ...


4

It's just historical stuff. European countries that have commerce with China prior to the Ching dynasty and also modern countries after WWII, in general have fancier names. 希腊 for Greece 意大利 for Italy 瑞典 for Sweden 法国 for France 美国 for US 葡萄牙 for Portugal 马来西亚 for Malaysia 日本 for Japan etc. You just have to accept them as it is. It's hard to find a ...


4

I believe for 印 the 1st one is correct. 氏 is written in this order: . The first 3 strokes are exactly same as those first 3 stroks in 印. Consider the following characters: 卯, 留,齊(齐). We finish this part first, , then add the next strokes, which are 丿, 丶, and ㇏ respectively. But if you make the font of 印 like this, the 2nd order in your question is correct. ...


2

Let me connect the dots for @EdenHarder (but comment box is too narrow...) Explanation 漢文 夫飾者 形聲字也 據典[1]之二五七二頁 然竊以為會意也 參此及此 殷商有祭祀者 食諸神袛以祭牲 飾牛牲以布匹 苟無食 何以有飾 飾者 从巾 从人 食聲 讀若式 一曰襐飾 賞隻切 據典[2] 恭候有疑 English Signific or phonetic, imagine in an ancestor worship or toward a deity in ancient times (e.g. Shang), people present with food, covered with cloth; or ...


2

Yes and no. Yes, you can use it as long as it is a real Chinese character. However, as a native Chinese with a rare character in my own name, it bothers me in life in various ways. First, some people don't know how to pronounce it. Second, some banks and airplane companies still limit their database of Chinese character to GB2312 which includes only about ...


2

You may use it, but you will be the uncalled one when the teacher makes a roll call. Because he will be confused about how to pronounce this character. In China, although characters are complicated, the basic elements you need to communicate are few, especially compared with hard-to-pronounce complex traditional characters. It may sound like someone named ...


2

Here's one way to do it which I figured out starting from some tips thanks to user2619 in the comments: Right click on the keyboard/IME icon in the system tray. Select "Settings" from the popup menu. The "Text Services and Input Languages" dialog will appear. Use the "General" tab. Under "Installed services" click on "Add...". Find the section "Chinese ...


1

“坊” has two meanings: fāng means “lane”. fáng means “workshop” I think that 金马碧鸡坊 is not the name of a square. We have a place called 田子坊, it’s a place that has lots of workshops and lanes, people can buy many handcrafts there. “Square” in Chinese should be 广场, and usually it could be a big place, like Tian’anmen square in Beijing. “Plaza” in Chinese ...


1

In my opinion, our name is used as our mark to identify. If your name owns a rare character, it makes others (friends around you) hardly recognize and called. The simple things just goes unfriendly. Although, I admit it is a cool idea, but not easy to me. Of course, you can try your best to figure it out -- a perfect name using other easy-read words. ...


1

You might come across the phrase 虛詞 which literally means "empty phrase" but refers to function words. I've heard people describe them as "meaningless" especially function words in classical texts but of course they have important grammatical functions. As for lexical terms, each character had a well defined meaning in Old Chinese but nowadays many of them ...


1

There are times when a character is inserted for emphasis. At such times, it can be said that the character in question has no ADDITIONAL meaning. An example is given in the following: 太: Meaning in 灰太狼 太 is the character with "no meaning" even though it has a "standalone" meaning of "too.'


1

Actually it's true that every character have their own meaning. But many of foreigner can't understand every character without merge into sentence. So, probably they would just answer it NO MEANING. But as a person who are very linguistic, they can answer what it mean and completely answer what it's mean. For foreigner, even they know it can mean what, but ...



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