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2

in the past, it's 身分, which means the social position of an individual. http://dict.revised.moe.edu.tw/cgi-bin/cbdic/gsweb.cgi?o=dcbdic&searchid=Z00000131140 somehow, in modern times, it evolve to 身份. indeed, in taiwan, the identity card is "身分證", while in hong kong, it's "身份證". i would say that both "身分" & "身份" have their supporters. if you can ...


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i checked briefly, the earliest usage of "砲響" and "砲聲" was in the book 錢塘遺事, by 劉一清 of 元 dynasty. 卷九, on page 49, it recorded the event in 揚州, on 德祐丙子二月二十日, which was march 7th, in the year of 1276. clearly, joseph needham is a marvellous scholar :)


3

Brewitt-Taylor's English translation of San-guo yanyi calls it a "bomb." This was a kind of "signal bomb" 號砲 or 信砲. The earliest real historical record of these seems to have been the Yuan dyansty, as Song Yuanyao's comment notes. Joseph Needham's volume on "The Gunpowder Epic" has a brief mention of the use of these, for instance in the Mongol attack on ...


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It is very likely this was intended to have an adjectival meaning: "she is one dummy of a student." It is a VERY casual way of talking, much more likely to be sent as a text message or post than spoken, but I have seen LOTS of this kind of thing online. Think of it as a Chinese correlate to the pidgin English so many people use when they are posting ...


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的 is of, so 笨蛋 is refers to teacher


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I am native Chinese. I have to say that in practice such saying is very unlikely to be used. This is swearing at someone. For a Chinese language learner, it is not the path to go to dig into such things. Chinese language is not like western languages in that it is very simple in grammar. There is no time tense for verbs. There is no part of speech ...


4

If the sentence is 她是笨蛋学生 or 她是笨学生, it would mean She is a fool student, but since there is a 的 in between, 笨蛋 is a noun that refers to a person, and not an adjective anymore. So She is the student of a fool makes better sense.


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In addition to @Flaudre's answer below, which included this: 吃不了 unable to eat chi bu liao You can add another 了(this time 'le') to mean 'any more' (or a change of state, from being able to eat to not being able to eat): 我吃不了了 = I can't eat any more. I'm full up. I've had enough. wo chi bu liao le 了 is a great word!


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According to Wiktionary, 砲 can be defined as a catapult. It is acceptable to me that there have been catapults for a long time, probably dating back to the Zhou dynasty (warring states period) or even earlier {{citation needed}}. In Chinese chess, there is a piece called 砲 or 炮. There are too many confusing sources for the origin of Chinese chess, so I'm ...


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It's a quite interesting topic to discuss. I think 一 in 一聲砲響 is more like a correspondence to the 齊 in 一齊俱發 since a one big loud sound can indicate all catapults(or something else) at one time while several of them can not. So as the second example which has more of an emphasis of that sudden moment all hidden soldiers came out. With all description like ...


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"不能以" is a common term in 宋 dynasty, some examples from this time: 上清儲祥宮碑 by 蘇軾 . . . 臣嘗竊論之﹒黄帝老子之道﹒本也﹒方士之言﹒末也﹒修其本而末自應﹒故仁義不施﹒則韶濩之樂﹒不能以降天神﹒忠信不立﹒則射鄉之禮﹒不能以致刑措 the grammar of 不能以 in here is: if 仁義不施, then 不能 (cannot) 降天神 以 (by) 韶濩之樂 if 忠信不立, then 不能 (cannot) 致刑措 以 (by) 射鄉之禮 不能 modify the verb "降" & "致" 答李端叔書一首 by 蘇軾 . . . 尋常不通書問﹒怠慢之罪猶可闊畧﹒及足下斬然在疚﹒...


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First, I'm very surprised that a foreigner is even reading the classical article 前赤壁賦. For your question, I think the answer is related to omission, a common grammatical phenomenon in classical Chinese. Here, 以 doesn't mean "to stop". When it means to stop, 以 is just an alias of 已 (another common phenomenon, called 通假, where characters with similar ...


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"以" here has the same meaning as "已", which means "stop" in this context. Hence "不能" is modifying "以".


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施 - Like passers-by to beggars, have means of "succor" 给 - neutral,just give.(daily use) 予 - just give, often combine with 给~,~以(often used in official) 赏 - In the past was superior leadership to her/his subordinate, at present it often used in joke that he/she is your superior, you must take orders from him/her.



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