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Intonation works, but particles and certain rhetorical phrases can also reveal mood: 哎,那部电影岂能没有意思呢。 果然 is often used sarcastically, to indicate an unexpected outcome: 在淘宝上订购了一条USB电缆,果然收到了指甲油为礼物。 Often the context is self-evident, just like in other languages: 对啦,真真想吃下那四天前做的谄媚的面条。


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Can intonation take part in Chinese as well? Yes of course. From my opinion, the sentences above could be translated word by word while still preserve their meaning. Or if you are writing it instead of actually saying it, you can add a few word to better illustrate the sarcastic sense. 这电影真好看。(stress 真) or 我在淘宝买了条USB线,结果赠品是指甲油。卖家真有脑。(here 有脑 ...


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The explanations above are very reasonable, however, when getting to the meaning of 我艹你 it does not have the same meaning as "I f*** you." would have if you told anyone in English. It is more like "I am gonna f*** you up." Or a really strong form of 我讨厌你 (= I hate you. / You are so annoying.)


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I agree with the translation of @jooshee. However, “业” doesn't directly mean "business" as in the way the western world uses it. It only gains this meaning, when combined in ways like the ones in the question. Classically, “业” means "to work" (verb) or "work" (noun) as becomes obvious form this 成语 : “安居乐业” , which can be translated to "to live in peace and ...


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企业: enterprise/corporation; business(only the organization, not the activity it engages in) 产业: industry; business(the activity but not the company/organization). eg. 软件产业=software industry/business, 房地产(业)=real estate (business) 商业: commerce/commercial eg. 商业(的)银行=commercial bank, 商业(的)软件=commercial software


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It really should depend on the context. Note that "Where am I?" has similar ambiguity in English. For instance, if I'm at a shop and speaking to someone on the phone who wants to know where I am, and I ask the shopkeeper 这是哪里?, it's expected for the name of the shop (or its location) to be given. This might also hold if I am on the street. Comparatively, ...


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产业 chan3 ye4 = industry 企业 qi3 ye4 = enterprise 商业 shang1 ye4 = business Notice each of the words contain "业". That one character means business. All three of the words mean business but different types of businesses based on size. Kind of like bread, then branching off into wheat bread, white bread.


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@wuerling's answer is right. There is another reason. Consider similar situations in English: shit --> shoot --> shucks --> sugar, hell --> heck, god --> gosh. Minced oath substitutes or euphemistic expressions formed by misspelling, mispronouncing, or replacing a part of a profane, blasphemous, or taboo term reduce the original term's ...


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Word to word ,it means local head. Like ali said 'A local with much influence' is a right way to understand it. But I never see someone using this phrase and it sounds weird to me. Maybe it only exist in some dialect. I am a Chinese and i suggest you don't use it in the future or it will be improper.



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