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A thread worth reviving. The word cigar came into English (and most other European languages) from Spanish. I don't really think it's possible to say which one Chinese got it from, based just on phonetics. Carol Benedict's book on tobacco in China, Golden-Silk Smoke, notes that "Filipino tobacco leaf and hand-rolled tobacco products began to flow to ...


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My 2 cents: Loanwords translation could simply depend on whether you are in PRC or in Taiwan. In Taiwan, phonetic translation seems a fashion. I'm not sure if it is another coincidence that Taiwanese culture is closer to Japanese culture. In old PRC, translation by meaning is easier to remember. Nowadays, with more people knowing or interested in English, ...


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I will try to put my two cents in, from a more psychological perspective. Chinese is largely a semantics-based writing system. Phonetically transcribed loan words are relatively easy to coin, but difficult to comprehend, unless the reader also understands the language from which the words come. When a new concept is introduced into the language, it's ...


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One reason is that Chinese is more diversified than Japanese in terms of topolects and dialects. 碧池, 沙发, 雷达 and so on may not be pronounced the intended way in other tongues than Mandarin, and so the terms become meaningless. Another reason would be linguistic pride. Iceland is another country that takes great care to form their own words rather than using ...


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At first, people don't fully understand the meaning of a concept, or the theory behind it. But they need a word to represent it. So that's why loanwords usually come out by pronunciation. Once people fully understand the meaning, they may come up with a version of their own expression. But whether that version can prevail depends on the social status of the ...


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互联网 and 因特网 may be different things - "internet" vs "Internet". Coming up with loanwords isn't a standardised practice; in the beginning you'll have separate groups coming up with different words, but over time the need to communicate will encourage people to start using the same one. Take LASER for example; since it was invented in the US, there were many ...


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There are three ways to translate a loanword: by its meaning, by its pronunciation or by both. Taking your example 互联网 vs 因特网, 互联网 is by its meaning (inter/inter-connected=互/互联, net=网); 因特网 is by both of its pronunciation and meaning (in=因, ter=特, net (by meaning)=网 My feeling is that when in the early stage of introduction of a loanword, it's more likely ...


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Zombie thread! In Wu dialect (in Zhejiang), this is pronounced as an almost exact transliteration of 'cigar' (like pinyin xiega, but with a short vowel on the first syllable). Several other transcriptions are also from Wu, coming through the Shanghai foreign port, such as jacket.


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古代汉语 is everything that is not 现代汉语. More precisely, we have 上古汉语 (Old Chinese: Oracle bones, Warring states, Qin; Classical Chinese: Spring and autumn, Han), 中古汉语 (Middle Chinese: Tang, Song) and 近代汉语 (mostly late Qing). 博士 was coined in the Warring states period, according to zdic.net. Disyllabic words have always existed, although the ideal used to be ...


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A hilarious passage. My edition says 漢巴德牛排 (no comma), if that's correct it's some kind of beefsteak; in the wine list there's a 巴德, could be related, beef steak with a wine based sauce? The article suggests port for 巴德, why not bordeaux? All guesses on my part. Some of the other dishes also look mangled: 澳洲翠鳥雞 the Australian kingfisher chicken surely ...


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We recommend that you use "你好" or “您好” instead of "嗨"


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Mostly wei can be used when you answer the phone , while it's too oralize to use over text. But someti mes you can see it like this: 他正在打电话:“喂?” 他不耐烦的说道:“喂,哪位?” I prefer it is better to use 你好 or 您好 as a alternative word. (Actually I use 您好 cause It's polite to when you talking or writing.) If you want to write a letter or email , adding a adj. word ...



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