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The traditional way is to use 甲、乙、丙、丁... which are ten in total. You can also prefix it with 男/女 to indicate gender as 男甲 (man A), or titles like 学生甲 (student A), 路人甲 (passer-by A). To make it more like a name use 张三、李四、王五、赵六. Those are common one but it's not carved in stones. You can make up your own as well e.g. 王二. And the number often indicates the ...


5

张三 Is pretty much the Chinese equivalent of John Doe. There's the well known phrase 张三李四 which means: any Tom, Dick, or Harry (ABC) any man in street (Oxford) 张三 is the first part of the phrase and you could totally use it as a name. 李四 like-wise would also work; there are two other names: 王五 and 赵六 that are mentioned in this word: ...


4

Probably it is because it was a leap year (闰年). 闰 and 润 have same pronounciation, which is similar to English word ruin (even the tone are the same) but shorter. 闰 means intercalation and 润 means moist, smooth literally and nurturing, nourishing/nourished prosperity and affluence figuratively. 润 is often a good word and commonly used in people and ...


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Yeah, Reechen is right, more like 'ru in' said quickly. Ask a Chinese to say 'under' and they will often say 'wunder', because 'u' is 'wu' when followed by a consonant in Pinyin, which is Chinese sounds written with Roman letters. The combination of phonemes 'g wu n' often seems to produce a sound like 'g win' or 'gwu in' in some speakers. It is pretty ...



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