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2

i checked briefly, the earliest usage of "砲響" and "砲聲" was in the book 錢塘遺事, by 劉一清 of 元 dynasty. 卷九, on page 49, it recorded the event in 揚州, on 德祐丙子二月二十日, which was march 7th, in the year of 1276. clearly, joseph needham is a marvellous scholar :)


3

Brewitt-Taylor's English translation of San-guo yanyi calls it a "bomb." This was a kind of "signal bomb" 號砲 or 信砲. The earliest real historical record of these seems to have been the Yuan dyansty, as Song Yuanyao's comment notes. Joseph Needham's volume on "The Gunpowder Epic" has a brief mention of the use of these, for instance in the Mongol attack on ...


0

According to Wiktionary, 砲 can be defined as a catapult. It is acceptable to me that there have been catapults for a long time, probably dating back to the Zhou dynasty (warring states period) or even earlier {{citation needed}}. In Chinese chess, there is a piece called 砲 or 炮. There are too many confusing sources for the origin of Chinese chess, so I'm ...


0

It's a quite interesting topic to discuss. I think 一 in 一聲砲響 is more like a correspondence to the 齊 in 一齊俱發 since a one big loud sound can indicate all catapults(or something else) at one time while several of them can not. So as the second example which has more of an emphasis of that sudden moment all hidden soldiers came out. With all description like ...


1

"三窟已就" means "all three holes have been completed". It comes from the etymology of "狡兔三窟", originated from 戰國策. A rabbit has three/several (according to the origin, it is indeed three) holes to live in, so if one is destroyed/occupied, it can still live in others. This is a metaphor when an adviser advises his master not to be overdependent on his current ...


0

From a letter of John Renfroe, CEO and Co-founder, Outlier Inc. I haven't looked into this character very much, but on a quick search (meaning I read the entry in 說文新證), here's what I've got. The ancient form in your post on stack exchange is 亯 over 京. That's how it was written from the Shang dynasty through the Warring States period. In Qin, it was ...


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According to the link you've given, 就 was defined like this: 就高也。从京从尤。尤,異於凡也。 就 came from 京(京城, the ancient version for "the capital city", probably talking about the gorgeous buildings) and 尤(special, different from the ordinary), so that's why it was meaning "tall, high". And it was used as a verb, meaning "to make (sth) high/tall/more special". It could ...


2

Perspective from Japanese The primary meaning for 就 in Japanese (which as you may know often tends to keep the Classical Chinese meaning for characters) is to "stick to", "arrive at", "become (something)" and is related to a word that is written with 「従」(从) meaning "follow" or "obey", . From that perspective I think your theory holds up well. I would say ...


4

reference: 现代汉语词典,第6版 (Contemporary Chinese Dictionary, 6th Edition). This dictionary gives 8 basic meaning items for 就. approach, get close to get to, begin to do passive, -ed by finish, become eat something (side dish) together with other thing (main course) [preposition] a: by, at somebody's convenience, take advantage of. b: about, concerning, with ...



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