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4

No. It became a variant way earlier than that. There may well have been a document to that effect in 1995, but it would not have been anything new. It is well established that 劵 and 券 were two different seal scripts characters, as @HenryHO points out. However, according to Qing Dynasty linguist Tuan Yu-tsai's annotated version of Shuo-wen Chieh-Tzu: ...


3

Many people in Hong Kong use Quick aka 速成 or Simplified Cangjie. There is a wiki link for this input method:Simplified Cangjie There is a build-in Quick IME in Windows and Mac. Most of the Quick users use it. Quick users type Chinese using Quick on smartphone too, as the build-in IME of smartphone that selling in Hong Kong usually support Quick. However, ...


3

I try to answer for the mainland China part. And I only mention Pinyin IME here because that's what I and the majority use. Windows: IMHO, the best Pinyin IME on Windows is Sogou Pinyin regarding match rate. As you might already know, Pinyin are not 1-to-1. Sogou Pinyin has the highest match rate of all IMEs I've used. I recommend you to try it if you're ...


2

Of course we have, you can see it on baidu.com. But because in China many provinces now have the right to have their own teaching syllabus, they may have different categorization of characters. But all the characters must come from the most common used 2500 characters. Then spread to the other characters.


2

I have finally managed to locate the document and the forum thread that lead me to it: http://www.china-language.gov.cn/wenziguifan/managed/003.htm User pts posted the best comments on the Skritter thread "刀/力 recognition" from November 2011: 1. 券 [quàn] means tickets or bonds. This one is easy. zdic.net defines 劵 [juàn] as 倦 (tired, exhausted). In ...



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