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The Story of 没 As other commenters have noted, looking for logic in language is almost always futile. No natural language is logical. But there is a historical logic to language development; even if the existence of a phrase is a historical accident, it's sometimes interesting to see when that "accident" took place, and why. Such is the case with 没. One ...


5

This particular example is completely idiomatic. 不错 is an adjective meaning 'not bad', the negation of 错 as verb 'to wrong; to mistake' is '没有错'. Generally 没有 is used in past tense or perfect tense to falsify a statement of fact; 不 is used in present or future tense to express (un)willingness. 没有: 你吃饭了么?Have you eaten? 我没有吃。I haven't. 不: ...


5

I have some examples: 我没开车 我没关灯 我没喝水 Also, you can say 我没关灯 by any chance is a shortening of 我没有关灯,but there is few people speak like that. In some chances it is better to add 有 after 没, but in the other chances isn't.


5

Firstly - you are correct, as are the others who have posted here. 没 is unusual in that it negates 有 and only 有,and for simplicity can itself serve as a contraction of 没有. As others have pointed out, 没/没有 also has the unique grammatical role of indicating an action "not yet done" (in conjunction with 还 and 过) or "never done". 你去过香港吗?= Have you been to ...


4

有 can be translated as have in English. So when you want to say "I don't have money" in Chinese, you would say 我没有钱. If you don't have the word have in your English sentence, you don't need to use 有 in it's Chinese translation. A couple of really common phrases that use the character 没: 没关系 = That's OK 没门 Literally means no door, but it actually means no ...


3

没(有) means not have 不 means not The confusion arises because 错 has multiple meanings: As a noun, it can mean an error. 没(有)错 means have no error. Or idiomatically, not wrong. As an adjective, it can mean bad. 不错 means not bad. This adjective is always used with 不 in front. (有) is usually omitted in conversation.


2

The reason the verb 有 (yǒu) takes 没 (méi) while other verbs take 不 (bù) is that 没 (méi) means, 'not have' and 有 (yǒu) means 'have'; thus they are tied linguistically (interestingly). BTW, 没 (méi) can never literally serve as a contraction for 没有 (méiyǒu) 'not have', because by itself, historically, 没 (méi) already meant, 'not have'. One shouldn't discount ...


2

Just a supplement. There is actually a word "不得",which is a formal way to say "should not","not to be allowed","to be prohibited". You may say "我不得工作",which means "I am prohibited to work","I should not work", however, this meaning sounds very weird. You should also take care of the pronunciations. When "得" means "to have to","must",the pinyin is dĕi,while ...


1

没有 has some sense of past tense, similar to "haven't" or "didn't" "我没有吸烟" translates similarly to "I did not smoke". "我没有吃饭" translates similarly to "I have not eaten yet". 不 is rather neutral, and has some sense of present tense "我不吸烟" translates to "I don't smoke", it is stating a habit or a preference "我不吃饭" translates similarly to ...


1

Put it in simple words: 不 means "not" while 别 means "don't do something", it is also good to compare them with another negation word:没有, which literally means lack of the action:having, so in other words it means don't have or doesn't have. Don't forget in Chinese we don't conjugate the verbs.


1

It's quite possible that you are asking a question that makes no sense in the context of the language itself. Asian languages tend to be less logically-oriented than Western languages, and more influenced by temporal events, like politics and history. Scholars, for example, are able to date documents by the conspicuous absence of certain characters - writing ...



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