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8

The dog refers to the son. The term 犬子 originally meant "puppy": 【漢·列仙傳·邗子】邗子者,自言蜀人也,好放犬子。時有犬走入山穴,邗子隨入。 So calling one's son 犬子, would have been in essence referring to a child as "my little pup". That was not originally a self-deprecation. Instead, it was a childhood nickname for a famous poet, Ssu-ma Hsiang-ju: ...


7

也 is classified into 虚词(lit. imaginary word) in classical Chinese. 虚词, unlike its counterpart of 实词(lit. real word), doesn't have a meaning, but it's indispensable to some grammatical functions. It can: express the mood Complete a sentence structure. Work as an interjection or preposition. work as a filler to make a sentence satisfy the requirement on the ...


5

It basically just means no. 非 is no, 也 is just a modal.


5

On the most basic level they both mean "to tell", but they are not exactly the same - there is some nuanced differences. 吩咐 is closer to English "to instruct". It is often used to describe a superior, or elder, telling their juniors to do something. Thus, it carries the connotation of a verbal command, almost ordering someone to do something. But it is ...


4

也 in "非也" does not mean "also". It is a modal showing certainty.


4

The proper translation is geologic hazards. It is used to refer to any disaster that result from either human land use or natural geological processes. Consequently, it is quite a large and, yes, unspecific, group of disasters. In China, generally speaking it refers to one of the following: Rockfalls Mudslides Landslides Ground subsidences Sinkholes Earth ...


4

非也sounds like This is not so or in some context it meansNot at all in classical chinese. It is an elegant way of saying not.


4

Chinese Dream is mostly a political slogan of Chinese President Xi Jinping. It's the Communist Party's official vision for China since the 18th National Congress. 大家都在讨论中国梦,我以为,实现中华民族伟大复兴,就是中华民族近代以来最伟大的梦想 Everybody is discussing the Chinese Dream. I believe that accomplishing the great revival of the Chinese race, is the greatest dream of the ...


3

Yes,好棋 means "a good move"; either in chess-style games or, by analogy, anything related to a contest of strategy (e.g. 普京毁了一步好棋, "Putin screwed up a (previous) good move".) The phrase in question, 中国好棋, is a bit different. That originated from this poster, where it is the title of a poem: 对弈小神童,尚在长成中。游戏无规矩,打闹是常情。但凡说故事,必须中国赢。落子成定局,欢呼轻高音。中国我爱你,年少正青春。 ...


3

It's the same as songs in English - repetition is for rhythm. 你是我的小呀小苹果儿 You're my little - little apple Something like that.


3

I think the dog refers to son. Chinese parents called their sons "dog" mostly because they hope their kids can easily grow up as puppys. Depreciatory is also an important reason.


3

Is this XXX? 非也! It's YYY! = Is this XXX? NO! It's YYY!


3

Just like other answers, I'd say it basically means "no" in Chinese, but just let you know this word is not popular nowadays. It is a word that used in ancient Chinese. Now it's just 不 for "no".


2

"认识" means "acquaintance." That is to know someone by having met them. "知道" refers to "knowledge." That is, someone you may "know" someone by reputation, but have never met.


2

吩咐 just like the command. 嘱咐 just like the parents told something to son or ... kindly


2

I agree with @Semaphore, 嘱咐is more polite and more serious. If he says,"Could you...", he is doing 嘱咐. If he says,"Do as I command!" he is doing 吩咐. Examples above are just make it more black and white. By the way I'm chinese and my English grammar isn't very good. I hope it helps.


2

See this: 我是一只小小小小鸟,想要飞呀飞 却飞也飞不高。 The purpose of the additional words is to match the rhythm. They don't make sense usually. But in some condition, the are to emphasize the feeling. http://youtu.be/FdjR-AMz50c


2

"凭什么” is something similar to "who do you think you are to say i can't do it?" or "you're not qualified to judge me"


2

I think both "減" and "咸" exists in the ancient times, but for certain reasons scholars like to use "咸" in place of "減". 損也,從水,咸聲 == It has the same meaning as '損', water as glyph component, and the same pronunciation as '咸'. In 管子·宙合, which was written before the early Han Dynasty, it says "左操五音,右執五味,懷繩與准鉤,多備規軸,減 溜大成,是唯時德之節。 .... 減,盡也。溜,發也。 ...."


2

There have an old tale in China, saying that having a beast called "Nian" (年獸), and it will only attack people in spring. But it afraid all the things in red. That's why Chinese use many things in red in the lunar new year (also in spring). And it become a common color represent "lucky" in Chinese culture. More information about Nian can be found: ...


2

the dog is meant to describe the son. 犬子 means a boy like a dog. We think dog is not a powerful animal as opposed to tiger or lion. You can get the feeling in this phrase "虎父无犬子", meaning a father like a tiger can't have a son like a dog, which is usually used to compliment other person's son and their father. On the other hand, calling your own son 犬子 ...


2

just like this in English: You are my liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiittle apple. repeat for emphasize.


2

谦虚的说法,介绍自己的孩子通常用 犬子. 《史记·司马相如列传》:“少时好读书,学击剑,故其亲名之曰犬子。”


1

小苹果 has a lively rhythm. The additional 小 avoids prolonging other words.


1

中国前进 中国: China 前进: move/march forward Possible usage: to cheer up the team of athlete representing China in an international sport competition 中国好棋 中国: China 好棋: "good chess" Possible usage: usually used in games of chess for expressing one's feeling that certain move is a "good move" 棋, 球 球: ball 棋: chess 好球 Possible usage The quality of the ...


1

Since new swearing tag appears thick and fast... 他妈的is already sounds traditional... It could come out of a gentleman's mouth,like the essay wrote by the great writer and thinker Lu Xun: Those who live in China will often have occasion to hear the swear: tamade (他妈的) and others like it. I think the geographical distribution of this phrase is probably as ...


1

It is very common seeing shortened and generalized terms in PRC. 地震、泥石流、地面塌陷、火山爆发 ... --(generalize)--> 地质灾害 --(shorten)--> 地灾 Making things unspecified is some kind of trend, even in daily context. For example, people write "建議" instead of 提醒/主張/敦促/呼籲/規勸/勸告/忠告/勸諭/勸阻/警告/告誡/.... and "選擇" instead of 惟有/不如/只好/寧願/寧可/情願/甘願/決意/被迫/故意/.... The more unspecified ...


1

It's very offensive and strange to talk to strangers or in a formal situation. It also depends on users' level of social class I think. I never use it to describe something good or when I miss somebody. Speaking of that, I never use f..k in English to talk to my friends either. I guess it depends on the people's personality. I could imagine the gangsters ...


1

萌is more than cute or lovely,it performs a way to express the feelings about something is too adorable that you can't resist. It is like the one you described makes green shoots grow out of your heart. It is extended by Japanese phrase 萌え。 萌's common usage in chinese phrase: 萌芽,"grow up" 萌生,"grow out"


1

The word 萌 méng, defined as "sprout; bud; germinate" has the connotations of a "baby" plant. Another term for "cute" (at least in American English) is "baby-faced." To liken someone to a 萌 is to refer to him as a "baby" (face), and therefore cute.



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