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Unfortunatelly, a character with some meaning doesn't necessarily take that meaning's radical. For example: the word 母亲 (mother) doesn't have the 女 (woman) radical, even though it has a woman's idea. That's what's happening with the word 土丘. Even though it has a "mountain" meaning, it doesn't necessarily take the mountain radical (阝). The other way around ...


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I kinda like his name after you give the mixed messages to it. But I think he just a 逗逼。Just check his lyrics, it just sh--.He become pop because of funny, nothing with music.


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This is an interesting question. Before I say anything I should warn you that I am not a linguist and some of my terminology could be off. Just to share some of my insight as a native Chinese speaker and hopefully you will find it helpful. I think there's some information lost in translation. There're two related, similar but not interchangeable concepts ...


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Could you share the context where you encountered this character? I'm almost certain that this character is only used in geographic names nowadays, for example, 阜阳 or 阜成门. This is why you could not find it in modern translations of the words dam or mound, because even most Chinese people would not understand the meaning of this single character 阜.


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Yes you do, you just have to look further down the results of Google image search (and I wasn't expecting the top most images =.=). However, I don't think 阜 means dam, but it does mean mound, though in 99% cases it would be 土丘 or some other words because 阜 does not appear in conversational Chinese as far as I know. You get images related to ears because 阝 ...


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To make appear the semantic difference clearly: 他跑步跑得很快 : he runs.. very fast! Likely pointing out he is a very fast runner, an athletic sprinter. 他很快地跑步 : he is fast going by running. You are pointing out he is fast (running) after something, moving this fast is not expected, he may be late for something, etc. The meaning is structural and contextual. ...


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Actually, yes. there are some differences. for example , the differences between 他跑步跑得很快。 vs 他很快地跑步。 are exactly differences between "He runs fast!" vs "He is running fast". 他跑步跑得很快 emphasize quickly or fast while "他很快地跑步" emphasize the verb "run". So. if no context, when you say "他跑步跑得很快", you probably are describing the man's speed, and when you say ...


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In my opinion, the biggest difference between these words is the context. We only use 却 in writing but we will never say 却 in a conversation. Meanwhile, we use 不过 more often than not in speaking. I suppose 不过》可是》但是》却 sorts by the context. There is no difference of intensity between them.They are unlike "although" and "but" in English. I'm really not good ...


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Who told you there is an intensity difference there? 你觉得它们不一样,不过我不这么认为。 你觉得它们不一样,可是我不这么认为。 你觉得它们不一样,但是我不这么认为。 你觉得它们不一样,然而我不这么认为。 你觉得它们不一样,而我却不这么认为。 They sound absolutely the same to my ears. You use different words only because you want it to sound slightly more colorful. Update: I might be wrong. See discussions in the comments. Anyway it is easy ...


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The answer is taken from this (awesome) article: The 是 … 的 construction in Mandarin, credit goes to the author Hugh Grigg and eastasiastudent.net. This article is published under Creative Commons license CC BY-NC-SA 3.0. This copy here is kept for reference. There are more links around this subject at the bottom of the original article. The 是 … 的 ...


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"都 ... 了" is a common structure. That means "... have done" or "it's [time] now" and is always used when the speaker is not satisfied or just angry. (1) It has a implicit meaning of blame for what you are doing. Example: 天哪,都八点了你怎么还没去上课? -- Gosh! It's 8 o'clock but you haven't go to school yet? (2) But sometimes we also use it when the speaker ...


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In the context ,都 is not refer to "all"。 "都...了" represent the level has already too high。


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都。。。。。了 basically emphasize the current state. Like 「我都已經開始做飯了,你們怎麼吃零食?」 (I started cooking, how come you are still eating snack?). In this case, cooking is not completed, yet you can still use 都。。。。。了. In essence, it is same as 「我已經開始做飯,你們怎麼吃零食?」, without 都。。。。。了 (I started cooking how come you are still eating snack?) Bear in mind that Chinese normally ...


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都。。。了 indicates past/completion of an event with an emphasis on time, and sometimes it's equivalent of don't you see 都(下午2点)了,你还没吃午饭呐? You didn't have your lunch yet? Don't you see it's 2 PM already?


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It is used to make a(n angry) comment on how late something has happened. 你看,都什么时候了,你怎么现在才来? Look, how late it is, and you have only arrived now? or simply: 这都什么时候了! How late!



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