Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

The meaning is: 我爱你.I love you. 爱(ài, love) sounds like the English "I"; 老虎(lǎohǔ, tiger) sounds like "love"; 油(yoú, oil) sounds like "you". It originally comes from the movie 狮王争霸. In the movie 十三姨 teaches 黄飞鸿 (played by 李连杰 (Jet Li)) how to say I love you. 黄飞鸿 pronounces it as 爱老虎油. Afterwards 黄飞鸿's father overhears it and asks what it means. 黄飞鸿 says it ...


11

I've only heard it used in describing sexual situations, and wiktionary.org describes its usage as follows: This idiom usually only refers to a man taking advantage of a woman in a sexual situation. A typical example would be some creepy guy pinching the flight attendant's backside as she walks past. There's also a good discussion at ...


11

Actually, "好包了" does not mean "I'm full". You may see "...打好包了..." in the Google hits. It refers to "have made something into a package. If your friend say "这顿饭我包了". That means your friend will get the bill, and you don't pay the bill. You will see "7天包退" on some goods's package, that means "7 days to cancel purchase for non-faulty goods". And ...


10

Stepping in for my Chinese to Australian translations: Also a couple of other phrases that are good to keep in your toolkit Thank you 谢谢 Xièxiè Is the most basic and common way of saying thank you Australian Translation: Cheers Thanks 谢谢你 Xièxiè nǐ This is a more sincere or formal way of saying thank you Australian Translation: Thank you Thanks Heaps ...


9

Victor Mair has an essay answering your question directly: Danger + opportunity ≠ crisis, how a misunderstanding about Chinese characters has led many astray.


9

The dog refers to the son. The term 犬子 originally meant "puppy": 【漢·列仙傳·邗子】邗子者,自言蜀人也,好放犬子。時有犬走入山穴,邗子隨入。 So calling one's son 犬子, would have been in essence referring to a child as "my little pup". That was not originally a self-deprecation. Instead, it was a childhood nickname for a famous poet, Ssu-ma Hsiang-ju: ...


6

Here are some more examples of this style of adjective: 好吃 = 不错吃 好玩 = 不错玩 好用 = 不错用 好喝 = 不错喝 These terms are extremely common in Taiwanese Mandarin, however their origins are unclear. I suspect it's due to a mix of Taiwanese terms and errors in translation. Let's take one example, the 不錯吃 phrase. At first glance it seems to be an ...


5

The general idea for this idiom is that there's no guarantee for (whatever matter you are referring to) to come to fruition yet, likely whatever it was hasn't even been started. No way. Another way of saying this in Chinese is "(事情)还没有眉目" The character 八 (eight) is written with 2 strokes, the first one is 撇 (to the left), and the second one is 捺 (to the ...


5

绝尘 ABC: move very fast KEY: 1 run as if flying 2 be above mundane thoughts A netizen on Baidu Zhidao defines 绝尘而去 as:脚不沾土,形容奔驰得飞快 Another explains it this way: 绝是消失不见 绝尘就是消失在扬起的尘土里 绝尘而去就是飞快的离去了,消失在马蹄扬起的尘烟里 I would translate 大风绝尘而去 as big winds (are going to/will) sweep through


5

It is not a slang. This is the way some Chinese learn to pronounce I (爱) love (老虎) you (油) because they can't speak English.


5

Yes there are. Such language in Chinese is referred to as 回回话 Huíhui huà. Thanks to user xiaohouzi79 for pointing out the book Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic By Dru C. Gladney, which is partly viewable on Google Books. This book contains a large appendix, A Select Glossary of Hui Chinese Islamic Terms on pages 393 to 421. Here ...


5

my preference: "很不起眼儿" can be translated into “unimpressive”,while "其貌不扬" into "unimpressive-looking". The reason is that "unimpressive" can refer to many aspects such as his appearance, his achievement, and etc. Compared with"很不起眼儿", ""其貌不扬"is more specific to the appearance, so "looking" is added to "unimpressive".


4

You can try the following sentences which demonstrate humility: 不好意思,我的中文水平尚浅,有待跟您多多学习。 Sorry, my Chinese language skill is still shallow, there is still a lot to learn from you. 我的中文只不过马马虎虎而已,请您多多包涵。 My Chinese is just so-so only, please bear with me. 我的中文说得不好,请别见怪。 I am not good at speaking Mandarin, hope you don't mind. If someone is praising your ...


4

It all depends on the formality of the letter or email, the age of person being addressed, his/her relationship to you and how familiar you are with the said person. This is not something that you can define or quantify - you just have to get a feel for it. Anyway, for letters, the standard valediction goes something like this: 此致 敬礼! Note the double ...


4

"给我" is usually interpreted as a command or an order to do something for the speaker. "站住" means to halt or to stand still. "给我站住" is not an idiom, but a command to stop a person from walking away. In this case, Google Translate got it wrong. "给我站住" is usually spoken when someone has done something bad and you want that person to stop walking away from the ...


4

This happens when the food can be cooked with (little or much) or without spicy. People ask how should the food cook for you, 我爱辣 (a weird expression) answers this question indirectly -- I like spicy so please put a lot of it in the food. The direct answers could be: 不要 (bùyào) / 不要辣 (bùyào là) / 不放辣椒 (bù fàng làjiāo) "cook without spicy" 微辣 (wēi là) / 少放点 ...


4

There is no meaning for "酷比". I guess it could be just a transliteration of "cube", you see these two words are pronounced similarly. While "酷" has the meaning of cool, "酷比" stands for cube, "魔方" means Rubik's Cube, all these words put together make an easy-to-remember and catchy brand name. Brand names don't always have a meaning, they just need to be cool ...


4

There is no expression "好包了". Actually, "好饱了" is also a strange spelling, since we usually use "我吃饱了" to express "I am full".


4

ABC: inconspicuous; not striking; unremarkable A Chinese-English Dictionary: DIALECT not attract attention; not be noticeable; not be attractive 这座厂房并不起眼, 但产品却是第一流的。 Zhè zuò chǎngfáng bìng bù qǐyǎn, dàn chǎnpǐn què shì dì-yī liú de. The factory building doesn't attract much attention, but the products are first-class. 别看这人不起眼儿, 人家可是一肚子学问。 Bié kàn zhè ...


4

No particular reasons. It is considered as an art for ancient chinese, though the "art" in ancient China has not the same meaning of the modern "art", or even the occidental "art".


4

To rate something, I would say: (要)在十分內打個分數,(我會給六分) On a scale of 1 to 10, (I would give it a 6.) 在十分內 = Under a score of 10, 要 is just optional. Other ways of saying are: 若要评分,我会给...(To give a score, I would give...) 如果要我给分数,我会给...(If I have to rate it, I would give...) It is not frequent in Chinese to say something like this, comparing to English. ...


3

I think the dog refers to son. Chinese parents called their sons "dog" mostly because they hope their kids can easily grow up as puppys. Depreciatory is also an important reason.


3

I'm not sure we have a saying for "old wives tales". For the ones that works we call them 偏方 (Folk prescription), others are considered as 流言, 谣言 (rumor), 伪科学 (pseudoscience). One of such saying is that you cannot wash your hair during menstrual period. Another is that you cannot eat certain food (e.g., orange and seafood) together, otherwise they'll become ...


3

Essentially it's form of concession, either through a counterargument or the acquiesence of a mutually agreed upon opinion. There are different ways to express concession in Chinese. Here are some possible translations that I can think of based on your examples. This is far from exhaustive and some of them might be preferred over others depending on the ...


3

謹上 or 敬上 is fairly common. Your own name precede this closing term, contrary to English.


3

It is a euphemistic way to say so, as it would seem more polite. We would use subjunctive mood/subjonctif to translate this expression, as "Could I have..." or "Puis-je avoir...". Note that this is always in the form of a question, so please do not forget to add "...吗?" in the end.


3

When I first saw the question title, I thought you were looking for a way to express the statement 'I love spicy food', which is what 我爱辣 sounds like. Although grammatical, 我爱辣 doesn't sound very natural, probably because the pronunciation of 辣 is close to the tone particle 啦. A more natural expression is 我爱吃辣, in which 吃 (eat) nails la4 into the context of ...


3

I agree with you that the English classification you are using is not accurate because the strong negative inference is lost. 不起眼 represents the outer idea: but just taking 起眼 shows the highly negative implication of the main term: Therefore as you've noted, the English term is much softer than Chinese term used in this case. Regarding your side ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible