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7

张三 Is pretty much the Chinese equivalent of John Doe. There's the well known phrase 张三李四 which means: any Tom, Dick, or Harry (ABC) any man in street (Oxford) 张三 is the first part of the phrase and you could totally use it as a name. 李四 like-wise would also work; there are two other names: 王五 and 赵六 that are mentioned in this word: ...


6

Some says that "乔治" is very close to George in Shanghainese (上海話) since Shanghai was the big harbor allows international trades in 17th century. Lots of phrases are created/translated at that time. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_Pidgin_English


5

The title is 海棠珍禽 - Begonia and rare bird. It's one of the common themes for classical Chinese painting, which I believe is what this title is for. The first two characters are Malus spectabilis, however, when Chinese say 海棠 especially in art works, we actually mean 秋海棠 - Begonia grandis, which is an herb instead of a tree. The last two characters are ...


4

Probably it is because it was a leap year (闰年). 闰 and 润 have same pronounciation, which is similar to English word ruin (even the tone are the same) but shorter. 闰 means intercalation and 润 means moist, smooth literally and nurturing, nourishing/nourished prosperity and affluence figuratively. 润 is often a good word and commonly used in people and ...


4

There is a computer library ('Wudi gender guesser') to predict the gender of a Chinese name, based on statistics of the use of individual Kanji caracters in Male/Female given names. This approach accounts for both for the meaning and the sound. There is an online version here http://namesorts.com/2014/03/27/chinese-name-gender-guesser-api/


3

For translating foreign name based on pronunciation, there is a rule, which may be different for mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. You can find some celebrity with the same name, looking it in wikipedia and change it to Chinese version. It will be much difficult if you want to choose a Chinese name, not a translation. Choosing name is an art. It is a ...


3

Pronunciation ≠ Spelling! It's very important to distinguish spellings from pronunciations, so I'm using IPA throughout my answer. I don't know how you pronounce "wang" or "wong", but it's very likely that the closest pronunciation available in your dialect of English is neither of them. Chinese pronunciations I'm basing my IPA off of the Wikipedia help ...


3

The traditional way is to use 甲、乙、丙、丁... which are ten in total. You can also prefix it with 男/女 to indicate gender as 男甲 (man A), or titles like 学生甲 (student A), 路人甲 (passer-by A). To make it more like a name use 张三、李四、王五、赵六. Those are common one but it's not carved in stones. You can make up your own as well e.g. 王二. And the number often indicates the ...


2

No, it is not the only one. Unless you think John sounds similar to 约翰. Chinese translations for foreign names and words (such as names of other stuff) are weird if you compare them to each other. People from the cities, Guangzhou, Hong Kong (Speaking Cantonese), and Shanghai (Speaking Wu), which were first open to the world, created these translations ...


1

Wang is the form of 拼音 (Pinyin). Wong is the form of 粤语 (Cantonese, Used in Guangdong province and Hong Kong). But The Cantonese style is a little different from Pinyin style, because Hong Kong used to be owned by Britain. British guys want to learn Cantonese more easily so they create the style. Notice that "Cantonese" means "广东的/广东人/广东话 (粤语)". "Canton" ...


1

I think they are 迪恩. In Chinese they sounds like "Dean" in English? Is that a Chinese Name for someone?


1

Sadly there are no such rules since customs varies from parts of China to other parts. And in different times, there were different trends. So there are no strict rules to follow. There are just patterns which loosely apply but with many exceptions. For example, 红(red) is thought to be more common in female names when it is the last character of a name. ...


1

A proper term would be 情夫: 男女两人,一方或双方已有配偶,他们之间发生性爱的行为,男方是女方的情夫 小三 can also be applied to a male as it means the third party in an affair or 第三者. 二公 and 二爺 are informal terms opposite to 二奶. 小白脸 does not necessarily refers to a man who has committed adultery with a married woman. It can also mean the the guy is living off the woman or that the guy has ...



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