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1

I'm a native mandarine speaker and I never though 来 was such a complex word before you raised the question. But if you really what a explanation compatible with a dictionary, I guess you can understand 来 as its basic meaning "come". However, the thing about dictionary explanation is that it means "come", but it doesn't necessarily be translated as "come". ...


0

This problem seem to stem from attempting to map a Chinese character directly to a single English word. Don't do that. Like many other characters, 来 carries multiple meanings, and not all of those meanings have a direct English equivalent. The differences between dictionary meanings and a particular translation don't need to be "reconciled". Instead, ...


0

I think "你哪兒來的這麼多書?" is a common (well, to native Chinese speakers) pattern to rephrase the question "你這麼多書, 哪兒來的?" In Cantonese, we also have similar pattern such as "你邊處嚟咁多錢?" 邊處 = where; "處" is pronounced as "syu3" instead of "cyu3"; http://humanum.arts.cuhk.edu.hk/Lexis/lexi-can/search.php?q=%B3B 嚟 = come; "嚟" is a common replacement character of "來" ...


2

辰 means time. 寸 is a unit of length. These are what these means today; and the original meaning are exactly what you've quoted(寸 means thumb to be exact). And the etymology of 辱 actually makes sense. You wouldn't think of it as 牵强 if you take consideration that "to humiliate" doesn't always mean "to insult", it could also mean to "humble" (oneself), even in ...


4

Han Dynasty linguist Hsu Shen's explanation in Shuo-wen Chieh-Tzu: 【清·陳昌治刻本·說文解字】辱:恥也。从寸在辰下。失耕時,於封畺上戮之也。辰者,農之時也。故房星為辰,田候也。 【清·段玉裁·說文解字注】恥也。心部曰。恥,辱也。此之謂轉注。儀禮注曰。以白造緇曰辱。从寸在辰下。會意。寸者,法度也。而蜀切。三部。失耕時。故从辰。於封畺上戮之也。故从寸。辰者,農之時也。故房星爲辰。說从辰之意。 According to him, 辰 refers to date/time, i.e. for farming; and 寸 refers to laws and the judicial system. This ...


2

Oh, it is Joe the big wheatman! Joking aside, Pang Mailang seems to be his real name, while Yuesehan is more like an artistic nickname, like "Joseph".


1

It doesn't mean anything. There is a rule for English-Chinese name translation. You can google it. Some names might vary from places like Taiwan, Hongkong, etc. e.g. Madonna is 麦当娜 in mainland, 玛丹娜 in Tawiwan and Hongkong.


2

In that case, it means GOOD MOVE. 好棋(hao3qi2). If you see something like 他好棋, it should be read as (hao4qi2), which means HE IS INTO CHESS.


1

Definitely the son. 虎父无犬子: Eagles do not breed doves. Opp: 上梁不正下梁歪: Fish begins to stink at the head. (上梁 refers to the father or leader)


2

谦虚的说法,介绍自己的孩子通常用 犬子. 《史记·司马相如列传》:“少时好读书,学击剑,故其亲名之曰犬子。”


0

Same as "twinkle twinkle little star..."


1

小苹果 has a lively rhythm. The additional 小 avoids prolonging other words.


2

just like this in English: You are my liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiittle apple. repeat for emphasize.


5

Yes,好棋 means "a good move"; either in chess-style games or, by analogy, anything related to a contest of strategy (e.g. 普京毁了一步好棋, "Putin screwed up a (previous) good move".) The phrase in question, 中国好棋, is a bit different. That originated from this poster, where it is the title of a poem: 对弈小神童,尚在长成中。游戏无规矩,打闹是常情。但凡说故事,必须中国赢。落子成定局,欢呼轻高音。中国我爱你,年少正青春。 ...


2

中国前进 中国: China 前进: move/march forward Possible usage: to cheer up the team of athlete representing China in an international sport competition 中国好棋 中国: China 好棋: "good chess" Possible usage: usually used in games of chess for expressing one's feeling that certain move is a "good move" 棋, 球 球: ball 棋: chess 好球 Possible usage The quality of the ...


3

See this: 我是一只小小小小鸟,想要飞呀飞 却飞也飞不高。 The purpose of the additional words is to match the rhythm. They don't make sense usually. But in some condition, the are to emphasize the feeling. http://youtu.be/FdjR-AMz50c


4

It's the same as songs in English - repetition is for rhythm. 你是我的小呀小苹果儿 You're my little - little apple Something like that.


0

以柔制刚 means something like: use softness to overcome hardness overcome hardness with softness, conquer the unyielding with the yielding (打一食品) means: guess a food —— might mean it's two letters, you said it's English right? The answer? Maybe the answer is MM like M&Ms? Edit: what's soft on the outside and hard on the inside?


3

"凭什么” is something similar to "who do you think you are to say i can't do it?" or "you're not qualified to judge me"


2

I think both "減" and "咸" exists in the ancient times, but for certain reasons scholars like to use "咸" in place of "減". 損也,從水,咸聲 == It has the same meaning as '損', water as glyph component, and the same pronunciation as '咸'. In 管子·宙合, which was written before the early Han Dynasty, it says "左操五音,右執五味,懷繩與准鉤,多備規軸,減 溜大成,是唯時德之節。 .... 減,盡也。溜,發也。 ...."


4

Chinese Dream is mostly a political slogan of Chinese President Xi Jinping. It's the Communist Party's official vision for China since the 18th National Congress. 大家都在讨论中国梦,我以为,实现中华民族伟大复兴,就是中华民族近代以来最伟大的梦想 Everybody is discussing the Chinese Dream. I believe that accomplishing the great revival of the Chinese race, is the greatest dream of the ...


1

Since new swearing tag appears thick and fast... 他妈的is already sounds traditional... It could come out of a gentleman's mouth,like the essay wrote by the great writer and thinker Lu Xun: Those who live in China will often have occasion to hear the swear: tamade (他妈的) and others like it. I think the geographical distribution of this phrase is probably as ...


1

It is very common seeing shortened and generalized terms in PRC. 地震、泥石流、地面塌陷、火山爆发 ... --(generalize)--> 地质灾害 --(shorten)--> 地灾 Making things unspecified is some kind of trend, even in daily context. For example, people write "建議" instead of 提醒/主張/敦促/呼籲/規勸/勸告/忠告/勸諭/勸阻/警告/告誡/.... and "選擇" instead of 惟有/不如/只好/寧願/寧可/情願/甘願/決意/被迫/故意/.... The more unspecified ...


4

The proper translation is geologic hazards. It is used to refer to any disaster that result from either human land use or natural geological processes. Consequently, it is quite a large and, yes, unspecific, group of disasters. In China, generally speaking it refers to one of the following: Rockfalls Mudslides Landslides Ground subsidences Sinkholes Earth ...


1

It's very offensive and strange to talk to strangers or in a formal situation. It also depends on users' level of social class I think. I never use it to describe something good or when I miss somebody. Speaking of that, I never use f..k in English to talk to my friends either. I guess it depends on the people's personality. I could imagine the gangsters ...


1

萌is more than cute or lovely,it performs a way to express the feelings about something is too adorable that you can't resist. It is like the one you described makes green shoots grow out of your heart. It is extended by Japanese phrase 萌え。 萌's common usage in chinese phrase: 萌芽,"grow up" 萌生,"grow out"


1

The word 萌 méng, defined as "sprout; bud; germinate" has the connotations of a "baby" plant. Another term for "cute" (at least in American English) is "baby-faced." To liken someone to a 萌 is to refer to him as a "baby" (face), and therefore cute.


0

Red represents fire. Fire (離卦) in I-Ching (易經) also represents Light, Warmth, Sun, Smart, Talent, Beauty, etc. Hence, Red is considered a good color (when used properly).


2

There have an old tale in China, saying that having a beast called "Nian" (年獸), and it will only attack people in spring. But it afraid all the things in red. That's why Chinese use many things in red in the lunar new year (also in spring). And it become a common color represent "lucky" in Chinese culture. More information about Nian can be found: ...


2

the dog is meant to describe the son. 犬子 means a boy like a dog. We think dog is not a powerful animal as opposed to tiger or lion. You can get the feeling in this phrase "虎父无犬子", meaning a father like a tiger can't have a son like a dog, which is usually used to compliment other person's son and their father. On the other hand, calling your own son 犬子 ...


8

The dog refers to the son. The term 犬子 originally meant "puppy": 【漢·列仙傳·邗子】邗子者,自言蜀人也,好放犬子。時有犬走入山穴,邗子隨入。 So calling one's son 犬子, would have been in essence referring to a child as "my little pup". That was not originally a self-deprecation. Instead, it was a childhood nickname for a famous poet, Ssu-ma Hsiang-ju: ...


1

Did some research, although not very authoritative it still seems quite convincing: 犬子的叫法到底是怎么来的 个人觉得应该只是谦称 毕竟中国人一直讲究谦虚,不可能见人就称自己儿子是虎子 大概人说虎父无犬子,所以才会有犬子一称来谦虚的说自己的孩子 网上只说明犬子其中一个意思是指司马相如的小名 并没有明确说犬子来自司马相如的小名 The basic idea being that the phrase came from: 虎父无犬子: lit. lions don't father dogs - or lion father =/= dog son - so in order ...


3

I think the dog refers to son. Chinese parents called their sons "dog" mostly because they hope their kids can easily grow up as puppys. Depreciatory is also an important reason.



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