Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

15

Rather than saying that 两 is used with nouns, I would say that 两 is used with measure words. If you use any type of measure word with the number 2, use 两. For convenience, I've identified 3 types of measure words: Standard measure words, e.g. 两个人、两本书、两棵树. Numbers that are larger than 100, e.g. 两百, 两千三百六十二. 百, 千, and 万 can be seen as a sort of measure word. ...


11

It's 50 000 or 50,000, the same as international standard. Reference: 出版物上数字用法的规定 (General rules for writing numerals in publications) 8 多位整数与小数: 8 Multidigit integers and decimals: 8.1 阿拉伯数字书写的多位整数和小数的分节 8.1 Segmentations for multidigit integers and decimals written in Arabic numerals 8.1.1 ...


9

The standard way of stating this would be: 十英镑五十便士. Of course, as you might have suspected, there are other informal/colloquial ways of saying it. Here are some that I personally would not find odd: 十镑五/十块五 十块五毛 (based on the fact the pound/penny uses the same decimalized system as renminbi) 十点五(英)镑 十磅半/十块半 If anyone has any other suggestions, don't ...


7

For reading numbers aloud, the wikipedia page has a section "Reading and transcribing numbers" that you might find useful. Since I think you know the basics and your problem seems to affect the reading of "zero", let me quote this passage: "Interior zeroes before the unit position (as in 1002) must be spelt explicitly. The reason for this is that trailing ...


7

二 (èr) is used (with nouns), if you are talking about their order, but if you are counting how many, 两 (liăng) is used (also with nouns). Stated concisely: 两 (liăng) is a cardinal number, as in, 两个 (liăng-ge) 'two of something.' 二 (èr) is an ordinal number, as in, 第二个 (dì èr-ge) 'the second thing.' Perhaps more common in speech are the cardinal numbers, ...


6

质数 and 素数 are perfect synonyms. As far as I am aware of, both are used across all Chinese speaking regions. I couldn't find a reliable source on the origins or why there are two dissimilar terminologies for the same concept, but in the textbooks published in mainland China since late 90's, 质数 is the word for it, while in non-textbooks and older textbooks ...


6

As others have mentioned, these are measure words (also known as classifiers*). To give a basis of comparison, in English measure words generally occur for uncountable nouns. For instance, because "bread" is uncountable, you cannot say "*three breads"; you must say "three loaves of bread" or "three slices of bread" ("loaves" and "slices" are the measure ...


6

My understanding is that it is originally a military usage. Since the pronunciation yī is easily mistaken for 七 qī in radio transmissions etc, yāo is substituted in the interest of aural clarity. This usage is not found in Taiwan (although I can't speak for the Taiwanese military). This question has been answered before.


6

Regarding arabic numerals: I think modern usage sees arabic numbers to be generally acceptable. However the context of the material, or even the region, may influence whether they're commonly used or not. For example, in metropolitan areas you might commonly see phone numbers or prices expressed in digits, whereas in more traditional material you probably ...


6

It'a punctuation, which does not exist in English, and I don't know its English name. In Chinese it's called 顿号 (dun4 hao4). It is usually used between listing of things (or verb, or adjectives ... I don't know the grammar term, who can help me please edit the post): 屋子里有桌子、椅子、凳子。 Usually in English, comma would be used. In your example, it is just used ...


5

In the mainland of China (I don't know how people in Taiwan use this character, sorry), people usually use "yao" when reading numerical serial numbers, digit by digit. One typical application is the phone number. In almost all other cases, only "yi" should be used. Why can it mean "one"? The character for "yao" is "幺". Which originally (in classic Chinese) ...


5

For ordinal numbers use 二 as in 第二个小孩 or 第二天 If you are counting out loud it is perfectly fine to count 一, 二, 三, 四,五 etc. However, if you include a MW it should be 一个, 两个, 三个 etc. There are also some other special 2 words in Chinese: 一对 yí duì - A pair 一对兔 一双 yì shuāng- A pair 一双鞋 貳 also pronounced èr is used to represent the number 2 on ...


4

Good question and a little complex to answer. Previous answers seem good, and I want to make a conclusion based on them. Basically, 两 and 二 mean two, but either of them are used in some other cases, where they are not interchangeable. When counting (with single character), only 二 is used. You would hear "一二三四,二二三四..." as a melody when some is doing ...


4

Must the numerals be monosyllables? In my opinion, you can use multi-sllable numbers, like: 十五六公里 (fifteen or sixteen kilometers) 百八十个 (one hundred or eighty) 三十七八岁 (thirty-seven or thirty-eight years old) Restrictions on the measure words? No, I have no idea. Can there be at most two numerals? Yes, I have never seen more than 2 numbers ...


4

This is not only in Cantonese. People in several south provinces say these words. And most Chinese are familiar with 廿 (niàn or pán) and 卅, even though they don't usually say it. 卅 (sà) means 30 卌 (xì) means 40 皕 (bì) means 200


3

halfelf's answer is correct, but I'll say a little more about how they're used in Cantonese, since the behaviour of these abbreviations is a little unusual there. 廿 jaa6 indeed abbreviates 二十 ji6 sap6. Similarly, 卅 abbreviates 三十 saam1 sap6. But 卅 is pronounced saa1aa6, an unusual tone contour. Abbreviations for numbers 40 and above are formed regularly: ...


2

This is not actually an answer, more a guess. It is possible that they simply used 百 in line with the Japanese, and used 佰 according to their own custom (Hong Kong), and forgot to harmonise the two. Nothing mysterious, just a case of less than careful editing. A lot of Chinese might not even notice that there is any inconsistency.


2

It's for security. Upper-case of Chinese numbers prevent the number on financial forms from being modified. o一二三四五六七八九十百千 vs 零壹貳參肆伍陸柒捌玖拾佰仟 For example, you can easily make 一 become 二 or 十, but you cant make 壹 become 貳. Independent meanings of each character: 1. 壹: Consistent 2. 貳: Another 3. 參: Join (參加) 4. 肆: Presumptuous (放肆) 5. 伍: Associate with ...


2

While we're on this topic, you should also get used to: 《》 are equivalent title marks 那部电影的名字是《红高粱》: The title of that movie is Hong Gao Liang (Red Sorghum). 『...』 are quotation marks. If you're reading verticle text, use this as quotation marks: ﹁ . . . ﹂


1

I'm going to make the assumption that this is an informal interaction and a vocal conversation First would be declaring the 10 pounds which can be 十镑 (Shí bàng) which would translate to £10 or 十块 (Shí kuài) which would translate to 10 units of the relevant currency in this case pounds. 块 is a colloquial word and in my experience more commonly used to ...


1

Chinese is not alone in this. Think about English. We say "one thousand", "one hundred", but we don't really say "one ten". And all numbers between 20 and 100 are represented as "(root for higher digit)-ty + (lower digit)", if you follow this rule, then 13 should be "onety three", but no, it is "thirteen". I guess the reason is that people tend to make the ...


1

Try to give a non-technical explanation here for immersion :D In short, 本 is there to make it more natural than just 五书 (though 五书 may be possible in some cases, but it's another topic). It's not a plural marker, so you can say 一本书 (one book). The choice of 本 itself depends on what kind of object you have: here the object 书 (book), so we can use 本, but not ...


1

see the wikipedia for the prime numbers in Chinese; in very first it says: 质数,又稱素数, so to translate this into English is: "质数",is equal to "素数", so in Chinese they are both point to the prime numbers i think. I am a Chinese now live in Shanghai, i am not quite into the math things, but what i read form wikipeida is telling me that they are euqal.


1

For classifiers there are actually a large range and, contrary to the answer above, there doesn't exist a catch-all classifier which can be used in all situations. The classifier 个 is the most common one and is used by new learners when they cannot remember which one to use, but it is important that the correct classifier is used in each case. What is ...


1

I think English usage can serve as a good reference here. In English, saying "7 or 8" sounds normal as a way of expressing an estimate, but saying "7 or 9" does not sound normal as a way of expressing an estimate (instead you would express it as a range of 7 to 9). Likewise, saying "7, 8, or 9" in English does not sound like an estimate but rather like a ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible