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16

Even for educated Chinese people who know English fairly well, they do not use the same method that native English speakers use (the one mentioned in your question). The common methods Chinese use include: 1 - Read a small sequence of letters from the alphabet that contains the letter in question. “Theodore怎么拼?” “T-H-...” “等一下,是T还是P” ...


8

The shapes of Isogloss maps are generally identical to those of dialect maps. So I think this could give you some clues. Below is a sample for isogloss maps(from http://www.yupoo.com/photos/9919/7485900/) More of them: Suggestion: For more information about isogloss maps, visit http://image.baidu.com/ and type in "同言线". Further reading: ...


8

It's not just Cantonese. In Taiwanese Minnan (which does also preserve the labial final -m, usually), the finals of 法、凡、品 have also become alveolar. Also, most Hakka varieties have made the final of 品 alveolar too. This phenomenon is examined in p.258 under "Long-distance C..C effects", in the chapter on "Consonant-vowel interaction in Cantonese" by Moira ...


4

BTW, I have Schuessler's book, and the transcription shown in parentheses after the character indicates the Middle Chinese rather than Old Chinese pronunciation, so ńźi refers to MC rather than OC pronunciation. Back to your question, it's important to note that initial ńź- is being used as a transcription rather than an indication of the actual ...


4

I've made a chart here for my own understanding of Standard Mandarin Chinese phonology a while ago: a ai au an aŋ e ə əi əu ən əŋ i ia iai iau ian iaŋ ie iə iəu iən iəŋ io iu iuan iuə iun iuəŋ aɻ o u ua ...


4

Biang is an interesting character, being absent in many dictionaries, and having an unverified origin. I don't think it being uncommon is reason enough to consider its pronunciation to be non-standard, however. There are quite a few characters that have very uncommon pronunciations, so much so that for the rare ones, most native speakers would also find ...


3

As you probably know, in China they use pinyin to describe the pronunciation. Dictionaries will normally always mention the pinyin for the characters. Here you can find the link between pinyin and IPA: http://www.sino-platonic.org/complete/spp052_chinese_ipa.pdf http://talkbank.org/pinyin/Trad_chart_IPA.php ...


2

The simple answer is yes, it is a phonologically possible syllable in Mandarin Chinese. Remember for every Chinese syllable, there is a initial + final + tone , in this case, b is the initial, iang is the final, and the tone is 2, So the three factors complete its qualification as a Mandarin Chinese syllable.


1

In China, there isn't an custom of spelling potentially ambiguous letters. But spell them correctly is a "Rigid Demand". The intelligent Chinese invent many method of dealing with it. Repeat Repeat is the most common way to tell confusion. In many occasion, one spell, the other retell and he tell again to check it. Use common word In my experience, letter ...


1

OP, you have stated that you want to "study how the pronunciation of words change in different contexts" by reading IPA transcriptions of Chinese speech. I think this might be difficult because: Besides some well known Chinese-specific phenomena (e.g., 3rd tone tone-sandhi) and some pretty much universal phenomena (e.g., nasal assimilation), the ...


1

I want to note that if you have a relatively new computer, you have Chinese pinyin in your Input Language. Perhaps you can play around with the typing? And Taiwanese use a different system to learn, called zhuyin, which looks like this: ㄅㄆㄇㄈㄉㄊㄋㄌㄍㄎㄏㄐㄑㄒㄓㄔㄕㄖㄗㄘㄙㄧㄨㄩ ㄚㄛㄜㄝㄞㄟㄠㄡㄢㄣㄤㄥㄦ Finally, you may easily be able to find Chinese speakers who would like to learn ...



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