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9

Chinese characters and phonetics You say: Unlike English, Chinese is not a spelling language, which means there is no hint from the characters for pronunciation!!! Luckily for us, that's not true! Actually, by some estimates, almost 90% of characters have a phonetic component to them. To understand what that actually means, you have to know how ...


6

Simply put, adjectives in Chinese can function as verbs. More specifically, they can form predicates without the use of a copula verb such as 是. For this reason, adjectives in Chinese are sometimes considered to be a class of verbs called "stative verbs". You can refer to the answers of this previous question for more details: Stative verbs in Chinese: ...


6

I found the same situation, living in China for quite some time, and unlike some other people who have answered, I understand exactly what you're asking. It was quite annoying to try to learn new words when the native speaker just tells you the meaning of 3 characters together and doesn't know or can't explain each character's meaning. I think the answer is ...


5

just can list some famous universities as below: 1. Adelphi University 亞狄非大學 2. American University 美國大學 3. Arizona State University 亞利桑那州立大學 4. Andrews University 安德魯斯大學 5. Boston University 波士頓大學 6. Biola University 比奧拉大學 7. Baylor University 貝勒大學 8. Ball State University 鮑爾州立大學 9. Duke University 杜克大學 10. Drexel University 德雷塞爾大學 11. DePaul University ...


4

I personally believe that every character has its function in the sentence, but not all characters have a "translatable" meaning. Many characters, when they are added to the sentence, don't change the literal meaning of the sentence, but may create an emphasis or introduce a certain emotion, and there is no English equivalent to this phenomenon. Maybe that's ...


4

I found listening to music really helped when learning - artists from Taiwan and the south tend to sing more clearly in my opinion. perhaps you could start there. Also, it is worth noting that in English we have around 8000 unique syllables, whereas in (mandarin) Chinese there are only around 400 (multiply this by 4 for the tones).


3

Don't connect Chinese sounds to English sounds (or any other language, for that matter). It will only hinder your pronunciation. For example: A lot of learners want to connect 'xi' with the English 'she' - but first the Chinese 'x' is represented by the IPA letter ɕ where as the English 'sh' is represented by IPA ʃ - although it might be considered a ...


3

http://translate.google.com/#zh-CN/en/%E7%AD%9B%E9%80%89 It's a more sophisticated word than 过滤, which we usually use for filter. 过滤 mean filtering out unwanted substances, like filtering coffee. 筛选 is more for computer filtering.


2

maybe you want to check this: http://vancouverchinesegarden.com/calendar/iain-baxter/


2

Chinese is actually not hard to learn. People "think" it is hard because they only know 'European language system', they don't understand how those symbol works so they think it is hard to learn. Which Chinese are you trying to learn? Cantonese? Mandarin? Mandarin is use all over China and Cantonese is use in Hong Kong and South East China. Mandarin is ...


2

At a high level, the answer is yes, reading Chinese and an alphabetic writing system stimulates brain parts differently. For instance, in http://www.pitt.edu/~perfetti/PDF/Reading%20in%202%20writing%20systems.pdf, it says that Not only did results show more bilateral activation for Chinese in occipital and fusiform regions, they showed more activation ...


2

I'm so luck as a Chinese native speaker, that means I can skill that easily. even as a native speaker, I also can't write down to some Characters. in fact, We usually use a small part of these characters. more even, with PCs and Phones development, in the information period, I seldom have chance to write down these characters. so, don't worry, Just remember ...


2

I think memorizing foreign words are similar, for you to memorizing Chinese character and for me to memorizing English words, of course there some kind of rules, but rules won't be perfect, hard works are always needed.


2

Similar to learning prefix/suffix and transformation of words in Latin derived languages, it's quite important to break down a Chinese character (in Traditional Chinese, 繁體字) into different components. You will find most of the characters are constructed according to 六書 principles. Also Google for other resources on 六書. For example, in 葉(leaf) 碟(disk) ...


1

是 is a contact verb here. The grammar in example 我很好 is noun + adjective. just like subject + contact verb (ignored in Chinese) + predicative.


1

Generally speaking, “是” means “is”. In English you can use "be"+adjective to mean "A subject whose property/attribute is of sth": I'm well/better. But in Chinese, “是” is usually means "to define a subject to be sth":So when we say "some subject" “是” "sth", this means "Some subject equals sth". 我是学生:I'm a student (meaning I'm working as a student). So “是” ...


1

In my opinion, characters learning process is of the most importance in learning Mandarin Chinese. In my teaching experience, we've seen too many cases where there is a huge difference between the learning results of those who learn characters and those who skip this step just try to save time. The latter usually ended up spending more boring time memorizing ...


1

if you want to listen to separated 聲母(initial consonant) and 韻母(simple vowel), I would suggest this swf from here https://www.mdnkids.com/BoPoMo/BoPoMo.swf This material is made by 國語日報 from Taiwan. Just click those symbols (left 16 are vowels, right 21 are consonant) and you can listen to it. The tone of Taiwan Mandarin is a little bit different from that ...


1

You might come across the phrase 虛詞 which literally means "empty phrase" but refers to function words. I've heard people describe them as "meaningless" especially function words in classical texts but of course they have important grammatical functions. As for lexical terms, each character had a well defined meaning in Old Chinese but nowadays many of them ...


1

I'm not sure what your question is. As a native speaker, I think the words you refer to are function words (虚词), which have no direct meaning but has the function of organizing the sentence. The words have direct meaning are notional words (实词).


1

到 is OK. You could also use 至. 到 is more colloquial. In many cases they are interchangeable, for example: 从古到今/从古至今(from ancient times to the present), 直到此刻/直至此刻(up to now). But you could only say 自始至终(from the beginning to the end),从这到那(from here to there) because 自始至终 and 从这到那 are kinda like set phrases.


1

There's an animation named "喜洋洋和灰太狼" might give you a little help. It is usually for Chinese children at 3-4 years old when they start to learn the Chinese. I am a chinese native speaker, if you have any other problem,I'm glad to help.


1

成语接龙 is a game for fun, which is used for opening our mind. You don't need to make sure the first Chinese character of every 成语 should be same to last end character, only same pronunciation is enough. Try your best to figure out 成语 which help you improve your mind and memory.


1

There are times when a character is inserted for emphasis. At such times, it can be said that the character in question has no ADDITIONAL meaning. An example is given in the following: 太: Meaning in 灰太狼 太 is the character with "no meaning" even though it has a "standalone" meaning of "too.'


1

Actually it's true that every character have their own meaning. But many of foreigner can't understand every character without merge into sentence. So, probably they would just answer it NO MEANING. But as a person who are very linguistic, they can answer what it mean and completely answer what it's mean. For foreigner, even they know it can mean what, but ...



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