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10

Before simply answering "there is such a font", I would like to seriously suggest you should not differentiate a dot and a slash. The reasons are: Many Chinese people don't distinguish them when writing, even calligraphers. We care about "fast" and "beautiful". The standard glyphs among mainland, Taiwan/Hong Kong, Japan and Korea, are usually ...


9

I like the pinyinput input method editor. Just type the letters for the syllable followed by a tone number, and it will combine them in the usual way.


6

I wrote the PinyinTones IME a couple of years ago to do exactly what the OP was asking about: http://pinyintones.codeplex.com/ PinyinTones a Windows IME that outputs Pinyin with tone marks, rather than Chinese characters. Type 1, 2, 3, or 4 after each syllable to add a tone mark -- just as people have been entering Pinyin since the days of ASCII ...


6

The OP is asking how to type characters, using a pinyin IME, when those characters have a ü in their pinyin spelling. For example, how do you type 绿=lü? This is different than asking how to actually type the letter ü. The answer is to type a v. To follow the example, change to the pinyin IME, type lv and select 绿.


5

Install input method tools such as Google Pinyin Windows only type u start to input then type follow to input radicals 丨 shu 竖 一 heng 横 丿 pie 撇 礻 shi 示 衤 yi 衣 But I think most easy way is Ctrl+C,Ctrl+V There is a list of radicals. Find it and copy it.


4

Use your own IME: 1) 2) Make sure that your IME is: 3) Choose "Phoetic" and directly input what you want.


4

You can use the Tablet PC Input Panel (whether you are on a tablet pc or not) by right clicking the taskbar, hovering over the toolbars submenu and checking tablet pc input panel If that option isnt available, you may need to install it by going to Control Panel -> Programs and Features -> Turn windows features on or off and checking tablet pc components ...


4

It depends on the OS you're in. On answers.microsoft.com I searched chinese and you can see the solutions for each OS from Microsoft. Just for completeness, let me add also a quick guide for the Mac OS X. You do the following: Go to System Preferences (you can reach it in the menu by clicking on the apple symbol on the top-left side); Click on "Language ...


4

Yes, you're right. The phenomenon of 豆腐 dòufu is the result of tone sandhi (连续变调 liánxù biàndiào). IME does not support tone sandhi, so you're unable to search for it as a neutral tone. The only accepted tone entry for 腐 is 3rd tone fǔ.


3

Many people in Hong Kong use Quick aka 速成 or Simplified Cangjie. There is a wiki link for this input method:Simplified Cangjie There is a build-in Quick IME in Windows and Mac. Most of the Quick users use it. Quick users type Chinese using Quick on smartphone too, as the build-in IME of smartphone that selling in Hong Kong usually support Quick. However, ...


3

I try to answer for the mainland China part. And I only mention Pinyin IME here because that's what I and the majority use. Windows: IMHO, the best Pinyin IME on Windows is Sogou Pinyin regarding match rate. As you might already know, Pinyin are not 1-to-1. Sogou Pinyin has the highest match rate of all IMEs I've used. I recommend you to try it if you're ...


3

As you are using the "Pinyin - Traditional" input method, maybe what you can see will only be the traditional character "嗎". To convert it into simplified Chinese, try this tool by pasting it into the blank and click the second button. By the way, sometimes we also use "麼" (or "么" in simplified form) at the end of a question. And the corresponding Pinyin ...


3

I found this site, robrohan.com, that has a page with a tutorial on how to set and use an application that remaps your keyboard. See also this question on Superuser SE, "How to type pinyin text with tone marks in Windows?", there are various resources in the answers, especially the main one.


3

Besides Windows OS-included IME's, there's: 搜狗 Sou Gou Pin Yin is my favorite by far. http://pinyin.sogou.com/ You can switch easily between simplified and traditional (if that matters to you), and you can download from several skins. 南極星 NJ Star is one I used for a while: http://www.njstar.com/cms/ Allows you to type in the tones (so you're forced ...


2

I would like to add new information to this post. I used 搜狗 Sou Gou Pin Yin as Growler suggest in his answer for this question. And now I really think that this is the best IME I ever used. But just a few weeks ago I installed the new Windows 8 and was pleased to find a new improved IME from Microsoft. It is pretty good, much better than the previous ...


2

Here's one way to do it which I figured out starting from some tips thanks to user2619 in the comments: Right click on the keyboard/IME icon in the system tray. Select "Settings" from the popup menu. The "Text Services and Input Languages" dialog will appear. Use the "General" tab. Under "Installed services" click on "Add...". Find the section "Chinese ...


2

I think you should use a fuzzy system instead of a strict one. The difference between 點(dot) and 捺(slash) is not always obvious even to native user. For example, in lower right corner of the character 木, the stroke is a slash, but when we writing the character 林, the slash become a dot in the left 木. Why? because there is no room to put a full slash there. ...


2

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/canton-guang-dong-pin-yin/id385519764?mt=8 or use stroke keyboard. Or ask Siri. The Cantonese version of Siri can understand Cantonese. Edit: Apple does not have such a keyboard and as you would know iOS does not allow custom keyboards. Anything suggested is a workaround. ...


1

This has very little to do with grammar. It is more likely making logical word associations. I have no idea what Cangjie is or how it works - but if you take out an iPhone or iPad or any iDevice and type in xin you can repeat the process that you just did in MacOS, i.e.: 心-->情-->舒暢 (these being the top recommended choices). Wikipedia talks about this here: ...


1

If you're asking for a jyutping IME you should specifically say so. From my own research jyutping is quite new and if it has any IMEs at all they are not yet popular and not available on iDevices at all. The input method that's popular in Hong Kong is called "cangjie". It is based on the shapes the characters are made from and not based on phonetics. I ...


1

As an alternative if to stay stick to Microsoft IME you can add Alphabetical Style Input Method Microsoft Pinyin. With that IME you can input pinyin with tone number. Although it's not perfect and not really convinient in Microsoft realization.


1

I use the Taiwan Pinyin.. You just have to add "Chinese (traditional, Taiwan)". It is by default set to bopomofo, so when you add the keyboard, you just have to go to properties, then to the last tab and change it to 漢語拼音. You can decide when you want to type with tones or not. If for example you want to type a sentence with a name on it, you just type ...


1

Try ZiGuang; you can use Shift + 1, 2, 3, 4 after typing a word to select the tone you want. If you want to find a Pinyin typing method in daily life, I recommend Google Pinyin and Microsoft Pinyin 2010 (a significant improvement over the one built-in to Windows) As far as I know, Microsoft Pinyin also supports typing with tones. However, I am currently ...


1

ZhengMa is rarely used in chinese.se, more people use PinYin and WuBi. ZhengMa have never been a mainstream type-in method. And One more thing, please use www.google.com.hk in Chinese to search what you want, not Baidu, which search result sorted by money website pay


1

I'm answering from an old memory, and can't know whether this is correct in any modern Windows system. Nevertheless: I think to remember that I installed ZhengMa for windows years ago. Then I changed the language to Chinese and got a help file in Chinese. This wasn't available in English. I'd assume that this help text is the best you get. But I just assume. ...


1

If you use Windows 7, there should be a text document within the Program Files that contains a comprehensive list of Chinese characters and their ZhengMa codes. On my computer it is found at C:\Program Files(x86)\Windows NT\TableTextService; it is called TableTextServiceSimplifiedZhengMa.txt I don't know if this exists on other operating systems. Hope it ...


1

So I've got an answer that works on both Windows and Mac (quite recently), which is Sogou Pinyin Input. The default Mac input system has terrible sentence generation, and the default Windows system is even worse, IMHO. Sogou is really fantastic, and quite a step up from either the Google Pinyin IME for Windows, or the recently-turned-freeware QIM for Mac ...



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