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13

The meaning is: 我爱你.I love you. 爱(ài, love) sounds like the English "I"; 老虎(lǎohǔ, tiger) sounds like "love"; 油(yoú, oil) sounds like "you". It originally comes from the movie 狮王争霸. In the movie 十三姨 teaches 黄飞鸿 (played by 李连杰 (Jet Li)) how to say I love you. 黄飞鸿 pronounces it as 爱老虎油. Afterwards 黄飞鸿's father overhears it and asks what it means. 黄飞鸿 says it ...


10

I've only heard it used in describing sexual situations, and wiktionary.org describes its usage as follows: This idiom usually only refers to a man taking advantage of a woman in a sexual situation. A typical example would be some creepy guy pinching the flight attendant's backside as she walks past. There's also a good discussion at ...


10

Actually, "好包了" does not mean "I'm full". You may see "...打好包了..." in the Google hits. It refers to "have made something into a package. If your friend say "这顿饭我包了". That means your friend will get the bill, and you don't pay the bill. You will see "7天包退" on some goods's package, that means "7 days to cancel purchase for non-faulty goods". And ...


8

Stepping in for my Chinese to Australian translations: Also a couple of other phrases that are good to keep in your toolkit Thank you 谢谢 Xièxiè Is the most basic and common way of saying thank you Australian Translation: Cheers Thanks 谢谢你 Xièxiè nǐ This is a more sincere or formal way of saying thank you Australian Translation: Thank you Thanks Heaps ...


6

Here are some more examples of this style of adjective: 好吃 = 不错吃 好玩 = 不错玩 好用 = 不错用 好喝 = 不错喝 These terms are extremely common in Taiwanese Mandarin, however their origins are unclear. I suspect it's due to a mix of Taiwanese terms and errors in translation. Let's take one example, the 不錯吃 phrase. At first glance it seems to be an ...


5

Yes there are. Such language in Chinese is referred to as 回回话 Huíhui huà. Thanks to user xiaohouzi79 for pointing out the book Muslim Chinese: Ethnic Nationalism in the People's Republic By Dru C. Gladney, which is partly viewable on Google Books. This book contains a large appendix, A Select Glossary of Hui Chinese Islamic Terms on pages 393 to 421. Here ...


4

There is no meaning for "酷比". I guess it could be just a transliteration of "cube", you see these two words are pronounced similarly. While "酷" has the meaning of cool, "酷比" stands for cube, "魔方" means Rubik's Cube, all these words put together make an easy-to-remember and catchy brand name. Brand names don't always have a meaning, they just need to be cool ...


4

This happens when the food can be cooked with (little or much) or without spicy. People ask how should the food cook for you, 我爱辣 (a weird expression) answers this question indirectly -- I like spicy so please put a lot of it in the food. The direct answers could be: 不要 (bùyào) / 不要辣 (bùyào là) / 不放辣椒 (bù fàng làjiāo) "cook without spicy" 微辣 (wēi là) / 少放点 ...


4

You can try the following sentences which demonstrate humility: 不好意思,我的中文水平尚浅,有待跟您多多学习。 Sorry, my Chinese language skill is still shallow, there is still a lot to learn from you. 我的中文只不过马马虎虎而已,请您多多包涵。 My Chinese is just so-so only, please bear with me. 我的中文说得不好,请别见怪。 I am not good at speaking Mandarin, hope you don't mind. If someone is praising your ...


4

It all depends on the formality of the letter or email, the age of person being addressed, his/her relationship to you and how familiar you are with the said person. This is not something that you can define or quantify - you just have to get a feel for it. Anyway, for letters, the standard valediction goes something like this: 此致 敬礼! Note the double ...


4

"给我" is usually interpreted as a command or an order to do something for the speaker. "站住" means to halt or to stand still. "给我站住" is not an idiom, but a command to stop a person from walking away. In this case, Google Translate got it wrong. "给我站住" is usually spoken when someone has done something bad and you want that person to stop walking away from the ...


3

Essentially it's form of concession, either through a counterargument or the acquiesence of a mutually agreed upon opinion. There are different ways to express concession in Chinese. Here are some possible translations that I can think of based on your examples. This is far from exhaustive and some of them might be preferred over others depending on the ...


3

I can only give some possible translations based on your explanation of "For all I know": For all I know, he might have gone abroad. 他说不准出国了呢。 For all I know, she doesn't even work there anymore. 她没准已经不在哪工作了呢。 For all I know, the test hasn't even been written yet. 测试题说不准还没出呢。 We would use "说不准" "没准" and things like that to ...


3

When I first saw the question title, I thought you were looking for a way to express the statement 'I love spicy food', which is what 我爱辣 sounds like. Although grammatical, 我爱辣 doesn't sound very natural, probably because the pronunciation of 辣 is close to the tone particle 啦. A more natural expression is 我爱吃辣, in which 吃 (eat) nails la4 into the context of ...


2

"可以来" is only used only you want to be very polite and or in a formal occasion. And the sentence start with "可以来" must be finish with "吗?", otherwise the whole clause will not make any sense. For example: "可以来 one burger 吗?" or "我可以来 one burger 吗?" Literally, it is translated in English as "May I ( ask you to ) bring ( me ) a burger?" "我可以" equals "May ...


2

I've never heard "危险机会", and I don't think it is valid in Chinese. "危机" does not carry the meaning of "opportunity". However, there are always opportunities in a crisis situation. Sometimes the ability of a person can be only shown in crisis situations. So a crisis is sometimes considered as an opportunity to appeal one's ability in achieve some task. And ...


2

This is more of an expansion on NSX's comment from above, but hopefully it gives you something extra to learn. 我爱吃辣的 "I love to eat spicy food" 我喜欢吃辣的 "I like eating spicy food" if you don't want to emphasize the 'love' part, you just want to state matter of factly that you like eating spicy food You might get asked by new acquaintances 你可以吃辣的吗? or ...


2

I don't think 酷比 has any virtual meaning. But one can argue it means cool guy. 比 is a homophone of 逼, which is a homophone of 屄, which means female genital. It can be used to refer people. For example, 傻逼 means ass-hole. Similarly, 酷逼 means cool guy. Generally, 酷比 is just a name without any virtual meaning.


1

I'll draw some comparisons with Japanese. 不好意思 is similar to Sumimasen (すみません), which means excuse me/sorry, depending on context. It's a more lighter version of 对不起. 对不起 is more similar to Gomenasai, which is very deep, like if you did something wrong that you really regret and wish you can undo the mistake. Examples: 不好意思, 我们的面了卖完了。(Sorry, but our ...


1

I may be wrong, but I always equated 对不住 with 辜负. As some of the above posters have said, 对不起 is a little bit formal, and, at least in my experience, not used too often. 不好意思 is what you generally hear. When I was living in mainland China, it seemed rare to hear 对不起, especially among friends. My Chinese friends often thought it was strange when I would say ...


1

Google Translate translates "酷比" as "cool", The reason why Google translated like this is that "cool" means "酷" (it may have many meanings according to different kinds of contexts, may be 爽 or 帅). Strictly speaking, we Chinese usually don't use "酷比" but "酷毙"。"毙" here doesn't mean "make someone die by shooting" but is a complement to descript the depth ...


1

Hong Kongers use 多謝 (do ze) and 唔該 (ng goi). Both mean thank you. But they have slightly different connotations / usage. For 多謝, it usually means thank you for something which others gave you such as present or cash. For 唔該, it usually means thank you for some service that others offer to you (For example, someone helped you open a door, you can say 唔該). ...


1

From then I learned two ways of responding to "谢谢" (xièxiè) I don't think so: "谢谢你" (Thank you) is really a response to those who have helped you. However, to give a respectful response to them, you would say "不用谢" or 不客气. So "不客气" is a very polite reply to "Thank you", but you cannot equate "谢谢" with "不客气"。 A very typical scenario is: A: Please help ...


1

I can't find a Chinese song named '今天你要嫁给我好吗'. Is it "今天你要嫁給我" by 陶喆 ? Considered about the sentence "今天你要嫁给我好吗", I think "今天你要嫁给我吗" or "今天嫁给我好吗" are better. "你願意嫁給我嗎?"is smooth and clear too. However, adding "今天" is more pressing. In fact, in the song '今天你要嫁給我', it used '今天嫁給我好嗎' as a question.


1

In Short Variant One 柴米油盐 Pinyin : chai2 mi3 you2 yan2 Variant Two 鍋碗瓢盆 Pinyin : guo1 wan3 piao3 pen2 Literally : wok, bowl, ladle and tub Detailed In my area, sometimes we just say it that way. As a Chinese, I don't quite feel like to go that deep into the source behind, nor did I really care about there're some three other ...


1

Figuring things out There is a very similar metaphor in English, but usage is much more restricted: When I told John the money was gone, I could see the wheels turning (in his head). Very often the use is: A person learns some new or surprising information. This information causes the person to think, and they slowly start figuring out the ...


1

吃豆腐 refers to sexual harassment or men being frivolous with women. Apparently it refers to a Tofu-shop a long time ago where the husbands rubs the tofu at night and the wife sells it during the day. To sell more tofu the wife flirts with her customers and the customers even grope her. The jealous wives of these "customers" will afterwards complain to their ...



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