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10

Before simply answering "there is such a font", I would like to seriously suggest you should not differentiate a dot and a slash. The reasons are: Many Chinese people don't distinguish them when writing, even calligraphers. We care about "fast" and "beautiful". The standard glyphs among mainland, Taiwan/Hong Kong, Japan and Korea, are usually ...


5

Install input method tools such as Google Pinyin Windows only type u start to input then type follow to input radicals 丨 shu 竖 一 heng 横 丿 pie 撇 礻 shi 示 衤 yi 衣 But I think most easy way is Ctrl+C,Ctrl+V There is a list of radicals. Find it and copy it.


4

Use your own IME: 1) 2) Make sure that your IME is: 3) Choose "Phoetic" and directly input what you want.


3

As you are using the "Pinyin - Traditional" input method, maybe what you can see will only be the traditional character "嗎". To convert it into simplified Chinese, try this tool by pasting it into the blank and click the second button. By the way, sometimes we also use "麼" (or "么" in simplified form) at the end of a question. And the corresponding Pinyin ...


3

Many people in Hong Kong use Quick aka 速成 or Simplified Cangjie. There is a wiki link for this input method:Simplified Cangjie There is a build-in Quick IME in Windows and Mac. Most of the Quick users use it. Quick users type Chinese using Quick on smartphone too, as the build-in IME of smartphone that selling in Hong Kong usually support Quick. However, ...


3

I try to answer for the mainland China part. And I only mention Pinyin IME here because that's what I and the majority use. Windows: IMHO, the best Pinyin IME on Windows is Sogou Pinyin regarding match rate. As you might already know, Pinyin are not 1-to-1. Sogou Pinyin has the highest match rate of all IMEs I've used. I recommend you to try it if you're ...


2

Here's one way to do it which I figured out starting from some tips thanks to user2619 in the comments: Right click on the keyboard/IME icon in the system tray. Select "Settings" from the popup menu. The "Text Services and Input Languages" dialog will appear. Use the "General" tab. Under "Installed services" click on "Add...". Find the section "Chinese ...


2

I think you should use a fuzzy system instead of a strict one. The difference between 點(dot) and 捺(slash) is not always obvious even to native user. For example, in lower right corner of the character 木, the stroke is a slash, but when we writing the character 林, the slash become a dot in the left 木. Why? because there is no room to put a full slash there. ...


1

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/canton-guang-dong-pin-yin/id385519764?mt=8 or use stroke keyboard. Or ask Siri. The Cantonese version of Siri can understand Cantonese. Edit: Apple does not have such a keyboard and as you would know iOS does not allow custom keyboards. Anything suggested is a workaround. ...


1

吗 is a simplified Chinese character. You can tell from the short horizontal line where traditional would have four dots or legs. 嗎 is the traditional Chinese character equivalent. So if you really need 吗 you should install Simplified instead of or as well as Traditional Chinese. Traditional is used in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macao, but most people in ...



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